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July 10th, 2012

Portrait Photographer Ann Marsden Dies at 55

Portrait and fine-art photographer Ann Marsden died on Sunday, July 9, after a two-year battle with cervical cancer, reports Minnesota Public Radio. She was 55. Marsden was born and raised in St. Paul, and remained in the Twin Cities all her life, where she was a well-known member of the arts scene. Her clients included Fortune 500 companies, like Target and Best Buy, publications and various local theaters, where she made headshots of the actors as well as images of stage performances. Marsden also taught photography and exhibited her fine-art work in the area. According to an obituary in the StarTribune, she is survived by her partner, Ann Prim; her mother, Mary Marsden; her sister, Betsy McConnell; and her brothers, Brian and Craig Marsden.

 

May 7th, 2012

Music Photographer Jim McCrary Dies at 72

Jim McCrary, the former A&M Records staff photographer who shot the cover of Carole King’s Tapestry and other rock-and-roll albums, died on April 29, 2012, “of complications from a chronic nervous system disorder,” the Los Angeles Times reports. He was 72 years old.

McCrary was born and raised in Los Angeles. He was a self-taught photographer who eventually studied at Pasadena City College and Art Center College of Design. McCrary began his career as a staff photographer at various portrait studios and in the photography department of Rockwell International, a manufacturing company involved in the aircraft, space and consumer electronics industries, amongst others.

In 1967 he became the chief photographer for A&M Records and ended up photographing over 300 album covers during the seven years he worked there. Some of his most famous covers include Carole King’s Tapestry, the Carpenters’ Ticket to Ride and Joe Crocker’s Mad Dogs and Englishmen. He also shot related publicity and advertising work for Gram Parsons, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Cat Stevens, Peter Frampton, Herb Alpert and other musicians.

After leaving the label, he owned his own studio in Hollywood until 1990. He then co-founded Pix Inc., a professional camera store in Los Angeles.

McCrary is survived by his son, Jason McCrary, and his brothers Wylee Dale McCrary and Doug McCrary.

April 20th, 2012

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

© chrishondrosfund.org

Anniversaries like today are difficult, in part because they remind us how the people we mourn died, not how they lived.

To bring some good out of tragedy, the families and loved ones of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died a year ago today in Misrata, Libya, asked that gifts in their memories be made to charities and funds that continue the work to which they gave so much of their energy and time. These memorials have already resulted in scholarships and other good works that continue their legacies and remind us of the commitment that inspired their careers.

 

© timhetherington.org

After his death, the family of Tim Hetherington selected three charities that he supported:

Human Rights Watch, the independent organization dedicated to defending and protecting human rights; Hetherington was documenting the humanitarian crisis in Libya for Human Rights at the time of his death: hrw.org

Milton Margai School for the Blind in Sierra Leone,
a school where Hetherington photographed and worked with students (and set up a pen-pal exchange) who had been intentionally blinded by the Revolutionary United Force: www.miltonmargaischool.org

Committee to Protect Journalists,the non-profit organization which since 1981 has promoted press freedom around the world by protecting and defending journalists from fear of reprisal: cpj.org

In addition, Hetherington’s parents, Judith and Alistair Hetherington, are now setting up a non-profit foundation in the UK and US “to help students, artists and those in need here and in the developing world, so that his commitment to highlighting the truth and humanitarianism will continue.” Information is available on timhetherington.org.

Hondros’s fiancée, Christine Piaia, and his friends and colleagues at Getty Images set up The Chris Hondros Fund to support aspiring photographers and raise public awareness about the contributions of photojournalists: www.chrishondrosfund.org.

The first of the Chris Hondros scholarships was given last fall at the Eddie Adams Workshop (which Hondros had attended) to photographer Enrico Fabian. At the same ceremony,  the Tim Hetherington Memorial Award was given to photographer Dominic Bracco II.

The first Tim Hetherington Grant, administered by Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo, was awarded last year to Stephen Ferry to support his long-term documentary project on the effects of the guerilla war in Colombia.

In more recent news, the first session of the Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC), a free first-aid course for journalists covering conflict, began in New York City this week.  The program was started by Hetherington’s friend and frequent collaborator, writer Sebastian Junger. Supported with donations from ABC News, National Geographic, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast, Getty Images and the Chris Hondros Fund, RISC training programs will also be held in London and Beirut. (Information can be found at  risctraining.org/)

The goal of the program is to train more journalists so that, if needed, they could help colleagues injured in the field.

Helping journalists help journalists: That seems like a fitting tribute as we remember two colleagues who gave so much to their community. Of course, we’ll still be thinking of them, and all who mourn for them, long after this one-year milestone has passed.

Related Articles:
Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop

Hetherington, Hondros Loved Ones Choose Memorial Charities


Stephen Ferry Wins First Tim Hetherington Grant

Free Conflict-Training Course Now Accepting Applications

http://pdnpulse.pdnonline.com/2012/03/free-conflict-training-course-now-accepting-applications.html

Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington: A Reflection

March 6th, 2012

Obituary: Photographer Paula Lerner, Leader of Photo Advocacy Group

Photographer Paula Lerner, past vice president of the Editorial Photographers trade association and creator of an Emmy-winning multimedia piece, died today at her home in Belmont, Massachusetts, according to her family. The cause of death was breast cancer.

Raised in Hudson, Ohio, Lerner attended Harvard University and became a photojournalist in1985. Her clients included Time, Inc., People, and Harvard Business Review. In the Nineties, she became a leader of Editorial Photographers (EP), the volunteer organization supporting the rights of editorial photographers. She was a frequent lecturer on photographers’ rights and business practices.

“Paula dedicated a good portion of her life to help make life as a editorial photographer better for others,” notes Seth Resnick, past president of EP. “Paula always fought for what she believed in and always eloquently conveyed her position. At times she sacrificed  her own career to better the industry.”

Brian Smith, EP’s president notes that as the organization’s founding VP, “[Lerner] was directly involved in negotiating the Business Week and Forbes contracts that raised the bar for fair deals for editorial photographers. Paula remained committed to educating and inspiring others and it is extremely sad to lose her just as she was producing the finest work of her career.”

Her photography often focused on women’s issues. In 2003, she began volunteering her time to photograph the work of Business Council for Peace (Bpeace), a non-profit organization that helped women in conflict zones develop businesses. She eventually began recording sound and shooting video. From 2005 to 2006, she traveled to Afghanistan five times, on her own and with Bpeace, to document the lives of women in Kandahar.  She spearheaded the multimedia piece “Behind the Veil,” a six-part multimedia series published by the Globe and Mail newspaper. In 2010, it won an Emmy award for New Approaches to News and Documentary  Programming: Current News Coverage. “People in the West know very little about Afghan women…This feature tells some very important, untold stories that we need to hear in order to inform our policy decisions,” Lerner told PDN.

Lerner also co-authored the book Why We Walk: The Inspirational Journey Toward a Cure for Breast Cancer, published in 2005. While working on the photos for the book, she herself was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Lerner is survived by her husband, Thomas Dunlap, their two daughters, her brother and her parents and stepmother.

A memorial service will be held March 9th at 10 am at Beth El Temple Center, 2 Concord Avenue, Belmont, Massachusetts. Lerner requested that donations be made in her memory to Bpeace www.bpeace.org and to Metavivor, which supports research into metastic breast cancer and supports the families of patients with metastic breast cancer.

Related story
Globe and Mail, New York Times and Time Win Emmy Awards

January 30th, 2012

Photographer Andrew MacNaughtan Dies, Age 47

Toronto-based photographer Andrew MacNaughtan died on January 24, 2012 while on assignment. MacNaughtan, who was best known for photographing Canadian celebrities and musicians, reportedly had a heart attack while photographing the classic rock band Rush. The band released the following statement on its Web site and Facebook page:

“We’re deeply shocked and heartbroken to learn of the sudden passing of our close friend and long-time photographer, Andrew MacNaughtan. He was a sweet person and a very talented artist. Words cannot describe how much he will be missed.”

MacNaughtan is survived by his partner, Alex Kane Privitera; parents, Neil and Barbara MacNaughtan; sister Sarah and her husband Nino Curcione; brother Alex and his wife Dorothy MacNaughtan; and uncle and aunt, Phillip and Samantha Curcione.

January 5th, 2012

Photographer Eve Arnold Dies, Age 99

© Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos. Photo: Eve Arnold with Marilyn Monroe during filming of The Misfits.

Magnum photographer Eve Arnold, recognized for her stories about the ordinary lives of the poor and downtrodden all over the world as well as for her unvarnished portraiture of Marilyn Monroe and other celebrities, has died in London. She was 99.

Arnold took up photography in the late 1940s, and first studied under Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research. From the start, she defied boundaries, documenting a fashion show in Harlem–then a segregated ghetto–for a school assignment an assignment. That led to a long to a long-term documentary project about the Black Power movement. She attracted the notice of Henri Cartier-Bresson, and in 1957, she became the first female photographer to join Magnum Photos in the US (Inge Morath had previously joined Magnum’s Paris office).

To read the full obituary, including reflections on her work by Arnold herself and comments by Magnum member Susan Meiselas, see our news story on PDNOnline. (more…)

December 16th, 2011

The Biggest Photo News Stories of 2011

Over on PDNOnline we’ve gathered together the biggest photography news stories of 2011, a year marked infringements on the rights of photographers, by sticky legal cases whose results will be felt long into the future, and by tragedy. The 15 stories we highlighted were the most-read news articles and blog posts on PDNOnline and PDN Pulse this year.

Which of these stories do you think was the most important news story of the year? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

October 20th, 2011

Obituary: Rock and Roll Photographer Barry Feinstein, 80

© Columbia/photo by Barry Feinstein

Barry Feinstein, who covered Bob Dylan’s 1966 tour after the musician went electric, and also photographed the covers of iconic albums by Dylan, Janis Joplin, George Harrison and Eric Clapton, died today at his home in Woodstock, New York, the AP reports. He was 80.

His agent, Dave Brolan, told the AP that Feinstein had been hospitalized for an infection.

In his career in the entertainment business, Feinstein worked as an assistant at Columbia Pictures, and eventually photographed stars like Steve McQueen and Judy Garland. He got to know Dylan’s manager Albert Grossman, and photographed the cover of Dylan’s 1964 album “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” In 1966, Feinstein photographed Dylan on tour after the musician began playing electric guitar, to the chagrin of many loyal fans of his folk music. On that tour, Feinstein took the well known photo of Dylan in the back of a limo while fans peer through the window at him.

© Capitol/ photo by Barry Feinstein

Feinstein also photographed the album covers for Janis Joplin’s “Pearl” and George Harrison’s “All Things Must Pass.” Feinstein rock and roll images were used in director Martin Scorcese’s  No Direction Home, about Dylan, and the recent HBO documentary about George Harrison.

He is survived by his wife, Judith Jamieson, and his two children.

Rolling Stone magazine is running a nice slide show of some of Feinstein’s most famous and intimate photos on its web site, rollingstone.com.

October 19th, 2011

AP Photographer Ed Reinke Dies After Assignment Injury

AP photographer Ed Reinke died yesterday, two weeks after sustaining head injuries from a fall while covering an auto race at a racetrack in Sparta, Kentucky, according to the Associated Press. Reinke was 60 years old, and had been an AP photographer for more than 25 years.

Details of the accident, which occurred on October on October 2, are sketchy. AP declined to provide further information.

“We’re not sure what happened to him. It’s been a big mystery,” says John Flavell, photo editor of The Daily Independent of Ashland, Kentucky and a long-time professional acquaintance of Reinke’s. “I’m sure somebody’s looking into what happened, and eventually that will come out.”

Santiago Lyon, director of photography at AP, described Reinke as “a first-rate professional with an extraordinary knack for being in the right place at the right time to get the picture.”

Reinke covered news and sporting events in Kentucky, including every Kentucky Derby since 1988. He also covered major sporting events outside the state such as Super Bowl and World Series championships, Summer and Winter Olympics, Masters and PGA championships, and the Indy 500. Major news events he covered included President Bill Clinton’s first inauguration and Hurricane Andrew.

Reinke began his career in 1972 at the Cincinnati Enquirer, according to the AP obituary. He went to work for the AP in 1979. Four years later he returned to the Enquirer and served as director of photography. In 1987, he returned to the AP, where he continued to work until the time of his death.

He is survived by his wife and two sons.

October 6th, 2011

Steve Jobs: Visionary, Inventor, and Very Challenging Photo Subject

©Doug Menuez/Getty Images

The media is heaping accolades on Apple founder Steve Jobs, who died yesterday of cancer at the age of 56. Tributes have poured in from all over the world. Jobs was a  visionary who changed the way we use and interact with technology. The iPhone and iPad have certainly helped re-make the photography landscape.

But Steve Jobs also had a reputation among photographers for being a difficult subject–and not just run-of-the mill difficult, but the archetype of difficult.

“It was the joke among photographers. He was like the nightmare subject,” says San Francisco photographer William Mercer McLeod, who photographed Jobs on assignment a total of five times, and once worked for Apple, helping to develop the company’s Aperture software.

Asked to recount his experiences photographing Jobs, another photographer said,  “I don’t really want to be the guy who pans iGod during this hour of national mourning!”

Photojournalist Ed Kashi, who photographed Jobs about 10 times between the early 1980s and early 1990s, recalled via text message, “He was one of the most difficult subjects I ever dealt with during my Silicon Valley years but I appreciated his awareness of identity, setting and message of the images. There was one time I had to get a picture with him and Ross Perot and when Jobs acted up Perot turned to him and like a stern parent said ‘Steve, Grow up!!’ No matter how dreadful he could be as a subject, I am deeply saddened by his early departure.”

McLeod says his first encounter with Jobs was as an assistant for Kashi. “It was in the late 80s. [Jobs] walked into the the photo shoot and started moving the lights around. Then he picked up the phone and called the art director in New York and said he wanted to do something different.”

McLeod recalls how he and Kashi stood there watching in disbelief. “He’s the only person I ever saw do that,” McLeod continues. “Photographing Steve was like a dance. He had such a thing for control like nobody I’ve ever seen. He loved to be in charge. He wanted to have his say.”

“From an editor’s standpoint he could be difficult,” says Scott Thode, a former Fortune magazine photo editor. “[He was] not unlike a political candidate. The main difference is that he had a real sense of design and how things can look.”

Doug Menuez spent more time photographing Jobs than just about any other photographer, after Jobs agreed to let him document the development of the NeXT computer. Menuez had access to the labs and boardroom for three years.

“In all those years, Steve only screamed at me at the top of his lungs once,” Menuez recalls. It was in 1988, when Fortune hired Menuez to shoot a portrait of Jobs for the cover of the magazine. Menuez wanted to photograph him in the NeXT offices, on a staircase that Jobs had commissioned architect I.M Pei to design. Jobs arrived for the shoot, looked at what Menuez had in mind, “then [he] leaned in and says, ‘This is the stupidest fucking idea that I’ve ever seen.’ Right in my face, like  5 or 6 inches away,” Menuez says. “I felt like I was 10 years old. He went off on a tirade. He said, ‘You just want to sell magazines. ‘And I said, ‘And you want to sell computers.’ And at that he said, ‘OK,’ and sat down.

Menuez concludes, “ I’ve been in war zones, but I like to say that I became a man learning how to stand my ground with Steve.”

Albert Watson, who photographed Jobs just once for a portfolio of people in power that Fortune commissioned him to shoot in 2006, had a different experience from other photographers. “The one thing I insisted on was that we have a three hour window of set up time,” Watson says. “We were prepared…we set up to make [every shoot] as greased lightning fast as possible for the [subject].’ Watson says he had also read “a massive amount of stuff” about Jobs to help him conceptualize the shoot, and so he would be able to converse with Jobs intelligently.

When Jobs walked in, Watson says that his power, charisma and genius were palpable. “It was like when Clint Eastwood walks in to the room.”

Jobs didn’t look immediately at Watson, but looked instead at the set-up and then focused on Watson’s 4×5 camera “like it was something dinosauric,” Watson recalls, “and he said, ‘Wow, you’re shooting film.”

“I said, ‘I don’t feel like digital is quite here yet.’ And he said, ‘I agree,’ then he turned and looked at me and said, ‘But we’ll get there.’”

Jobs gave Watson about an hour–much longer than he ever gave most photographers for a portrait session. “I had wanted to do the shot in a minimalistic way because I knew that was going to suit him very well. He said, ‘What do you want me to do?’ I said I would like 95 percent, almost 100 percent of eye contact with the camera, and I said, ‘Think about the next project you have on the table,’ and I asked him also to think about instances where people have challenged him.

“If you look at that shot, you can see the intensity. It was my intention that by looking at him, that you knew this guy was smart,” Watson says, adding, “I heard later that it was his favorite photograph of all time.”

Apple cleared its home page today to post that photograph as a tribute to Jobs.

(correction: an earlier version of this story said Fortune commissioned Albert Watson to photograph Steve Jobs in 2008. The date was actually 2006.)