You are currently browsing the archives for the Photojournalism category.

April 15th, 2014

Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award Announced

The International Women’s Media Foundation has announced the creation of the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, honoring the Associated Press photojournalist who was slain April 4 while covering preparations for the recent elections in Afghanistan.

IWMF, based in Washington, DC, says the award will be given annually “to a woman photojournalist whose work follows in the footsteps of Anja Niedringhaus.”

Details of the award, including its monetary value and when the first award will be given, are undetermined. “We’re bouncing around a lot of ideas,” including the possibility of giving it to more than one photojournalist a year, says IWMF spokesperson Anna Schiller. “We’re still working on the details.”

The award is being established with a $1 million endowment gift from the Howard G. Buffet Foundation, according to IWMF. Several years ago, the foundation provided funding for Niedringhaus to attend Harvard University as a 2007 Nieman Fellow.

“I considered Anja a friend who represented the best of photojournalism. By creating this award, we ensure her spirit lives on,” Howard Buffet said in a statement released with the IWMF announcement.

Niedringhaus and AP correspondent Kathy Gannon were traveling with a convoy of election workers who were delivering ballots in the town of Khost, near the border with Pakistan when they were shot by an Afghan police commander on April 4. Niedringhaus died immediately. Gannon is recovering from her injuries.

Niedringhaus started her career in 1990 as a staff photographer for European Press Photo Agency. She joined the AP in 2002, covering assignments throughout the Middle East as well as Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to the AP.

Recognized for covering war and its effects on local populations, she won the IWMF Courage in Journalism Award in 2005.

At her funeral on April 12 in the central German town of Hoexter, AP Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll said of the slain photographer: “She found the quiet human moments that connected people in great strife to all the rest of us around the world.”

Related:
AP Photographer Anja Niedringhaus Killed in Afghanistan

April 14th, 2014

Tyler Hicks, Josh Haner Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

The New York Times has taken both Pulitzer Prizes for photography, prize administrators at Columbia University announced today.

See the full story at PDNOnline.com.

Related:
AP, Javier Manzano Win (2013) Pulitzer Prizes for Photography (subscription required)

April 4th, 2014

AP Photographer Anja Niedringhaus Killed in Afghanistan

Anja Niedringhaus in 2005. ©Associated Press/Peter Dejong

Anja Niedringhaus in 2005. ©Associated Press/Peter Dejong

Associated Press staff photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot and  killed while covering the run-up to elections in Afghanistan, the Associated Press announced this morning. Regional correspondent Kathy Gannon was injured in the same attack and is undergoing treatment at a hospital, the wire service said.

“[I]t appears they were targeted and attacked,” AP president and CEO Gary Pruitt said a statement.

AP says Niedringhaus and Gannon were shot by an Afghan police officer while traveling with a convoy of election workers who were delivering ballots in the town of Khost, near the border with Pakistan. The convoy was protected by Afghan soldiers and police, according to AP. Gannon and Niedringhaus were in their own car with a driver and another unidentified freelance journalist who witnessed the attack.

“As they were sitting in the car waiting for the convoy to move, a unit commander named Naqibullah walked up to the car, yelled ‘Allahu Akbar’ — God is Great — and opened fire on them in the back seat with his AK-47. He then surrendered to the other police and was arrested,” AP says in its report of the incident.

“Those of you who worked with Anja know what a life force she was: spirited, intrepid and fearless, with a raucous laugh that we will always remember,” Pruitt says in his statement about the attack.

Niedringhaus, who was 48, was based in Geneva. She joined AP in 2002, and had worked throughout the Middle East, as well as in Afghanistan and Pakistan. She was among the team of eleven AP photographers who shared 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for coverage of Iraq.

April 2nd, 2014

PDN Video: Lens Blog’s James Estrin’s Career Tips for Photojournalists

Jim Estrin: 6 Tips for Emerging Photojournalists from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

James Estrin, founder and co-editor of Lens, the popular New York Times photography blog, talks about how to launch a successful career as a photojournalist. His tips and insight cover how to choose meaningful projects, the importance of photojournalistic process, and practical advice about portfolios, mentors, and relationship-building with editors and peers.

Related:
PDN Video: Is Your Photo Project a Contender for Lens Blog?
PDN Video: How to Get the Most Out of a Portfolio Review
PDN’s 30 Photographers Provide Career Tips to Aspiring Photographers
PDN’s 30 2014: New and Emerging Photographers to Watch

April 2nd, 2014

Alexia Foundation, Open Society Calling for Submissions

The Alexia Foundation and the Open Society Foundations separately announced calls for submissions from photographers yesterday.

The Alexia Foundation issued a call for entries for its 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant, which will provide a $25,000 grant for the production of a project “on a significant issue involving and affecting women,” the foundation said in its announcement.

“Unlike the first Women’s Initiative grant, which specifically focused on abuse of women in the United States, this call for entries is intended to permit the photographer to propose a serious documentary photographic or multimedia project encompassing any issue involving women anywhere in the world,” the foundation says.

The deadline for grant applications is June 30, 2014. More details are available at the Alexia Foundation website.

Meanwhile, The Open Society Documentary Photography Project is calling for photo projects for an upcoming group exhibition on surveillance. The exhibition will include the work of five or six photographers, according to Open Society Foundations (OSF).

The deadline for applications is May 1, 2014.

“We are seeking photo-based projects that explore surveillance-related issues from a variety of perspectives. We encourage applicants to interpret the theme broadly,” OSF said in the announcement.

Called Moving Walls 22: Watching You, Watching Me: Photography in an Age of Surveillance, the exhibition is scheduled to run from October 29, 2014, to May 2015 at Open Society Foundations–New York. See the OSF website for complete application information.

March 31st, 2014

Spanish Journalists Freed After 194 Days in Captivity in Syria

Spanish photojournalist Ricardo Garcia-Vilanova and reporter Javier Espinosa were freed by their Syrian captors Saturday night, 194 days after they were kidnapped while attempting to cover the Syrian civil war for the Spanish daily El Mundo, according to reports by NPPA and other news outlets.

Espinosa is a staff reporter for the Spanish daily El Mundo. Garcia-Vilanova, a freelancer, was on assignment with Espinosa when they were abducted by an Al-Qaeda affiliates at a checkpoint, shortly after crossing into Syria from Turkey last September 16.

Both men were reportedly in good health when they were released to Turkish authorities, and have since been re-united with their families in Spain.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, Syria ranks as the world’s most dangerous place for journalists, who “are targeted, kidnapped by all sides in the conflict.”

Related:
Spanish Photographer and Reporter Abducted by Al-Qaeda Affiliate in Syria
Freelance Photographer Killed in Syria

March 26th, 2014

Tlumacki, Proctor Win Photojournalist of the Year Honors at BOP

John Tlumacki of The Boston Globe has won Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets) at the 2013 Best of Photojournalism competition, while Sean Proctor of Michigan’s Midland Daily News has won Photojournalist of the Year (Small Markets).

The National Press Photographers’ Association, which sponsors the competition, announced the complete results on March 24.

Tlumacki won largely on the strength of his coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings in April, 2013. He was at the scene when the bombs exploded. “While others ran away,” NPPA said, “Tlumacki ran toward the scene.”

He spent months documenting the recovery of victims he photographed at the scene.

Proctor, meanwhile, is relatively new to photojournalism, having graduated from Central Michigan University in 2011. He held internships before joining the Midland Daily News just over a year ago, according to NPPA.

In other categories, Patrick Smith won Sports Photojournalist of the Year for the second year in a row. Last month, Smith was named 2014 POYi Sports Photographer of the Year by the Pictures of the Year International Competition.

Jim Gehrz of the Minneapolis Star Tribune won the Cliff Edom “New America” Award for a story about the oil boom in North Dakota and its impact on traditional life there.

Rick Loomis of the Los Angeles Times won the Returning Veterans Coming Home award.

NPPA has posted a complete list of winners on its web site. (Scroll way down.)

Judges for BOP’s still photography competition were photojournalists Cheryl Diaz Meyer and Bill Luster; Kenneth Irby of The Poynter Institute, and NPPA president Mark Dolan. The judging took place at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication.

March 25th, 2014

Tomas van Houtryve Drone Essay Longest Ever Published by Harper’s

 

© Tomas van Houtryve/VII

© Tomas van Houtryve/VII. ”Baseball practice in Montgomery County, Maryland. According to records obtained from the FAA, which issued 1,428 domestic drone permits between 2007 and early 2013, the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the U.S. Navy have applied for drone authorization in Montgomery County.”

Tomas van Houtryve takes on the proliferation of drones as weapons and as tools of surveillance in the April issue of Harper’s Magazine, in a photo essay titled “Blue Sky Days.” At 16 pages, it’s the largest picture story ever published by Harper’s.

To create the work, Van Houtryve’s outfit a drone he purchased on Amazon.com for still photography and video, and then piloted it, in areas throughout the United States, over “the very sorts of gatherings that have become habitual targets for foreign air strikes,” the introductory text explains. These included weddings, funerals, and groups of people exercising or praying. The images also depict domestic borders, prisons and other areas where military or police have flown surveillance drones, or have applied for permits to do so.

“His idea was daring, elegant, and perfectly timed,” Harper’s art director Stacey D. Clarkson told PDN via email. “He explained that the technology for drones is way ahead of legislation concerning them, and though drones are part of our contemporary reality, the specific ways they are used (and can be used) are not in the public consciousness. The urgency of the work, the complexity of the ideas, needed space to be properly conveyed. And the images themselves needed to run large in order for the reader to see what Tomas’s drone could see—embroidery on top of a hat, spokes on a bicycle wheel, and home plate at a neighborhood baseball field.”

Captions for the photos make the connection between, for instance, a group of people exercising in a park, and the fact that a gathering of exercising men might, for the CIA, constitute evidence of a terrorist training camp. The effect is chilling. In an image of a wedding in central Philadelphia, a flower girl is the only member of a wedding party looking up at van Houtrve’s drone as he makes his image. A U.S. drone struck a wedding in Yemen in December 2013, killing 12 people, the caption tells us.

The essay’s title refers to the testimony a 13-year-old Pakistani boy named Zubair Rehman gave on Capitol Hill after his grandmother was killed by a drone strike while she was picking vegetables in her yard. The boy told lawmakers he no longer loves blue skies. “The drones do not fly when the skies are gray,” he said.

Van Houtryve will exhibit and speak about “Blue Sky Days” in New York on Friday, April 4, as part of “Surveillance.01-USA,” a symposium on surveillance-based visual arts projects. He will also appear with Clarkson at the University of Colorado, Boulder on April 7 as part of the university’s ATLAS speaker series.

Related: Client Meeting: Harper’s Magazine (accessible to PDN subscribers)
If We Spend $25K On A Photo Essay, Readers Should Pay to See It, Says Harper’s Publisher

March 24th, 2014

VII Photo Announces 5 New Photographers in its Mentor Program

© Poulomi Basu/VII Mentor Program

© Poulomi Basu/VII Mentor Program

VII Photo announced today that five emerging photographers have been selected to join the photo agency’s mentor program.

This year’s roster of photographers were chosen from 150 applicants. Over the next two years, VII photographers will mentor the five emerging photographers to foster their professional growth. The five are:

Poulomi Basu, based in New Delhi, who will be mentored by Stefano DeLuigi
Maika Elan, based in Hanoi, who will be mentored by John Stanmeyer
Ali Arkady, based in Khanaqin, Iraq, who will be mentored by Ed Kashi
Arthur Bondar, currently based in Moscow, who will be mentored by Donald Weber
Cristobal Olivares, based in Santiago, Chile, who will be mentored by Christopher Morris

These five replace the photographers who will soon complete their two years of mentoring in the program: Gazi Nafis Ahmed, Sim Chi Yin, Laura El-Tantawy, Jost Franko and Amanda Rivkin.

VII launched its mentor program in 2008. Past participants have included Benedicte Kurzen, Peter DiCampo, Erin Trieb, Agnes Dherbeys and Gulio Di Sturco. Anastasia Taylor-Lind, who entered the mentor program in 2009 and is now a full member of VII Photo, provided this fun quote for the VII press release: “When I joined the Mentor Program in 2009 I was working part-time as a chiropractor’s receptionist to fund my documentary projects. I knew how to make pictures then, but not how to be a photographer. My mentor, Ron Haviv, taught me how to find my photographic voice and by the time I left two years later I was a fully fledged full-time photojournalist.”

March 7th, 2014

Eddie Adams Workshop, Smith Grant, Other Grants Accepting Applications

Earlier this week The Eddie Adams Workshop began accepting applications for its tuition-free, four-day photojournalism workshop in upstate New York. The Eddie Adams Workshop brings together top photography professionals and 100 students each year, and its alumni include many of the top photojournalists working today. Applications for the 2014 Workshop will be accepted through May 31. Students are selected based on the merit of their portfolios.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund is accepting applications through May 31 for the 2014 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography, which carries an award of $30,000. In addition, the jury will also give out an additional $5,000 in fellowships. There is a $50 fee to apply.

The nonprofit arts advocacy organization Crusade for Art is accepting proposals for its first-ever Engagement Grant, a $10,000 award given to a photographer or group of photographers who submit “the most innovative plan for increasing their audience and collector base.” There is a $20 fee to apply.

The Photographic Museum of Humanity, a digital photography museum, is awarding a grant of $4,000 for photographers. Applications are due March 12, and judges include Alec Soth and Diana Markosian. There is no fee to apply.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Minnesota’s Artist Initiative Grants (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Jon Lowenstein’s Guggenheim Fellowship (PDN subscription required)