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February 17th, 2015

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia last September. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Australian photographer Daniel Berehulak of Getty Images has won Photographer of the Year honors in the Reportage Division of the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, which is currently underway at the University of Missouri in Columbia. Paul Hansen of Sweden and Daniel Rodrigues of Portugal were the first and second runners up, respectively.

Berehulak’s winning portfolio emphasized his coverage of the Ebola crisis in West Africa. It also included stories about national elections in India, the economic downturn in Brazil, and single images from stories in Somalia, Afghanistan, and Kenya.

In other POYi Reportage Division categories, Lisa Krantz (USA) won the Community Awareness Award for her project titled “A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity.”  Finalists for the award included Mario Tama (USA), Toni Greaves (USA), April Saul (USA) and Kuang Huimin (China). (Krantz also won second place for her obesity project in the Issue Reporting Picture Story category of the POYi competition’s Newspaper Division.)

The World Understanding Award went to Jan Grarup (Denmark) for “Somalia in Transition,” and judges awarded Special Recognition to Ryan Spencer Reed (USA) for his project titled “Despite Similarities to Reality.” Finalists for the World Understanding Award were Edu Ponces (Spain), Paula Bronstein (USA), and Renée C. Byer (USA).

David Chancellor (UK) won the Environmental Vision Award for his project “With Butterflies and Warriors.” Michael Robinson Chavez (USA) was awarded special recognition for “The Driest Season: California’s Dust Bowl.”

Other POYi Reportage Division categories and winners included:

News Picture Story: John Moore (1); Carolyn Cole (2); Arash Khamooshi (3)
Feature Picture Story: Hajdú D. András (1); Tomás Munita (2); Corrina Kern (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story: Brent Stirton (1); Alex Masi (2); Daniel Berehulak (3)
Science & Natural History Picture Story: Javier Arcenillas (1); unidentified* (2); Stuart Palley (3)
Science & Natural History: unidentified* (1); unidentified* (2); unidentified* (3)
Best Photography Book Award: TBA The Long Shadow of Chernobyl by Gerd Ludwig

Judging for the POYi competition began February 2 with News Division Entries. Winners in that division, selected last week, included Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Sports Photographer of the Year Cameron Spencer of Getty Images.

Judging for the Reportage Division took place from February 11 to February 14. The competition concludes this week with judging of the Visual Editing Division entries.

*Contest organizers have posted all the winning entries, but have not officially identified winners. Please help us name them.

Related stories:

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize

February 12th, 2015

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year Prize

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

Danish photographer Mads Nissen of the daily newspaper Politiken has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2014 prize for an image showing a gay couple during an intimate moment in St. Petersburg, Russia. The image, which was part of the news coverage last year about rising discrimination and hate crimes attacks against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Russia, also won first prize in the Contemporary Issues category of the World Press Photo competition. The winners of the contest were announced February 12 in Amsterdam.

Read the full story at


February 10th, 2015

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

©Cameron Spencer

©Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Photographer Cameron Spencer of Getty Images has been named Sports Photographer of the Year at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers announced today. His portfolio included a variety of dramatic sports action and feature images from a wide array of sporting events, including the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Runners up for the award were second place winner Al Bello of Getty Images and third place winner Patrick Smith.

In other sports categories, first prize for a Sports Action photo went to Al Bello of Getty Images for his dramatic shot of New York Giants receiver making a one-handed touchdown catch.

The winners of other sports categories are:

Sports Feature: Robert Sabo/Getty (1); Cameron Spencer/Getty (2); Ricky Carioti
Recreational Sports: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Sol Neelman (2); Austin Anthony/AP (3)
Sports Action: Al Bello/Getty (1); Alex Livesey/Getty (2); Joel Marklund
Winter Olympics: Lucas Jackson/Reuters (1); Joel Marklund (2); Ezra Shaw/Getty
Sports Picture Story: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Cristina Aldehuela (2); Yasuyoshi Chiba (3)

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Sports photo categories fall under the competition’s News Division. Judging of Reportage Division entries begins tomorrow.

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

February 10th, 2015

Funding Your Long-Term Photo Project—Upcoming Award and Fellowship Deadlines

Two awards and a pair of reporting fellowships are currently seeking applications.

The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is seeking applications for reporting fellowships on the topics of health/development and religion.

IRP says that the fellowship awards will include “roundtrip air tickets to and from [fellows’] homes and destinations, but all other travel must be arranged and paid by the fellow. IRP will offer a stipend based, in part, upon the budgets that all applicants must submit.”

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until the deadline on Monday, March 16. Applicants can be freelance or staffers. For more information visit the program website.

The 5,000 Euro (approx. $5656) Alfred Fried Photography Award is seeking photographs that answer the question, “What does peace look like?” All photojournalists may enter the Austria-based award competition free of charge. The entry deadline is May 17, 2015. Visit the Fried Award website for more information.

Last but not least, the New Orleans Photo Alliance is currently accepting applications for its annual Michael P. Smith Fund For Documentary Photography award of $5,000. The award is open to photographers based on the Gulf Coast of the United States—Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Emma Raynes, Director of Programs at the Magnum Foundation, is the judge for this year’s award. Applications require a fee of $25, and are due March 30, 2015. For more info visit the NOPA website.

February 6th, 2015

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

From "Last One Standing," a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

From “Last One Standing,” a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tennessee has won Newspaper Photographer of the Year honors at the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International competition. Vest’s portfolio stood out for its journalistic and esthetic quality, POYi organizers said in a statement released on Friday evening.

Runners-up for the award were Michael Robinson Chavez of the Los Angeles Times, who won second place; and Lisa Krantz of the San Antonio Express-News, who took third place.

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Judging for the News Division categories ends later today.

Winners of other News Division categories so far include Bulent Kilic, who won first place in the Spot News category for his dramatic photograph of an air strike against ISIS militants near the Turkish border; and Alexey Furman, first place winner in the Portrait category for his photograph of a woman who survived the shelling of her home in eastern Ukraine.

Philip Montgomery won first place in the Feature category for an image from the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, while Evgeniy Maloletka won top hones in the General News category for a graphic image from the scene of the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine last summer.

Organizers will officially announce the names of all winners after the judging is complete on February 20.

Winners PDN was able to identify of categories judged so far in the News Division include:

Feature: Philip Montgomery (1); Toni Greaves (2); Kevin Frayer (3)
General News: Evgeniy Maloletka (1); Andreas Bardell (2); unidentified* (3)
World Health: Pete Muller (1); unidentified* (2); John Moore (3)
Portrait: Alexey Furman (1); Philip Montgomery (2); Asa Sjöström (3)
Portrait Series: Victoria Will (1); Marcus Trappaud Bjørn (2); Pieter ten Hoopen (3)
Spot News: Bulent Kilic (1); Moises Saman (2); Anastasia Vlasova (3)
Human Conflict: William Daniels (1); Bulent Kilic (2); Andrey Stenin (3)
News Picture Story–Newspaper: unidentified* (1); Marcus Yam (2); Marcus Yam (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Lisa Krantz (2); unidentified (3)
Feature Picture Story–Newspaper: Stiller Ákos (1); Spencer Heaps (2); Mads Nissen (3)
Photographer of the Year–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Michael Robinson Chavez (2); Lisa Krantz (3)

Judging for sports category entries began over the weekend, and ends today (Monday). Reportage Division entries will be judged later this week, while Editing Division entries will be judged during the week of February 16.

*Readers: Please help us identify these winners.

February 3rd, 2015

Grant Deadlines: Magnum/Inge Morath, Manuel Rivera-Ortiz and Pulitzer Center

Deadlines are coming up for grants supporting women photographers, and photographers working on social issues.

The 2015 Inge Morath Award 

© Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Inge Morath. © Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Magnum and the Inge Morath Foundation have announced deadlines for the 14th annual Inge Morath Award: submissions must be received by April 30th, 2015.

The two foundations award $5,000 to a female photographer under the age of 30, in support of the completion of a long-term documentary project. One winner and up to two finalists are selected by a jury composed of Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.

Morath was an Austrian-born photographer who was associated with Magnum Photos for nearly 50 years. The Inge Morath Foundation was established after her death in 2002, and her colleagues at Magnum created an award in her honor.

Shannon Jensen won the last award, in 2014, for “A Long Walk.” For more information, visit All submissions must be made online at

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film 2015

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film has opened a call for submissions for its global grant; both professional and emerging photographers of all nationalities are encouraged to submit documentary photography projects on topics of human suffering and unrest, forgotten communities, exploited lands and people, on communities ravaged by war, poverty, famine, disease, and the exploitation of global resources.

The foundation awards one $5,000 grant to one documentary project based mostly on submitted proposal and a 15-image portfolio. Photographers must show a commitment to the field of reportage and documentary photography.

Submissions are judged in three rounds by a panel of professionals representing the documentary photography industry. The first round assesses entries based on submission worthiness; A pre-selection jury will selects the “Top-24” and consequently the “Top-12” portfolios during round two. The “Top 12″ shortlisted portfolios will be featured and displayed during Les Rencontres d’Arles in Arles, France.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2015. The selected project must be completed the calendar year following receipt of the grant. For more details, rules and submission guidelines, visit

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting’s $150,000 Nuclear Threat Initiative Grant

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is expanding its coverage of nuclear security issues, thanks to a new grant from the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI). The Pulitzer Center plans to produce a series of stories on under-covered nuclear issues for its “Going Nuclear” gateway

The 18-month grant is worth $150,000, earmarked for nuclear security projects like “Plutonium Mountain,” a report by David Hoffman of The Washington Post and Eben Harrell of Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, which the Pulitzer Center previously funded.

The NTI is a non-partisan, nonprofit organization that has supported independent news coverage on weapons of mass destruction since its founding in 2001.

For information on Pulitzer Center reporting grants, see

January 28th, 2015

PDN Video Pick: Acclaimed Beijing Portrait Project, Expanded with Video

With support from two clients and a creative approach to funding, photographer Sim Chi Yin has just released this video showing an old project from a new, more immersive angle. The video profiles Zhang Xi, a college graduate turned street peddler who is part of Beijing’s “Rat Tribe,” so named because they live in sub-standard apartments in the basements and former bomb shelters of the city.

Sim’s portraits of “Rat Tribe” basement dwellers, which she began making in 2010, have been widely published–and widely acclaimed. She previously produced a multimedia slideshow of the portraits. But this video expands on her earlier work by exploring how one subject ended up living in a Beijing basement, the tension it has caused with his parents, and what day-to-day life is like for him.

The video, published January 24 by Creative Time Reports (CTR) and Al Jazeera America, is also a case study in multi-source production funding. Sim says it was first “leanly funded” by CTR, a media website that commissioned the video last fall for a European conference on migration issues. For additional funding, Sim applied to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. Around the same time, Al Jazeera America asked Sim for new portraits of Beijing basement dwellers, and an updated multimedia piece. So she put CTR and Al Jazeera in touch with each other, and “they decided to work together and timed their publications to appear on the same day.”

Sim hired producer Yin Jiawei, a recent college graduate, to work as a fixer and assist with the shooting.  The video was edited by Jian Yi, a freelance Chinese filmmaker.

Picture Story: Beijing’s Basement Dwellers
PDN’s 30 2013: Sim Chi Yin

January 14th, 2015

PDN Video: Jay Maisel on How to Be a Better Street Photographer

Jay Maisel on How to Be a Better Photographer from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

Based on the lessons he’s taught to photography students over the past five years at PhotoPlus Expo and elsewhere, legendary photographer Jay Maisel recently published Light, Gesture & Color (New Riders Press). He describes the book as one “for people that are tired of bullshit books that tell them exactly what to do, and so they get rote results.” In this video, Maisel shares advice from his book on how to take better photographs, including tips on how to be a more successful street photographer. In a separate PDN video, Maisel explains what he means by the term “gesture,” why it is an important element of good photographs, and how to recognize and use it to your advantage.

Jay Maisel on the Importance of “Gesture” in Photography

January 9th, 2015

National Geographic’s Photo Engineering at Work

Striving for new and unusual ways to photograph subjects from land, sea, and air, National Geographic photographers often turn for technical assistance to NG photo engineers Kenji Yamaguchi and David Mathews. The two men, who are the subjects of an article in January PDN and now on PDN online, devise ingenious tools for making pictures that would otherwise be too dangerous or difficult for photographers to make. ““These guys are the unsung heroes of the Geographic,” says long-time contributor George Steinmetz.

Yamaguchi and Mathews worked behind the scenes on Nick Nichols’s Serengeti lions project, Steve Winter’s snow leopards project, and various projects by underwater photographer David Doubilet, to name just a few examples. Here are some videos that show their technical ingenuity in action:


Nick Nichols and his assistant, Nathan Williamson, at work on the Serengeti lions project with a robotic camera tank and a camera drone.


Steve Winter explains how he used camera traps to photograph a mountain lion at night under the Hollywood sign.


The Photo Engineering department faces possible budget cuts, but National Geographic recently profiled of Kenji Yamaguchi, with this video showing him at work in the publisher’s Photo Engineering lab.


Addition videos on National Geographic’s web site:

Steve Winter describes his 2008 snow leopard project in northern India. Scenes of Winter setting up remote cameras and strobes on snow leopard trails start at 2:47.

An encounter, narrated by Steve Winter, between a tiger and a robotic camera vehicle developed by NG Photo Engineering.

Scenes from the sinking of a ship for the creation of an artificial reef, featuring David Doubilet’s remote camera images from the ship’s deck as engineers set explosive charges, then detonated them. Remote camera images begin at 1:21.

Related Article:
The Technical Ingenuity of National Geographic’s Photo Engineering Department

December 23rd, 2014

Amazon Sells iPhone Accessories Infringing Copyrighted News Images of War, Death

Amazon page offering a smartphone case decorated with Daniel Berehulak's image from Liberia.

Amazon page offering a smartphone case decorated with Daniel Berehulak’s image from Liberia.

Dealers of cellphone and iPad cases emblazoned with copyrighted news images by Tomas Van Houtryve, Daniel Berehulak, Tyler Hicks and other photojournalists are using Amazon’s marketplace to sell their wares without permission from the photographers. All the images had been featured by TIME magazine on its “Picks of the Top 10 Photos of 2014.” In addition to the cases featuring news images—such as a photo of a child dying of Ebola and a child killed in an air attack on Gaza—the sellers listed on Amazon also sell cases featuring photos of nature, pets, cars, celebrity actors, major sports teams and other subjects.

A Tyler Hicks image from Gaza on a cellphone case sold by a vendor via Amazon.

A Tyler Hicks image from Gaza on a cellphone case sold by a vendor via Amazon.

One of the infringed photographers, Tomas Van Houtryve, had complained that Amazon removed some of the items infringing his photo, but not all. Van Houtryve tells PDN that after he discovered the unauthorized use of his black-and-white image on cases being sold through Amazon, he contacted the online retailer through the email it provides to report copyright infringement. An automated form asked for more information verifying that he holds the copyright to the image. He says, “I provided that along with a detailed list of links to all of the products infringing on my copyright. I also requested the contact information of the vendors/manufacturers providing the illegal cases,” he says. The following day, some of the products were removed, but many remained. He received another automated email from Amazon saying, “We trust this will bring the matter to a close.” He says, “As you can imagine, I’m not satisfied with this response.” On December 20, he took to Instagram and Facebook, posting images of the pages where the products decorated with his image were sold.

The Massimo Sestini image, cropped on a smartphone case.

The Massimo Sestini image, cropped on a smartphone case.

A search of Amazon for the names of other photographers featured on the TIME list turned up cellphone and iPad cases featuring Tyler Hicks’ image from Gaza of a boy carrying a dead child, Daniel Berehulak’s image of health workers in Liberia carrying a child suffering from Ebola (who later died), and part of Massimo Sestini’s photo of a crowded boat transporting migrants from Africa to Malta, and a tight crop on a portion of Whitney Curtis’s image of police pointing automatic weapons at a protester in Ferguson, Missouri.

Erik Fairleigh, PR spokesperson for Amazon, declined PDN’s request for comment, except to tell PDN “the item is no longer listed for sale,” referring to the product Van Houtryve had complained about. On December 23, however, products made with images by Berehulak, Hicks and Sestini remained on the site.

JP Pappis of Polaris Images, which represents Sestini, says that purusing the makers of the cases would be too costly, since they would be difficult to identify and locate and, if they are overseas, would be beyond the reach of U.S. federal courts. (All the cases “ship from China,” according to the delivery information listed on Amazon.) Sarah Lochting of Getty Images, which represents Daniel Berehulak said the agency is “pursuing the matter. We find it particularly egregious given the content of these images.”

The cases sell for between $12 and $15 through Amazon’s third-party vendor system, which allows any individual or company that fills out an online form to sell their products on Amazon. Amazon’s only requirement is that the seller pay a fee, agree to let Amazon take a cut of sales, and agree to the “Amazon Services Business Solutions Agreement,” which includes a clause indemnifying Amazon against “any claim, loss, damage, settlement, cost, expense or other liability” arising from “any actual or alleged infringement of any Intellectual Property Rights.”

Recognize this photo? Let us know.

Recognize this photo? Let us know.

The sellers offering the photo-emblazoned cases use many names, including David Ray Floyd, Sonja B Williams, DODO7899, Janice Lee Curry, NicoleWilliamHarris. 

Take a look. And if you see your photo on one of the cases being sold, let us know.

Recognize the photo? Let us know.

Recognize the photo? Let us know.