You are currently browsing the archives for the Nikon category.

March 2nd, 2015

The New Gear from WPPI 2015

 

D7200_18_140_front34r-1024x874

The WPPI Show kicked off this week in Las Vegas with a few new products. You can follow all the gear news from WPPI here. Here’s a look at some of the highlights:

Nikon D7200

An update to the company’s D7100, the APS-C (DX format) camera boasts a 24.2-megapixel CMOS sensor with no optical low pass filter. It will offer a more generous buffer and faster processing than its predecessor, enabling the D7200 to shoot at 6 frames per second for up to 18 14-bit RAW files (up from the D7100′s six), 27 12-bit RAW images or 100 JPEGs. Drop the camera into 1.3x crop mode and you can bump continuous shooting up to 7 fps.

You’ll enjoy a native ISO range of 100 to 25,600 with an option to expand beyond this range to 51,200 and 102,400 when shooting in black-and-white.

The D7200 also sports a 51-point autofocus system that uses Nikon’s new Advanced Multi-CAM 3500II DX high-density system to keep your subjects in focus. There are 15 cross-type sensors to pin down moving subjects, with a center point that works down to f/8. Shutter speeds range from 1/8,000 sec. to 30 sec. with a bulb mode available for longer exposures. The shutter is rated for up to 150,000 cycles.

In a first for Nikon, the D7200 has both Wi-Fi and NFC so you can quickly pair the camera with mobile devices to share images and remotely control the camera.

Nikon’s Picture Control settings are now available in live view mode and can now be previewed in real-time on the camera’s 3.2-inch display. There are a pair of SD card slots and you’ll enjoy 1,110 shots per charge from the camera’s battery, according to CIPA standards.

On the video front, the D7200 records 1080p video at up to 30 fps or up to 60 fps when in 1.3x crop mode. You’ll have Auto ISO sensitivity in manual mode for the first time to control exposure transitions without altering shutter speed or aperture. There are also zebra stripes to alert you to over-exposed highlights during video recording.

The D7200 ships in April and is available for pre-order now for $1,200 (body) or $1,700 (with AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens). (more…)

February 10th, 2015

Nikon D810A Captures the Heavens in a New Light

D810A_14_24_front34r.lowNikon will release a special version of its D810 DSLR, the D810A, that has been modified for astro-photography applications.

The D810A incorporates a modified infrared cut filter that lets the camera capture the red hydrogen alpha gas emissions from stars and nebulae. According to Nikon, the camera is four times as sensitive to light on the 656 nanometer wavelength, enabling it to capture celestial details that would otherwise be missed by conventional digital cameras.

The D810A will also feature a new long exposure manual mode that will deliver exposures as long as 15 minutes. For exposures longer than 30 seconds in live view mode, the camera also offers a Virtual Exposure Preview Mode, which generates a preview of the image on the camera’s display.

To enjoy the full benefits of the D810A, the camera will need to be mounted to a telescope and Nikon cautions that the camera is not recommended for Earth-bound subjects. The D810A is due in May though a price has not been finalized.

In other Nikon DSLR news, the company will release a “filmmaker’s kit” for its D750 DSLR. The kit will combine the camera body, the AF-S NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G ED lens, the AF-S NIKKOR 85mm f/1.8G lens and the AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G lens. You’ll also find two additional EN-EL15 batteries, an ME-1 Stereo Microphone, one Atomos Ninja-2 External Recorder, and Tiffen 67mm and 58mm Variable Neutral Density Filters (8-Stops). 

The filmmaker’s kit ships at the end of this month for $4,000.

 

January 5th, 2015

Nikon Adds D5500 DSLR, Telephoto Lens at CES

D5500_BK_55_200_frttopAfter a year spent filling out its advanced full-frame DSLR lineup, Nikon came to CES 2015 ready to entice advanced amateurs with the new D5500.

The camera sports a 24.2-megapixel DX format (APS-C-sized) sensor with no optical low pass filter and a native ISO range of 100 to 25600. It was built using the same monocoque design approach responsible for the D750′s relatively light-but-tough build.

It’s capable of burst speeds up to 5 frames per second in JPEG and RAW and sports a 3.2-inch, vari-angle touch screen display. Video can be recorded at 1920×1080 at up to 60 fps and Nikon has carried over the flat picture control setting, stereo microphone and audio inputs from the D750.

The D5500′s autofocus system features 39 points with nine cross-type sensors.

D5500_BK_18_55_LCD_3

Rounding out the feature set is Wi-Fi and a battery rated for 820 shots by CIPA.

The D5500 will sell body-only for $900 beginning in February. Throw in an 18-55mm kit lens and you’ll pay $1,000. Nikon will also sell a kit that bundles an 18-140mm lens for $1,200.

Joining the D5500 will be a new 3.6x zoom lens. The AF-S DX 50-200mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR II ($350, February) offers three stops of Vibration Reduction and a silent wave motor.

Nikon will also replace its 300mm f/4 lens in February with the new AF-S Nikkor 300mm F/4 E PF ED VR lens. It uses a phase fresnel design that helps to shed a full pound and a half of weight and 30 percent of size vs. the earlier generation lens. It has an electro-magnetically controlled diaphragm which delivers more consistently when shooting at faster frame rates, Nikon said.

The lens’ Vibration Reduction technology offers up to 4.5 stops of correction with a sports mode and tripod detection.

The telephoto lens will retail for $2,000.

AFS_300_4E_PF

September 12th, 2014

Nikon’s New D750 Brings Several Firsts to the FX Line

D750_24_120_front34l

Nikon rolled out the pre-Photokina red carpet for its newest full frame digital SLR: the D750.

Situated between the D610 and D810, the D750 will have several firsts for Nikon’s full frame lineup including a new 24.3-megapixel CMOS sensor, Wi-Fi capability, a vari-angle LCD and a new build that makes it the thinnest DSLR in the company’s lineup.

According to Nikon, the slender build is due to its monocoque design. The body features magnesium alloy parts integrated with carbon fiber in the front and grip assembly to make a light yet weather-resistant package. The vari-angle LCD screen will be 3.2-inches in size and feature 1,229K dots for high-resolution viewing.

The D750 features a native ISO range of 100-12800 and can extend as high as 51200 or to a low of 50. It uses the same EXPEED 4 processing engine found on the D810 as well as its 91,000 pixel 3D Color Matrix Matrix III metering sensor. There’s also a highlight weighted metering option for shooting spot-lit details against black backgrounds. D750_24_120_top_2

The AF system features 51 points including 15 cross type sensors, 11 of which are compatible with teleconverter lenses shooting at f/8 or faster. The camera’s Advanced Multi-Cam 3500-FX II AF system can track objects in continuous shooting mode at the camera’s maximum burst speed of 6.5fps in either RAW or JPEG. A first for any Nikon DSLR, the D750 can lock focus on subjects in as little as -3 EV illumination.

It features a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000, shy of the D810’s 1/8000 and it’s rated for 150,000 cycles.

Nikon also added a new clarity parameter to its picture controls to adjust mid tone contrast. Like the D810, there’s also a flat picture control to deliver more dynamic range during video shoots (ideal for color grading in post-processing). All the picture controls are adjustable in .25 increments.

As noted above, the D750 is Nikon’s first FX-series camera to offer built-in Wi-Fi. Using the company’s Wireless Mobile Utility App you can  transfer images to smartphones or use mobile devices as real-time viewfinders and/or remote triggers. With the UT1 communications unit and the WT-5a wireless transceiver, you can enable wireless FTP transfers or trigger and operate the camera in HTTP mode through a web browser (where you’ll see a real-time live view preview as well as have the ability to start and stop recording).

D750_back

Video Features

When it comes to video, the D750 borrows heavily from the D810’s feature set. It offers 1920 x 1080 HD video recording with a choice of 60, 30 or 24fps with full manual control over exposure settings. The Power Aperture function gives shooters the ability to seamlessly and steplessly open and close the aperture during recording, another goodie derived from the D810.

Video is recorded to the D750’s two SD card slots and can also be simultaneously output to external recorders and monitors via HDMI.

On the audio front, there’s a built-in stereo mic, external mic input, and a headphone jack for audio monitoring.

The D750 will ship this month for $2,295, body only. A kit including the 24-120mm lens will ship in October, though pricing wasn’t announced.

More Gear

AFS_20_1.8G

In addition to the the D750, Nikon added  the AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED wide angle full frame lens to its lineup. It’s the company’s first wide angle lens with an f/1.8 aperture. It features a seven blade diaphragm, two ED elements, two aspheric elements and a 77mm filter size. It will ship in September for $799.

Finally, there will also be a new speed light in the Nikon lineup. The SB-500 has a guide number of 24 at ISO 100 and covers a 16mm angle for full frame cameras (24mm for DX sensors) with a head that swivels vertically at a 90 degree angle and rotates at 180 degrees. It incorporates a 100lux LED for video lighting and accepts a pair of AA batteries. It will also ship in September for $249 with a small stand so you can mount it to a tripod or on a table top for off-camera use.

SB500_front34r

June 26th, 2014

Nikon Unveils 36.3MP, Full-Frame D810 Pro DSLR with No Optical Low Pass Filter (Hands-on Preview)

Nikon-D810-(front)-webNikon took the wraps off its latest professional digital SLR this morning: the 36.3MP, full-frame D810, which uses no optical low pass filter (OLPF) in an effort to optimize resolution and increase sharpness and dynamic range.

We got some hands-on time with an early version of the Nikon D810, which is designed to replace both the D800 and D800E models from 2012.

The 35mm-sized, CMOS chip in the Nikon D810 has the same resolution as the sensors in the D800/E models, but a Nikon representative we spoke with during our hands-on time with the camera said it has been “newly designed.”

He stopped short, however, of calling it a brand new chip.

The Nikon D810 will go on sale in late July for $3,299.95 (body only), which is about $300 more than the D800 debuted at in 2012, but the same price as the D800E. The first two images of the D810 in this story were shot during our hands-on time with camera; the rest were provided by Nikon.

Read more of this story about the Nikon D810 and see more images here.

March 5th, 2014

New Pro Cameras and Lighting Gear Debut at WPPI Show in Las Vegas

Nikon-D4S-1I’ve been pounding the WPPI show floor in Las Vegas this week for our sister publication, Rangefinder magazine, covering what’s new in the world of photography gear. Here’s a rundown of some of the highlights from WPPI, which saw quite a few new pro cameras debut in the U.S. at the show.

Follow the links for the full posts on Rangefinder’s blog, Photoforward.

(more…)

February 24th, 2014

Nikon Announces Details for New 16.2MP D4S Flagship Full-Frame Digital SLR

Nikon-D4s_58_1.4_front-1Nikon unveiled its new D4S flagship digital SLR tonight, which seems, on paper, to be a minor upgrade to the previous model. (PDN was pre-briefed on the Nikon D4S, under NDA, prior to tonight’s launch but we were not given any hands-on time with the camera.) Like the D4, which was introduced in 2012, the new D4S uses a 16.2-megapixel, FX-format (full-frame) sensor, which Nikon describes as “newly designed.”

The revamped imaging chip in the D4S has an expanded ISO range, going all the way up to ISO 409,600 (Hi-4), which should be able to let it capture visible subject matter in near total darkness for forensic photography and other scientific applications. That extremely high ISO range could also, potentially, have photojournalistic applications such as war photography when flash is not permitted or advisable.

The Nikon D4S also has a new EXPEED 4 image processing engine designed to cut down on image noise when shooting at high ISOs in low light, and for better HD video quality and improved overall performance speed. The Nikon D4S can shoot at 11 frames per second with full autofocus (AF) and auto exposure (AE). (The previous camera could shoot at 11fps but AF and AE were locked on the first frame.) Nikon says the D4S has an “overall 30% increase in processing power.”

The Nikon D4S first premiered, under glass, at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas in January, but details about the camera were not officially announced until tonight.

Read the rest of this story and see more photos of the new Nikon D4S here.