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September 6th, 2012

Getty Names 2012 Editorial Grant Winners: Four Photographers and Chris Hondros Fund

© Kosuke Okahara

Photojournalists Bharat Choudhary, Kosuke Okahara, Paolo Marchetti and Sebastian Liste have been named the winners of Getty Images’ 2012 Grants for Editorial Photography. They will each receive $20,000 to support ongoing documentary projects.  Getty Images also announced it was awarding a grant of $20,000 to the Chris Hondros Fund. Created in memory of photographer Chris Hondros, who was killed in Libya in April 2011, the non-profit Chris Hondros Fund seeks to raise awareness of issues facing those who report from conflict zones and to support photojournalists through grants and scholarships.

The Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography have been awarded annually since 2005. The mission of the grants is “to enable emerging and established photojournalists to pursue projects of personal and editorial merit, focusing attention on significant social and cultural issues.” Photographers do not have to be affiliated with Getty Images to be considered.

Among this year’s winners are photographers who plan to use a variety of media in their projects:

Bharat Choudhary has spent two years documenting the lives of young Muslims in America and Great Britain in his series “The Silence of Others.” He next plans to document the experience of Muslim youth in France.

Kosuke Okahara’s “Fragments/Fukishima” looks at the devastation wrought by the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power in Japan in March 2011. Kosuke says his two goals now are to “to try and identify what this disaster truly means to the world through imagery and audio interviews. The second is to collect the fragments of Fukushima for future generations.”

Paolo Marchetti’s “FEVER-The Awakening of European Fascism” looks at the growing number of followers of the extreme right in Europe. He plans to use the grant to document this issue in the UK, France, Spain and Hungary.

Sebastian Liste’s “The Brazilian Far West” looks at inequities in Brazil, where 4 percent of landowners control 80 percent of the arable land. Liste, who was selected for PDN’s 30 this year, plans to use his grant to “create a multimedia map of the origin of inequality and violence in Brazil through photography, video and interviews.”

The judges for the 2012 grants were:  Whitney Johnson, Director of Photography, The New Yorker; Kira Pollack, Director of Photography, TIME Magazine; Jean-Francois Leroy, Director, Visa Pour l’Image;  Barbara Griffin, Senior Vice President of Image Management, Turner Broadcasting Systems and Stephanie Sinclair, Photographer, VII.

More information on the Getty editorial grants can be found on the Getty Images web site.

* Photo, above: Police officers at a checkpoint in the town of Namie, which is 27km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power point. © Kosuke Okahara.

Related Articles:
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Grant

The Year in Photography: Kosuke Okahara on Fukishima

August 29th, 2012

The Aftermath Project Now Accepting 2013 Grant Applications

The Aftermath Project announced the opening of its 2013 grant cycle, which comes with a $20,000 prize. The deadline for applications is November 5, 2012.

The goal of The Aftermath Project is to support photography projects that document what happens after a conflict has ended. The conflict can be any type of fighting that affects communities, ranging from an international war or regional battle to an ethnic strife or urban riot. Also of interest are stories that are being under-reported by mainstream media. According to application guidelines, “grant proposals should reflect an understanding of this mission.”

The 2013 grant winner and four finalists will be featured in the book War is Only Half the Story, Volume Seven, the foundation’s annual publication. The Aftermath Project has received a $15,000 matching grant from the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) for the book and will be launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise the rest of the funds in September.

A $20,000 NEA matching grant has also been received for a re-design of theaftermathproject.org. Founder and artistic director, Sara Terry, noted in a press release that the revamped Web site will offer more resources, and better feature the work of current and past grant winners and finalists. Terry also shared the news that Gretchen Landau is joining The Aftermath Project as managing director. Landau will focus on the foundation’s fundraising and outreach initiatives.

To download a grant application, visit theaftermathproject.org.

To learn more about projects that have been awarded the grant in the past, read our interviews with The Aftermath Project’s 2012 grant winner, Andrew Lichtenstein, and 2011 grant winner, David Monteleone.

 

July 2nd, 2012

Alexia Foundation Launches Documentary Grant Focused on Violence Against Women

In an effort to bring attention to violence against women, The Alexia Foundation has launched The Women’s Initiative, a $25,000 grant that will support a photographer working on documenting abuse against women within the United States. The grant is available to photojournalists using still images or a combination of stills and video.

Since 1991, The Alexia Foundation has given $700,000 in grants to professional and student photographers  creating picture stories that advance social change and “further cultural understanding and world peace.” Having previously supported several photography projects on women’s issues and violence against women, this year The Alexia Foundation chose to launch a new grant focusing specifically on stories about abuse against women.

The Women’s Initiative grant is open to photographers worldwide, however only individual applicants may apply; no collaborations are allowed. Instead of focusing on just the artist’s portfolio, judging will be based upon the artist’s written proposal. Proposals should demonstrate an effective ability to convey a story that is concise and focused on women’s abuse and the ability to execute that story with powerful images.

A written proposal with a maximum of 750 words explaining the idea for a project that will increase overall knowledge of women’s abuse, a  portfolio of 20 photographs plus captions, a resume, and a 25 word summary that explains the main idea of the project is required. While published proposals are welcome, unpublished works are preferred; the judges will also consider proposals from photographers who want to expand previously published work.

Judging the entries will be divided into two rounds.  Initially, the Alexia photojournalism advisory board, the Alexia Board and its executive board will review each portfolio and narrow down the applicants to a group that demonstrate strong storytelling skills. In the second round a set of judges will determine a winner based upon the applicants’ proposals and photography.

The winning applicant will be notified October 1 via email and will then have six months to complete their proposed work.  At the conclusion of the initiative in the fall of 2013, The Alexia Foundation and Syracuse University will co-sponsor a conference to display the artists’ findings and discuss the growing issue of violence against women.

The deadline to apply is August 15.  To learn more information visit www.alexiafoundation.org/grants.

-Erica Siciliano

June 15th, 2012

The Ian Parry Scholarship: Deadline to Apply June 30

The deadline to apply for the Ian Parry Scholarship 2012, which supports photography students and young photographers launching their careers, is June 30.

The scholarship was created memory of Ian Parry, a photojournalist who died while on assignment for The Sunday Times in 1989. Longtime friend and photo editor Aidan Sullivan created the  Scholarship for young photographers who are either currently enrolled in a full-time photography classes or are under the age of 24, to help them receive support and launch their career.

This year, the winner will be awarded $4,500 towards their assignments and the opportunity to be automatically added to the list of finalists for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam.

In addition to the first place prize, $630 will be awarded to those who receive the Highly Commended and Commended honor. One finalist will get a sponsorship from Save the Children, and will be given an all-expense paid opportunity to complete an assignment for the charity. An exhibit, featuring the 2012 finalists’ work and single images from the competition, will be held at Getty Images Gallery/ 46 Eastcastle Street in London. The prize-winning photographers will also gain support from Getty Images, Canon Europe and Sunday Times Magazine, who will all publish the finalists’ work.

Past winners of the Ian Parry Scholarship have included Sebastian Liste, Rasel Chowdhury, Leonie Hampton, Ivor Prickett and Jonas Bendicksen.

All applicants must submit a portfolio of their work and a brief summary of the project they undertake if chosen. Applicants can apply here, on the IanParry.org web site.

June 4th, 2012

W. Eugene Smith Grant Deadline Extended

The deadline to apply for the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography has been extended from May 31 to June 8. The grant supports a photographer whose past work and proposed project, as judged by a three-person jury, follows the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s concerned photography and dedicated compassion. In addition to the grant of $30,000, an additional $5,000 in fellowship money will be given to one or more finalists at the discretion of the jury.

Past recipients of the Smith grant include Krisanne Johnson, Darcy Padilla, Paolo Pellegrin, Lu Guang and Stanley Greene.

Instructions for applying can be found on the web site of the Smith fund.

Related stories:

Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W. Eugene Smith Grant

$30K W. Eugene Smith Grant Awarded to Darcy Padilla

 

May 21st, 2012

Curator Deborah Willis to Judge 2012 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

Photo historian, professor and curator Deborah Willis will be the judge for this year’s CDS/Honickman First Book Prize, sponsored by The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University and The Honickman Foundation. The winning photographer will receive a $3,000 grant and publication of a book of photographs, an exhibition at the Rubenstein Library Gallery at Duke University and inclusion in a Web site devoted to past winners of the award. American and Canadian photographers who have never published a book-length work before are eligible to enter. Applications will be accepted from June 15 through September 15.

Submissions to the First Book Prize are first screened by a committee lead this year by Kimerly Rorshach, director of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke. According to the FAQs on the First Book Prize Web site, the focus of the competition is on “the breadth and nuance of the body of photographs as an extended narrative and meditation.” The committee’s selection is then turned over to this year’s judge.

Willis is on the faculty of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and has published such books as Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present; Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present; The Black Female Body in Photography; and Obama: The Historic Campaign in Photographs. Previous judges for the First Book Prize include photographers Robert Frank, William Eggleston and Mary Ellen Mark.

Past winners of the prize have included Benjamin Lowy, Jennette Williams, Danny Wilcox Frazier, and Larry Schwarm.

Guidelines for entries can be found at the First Book Prize web site.

April 25th, 2012

Upcoming Grant and Contest Deadlines

There are several deadlines on the horizon for notable grants and contests. They include big-money prizes that support personal and documentary work or emerging photographers, plus some worthy photo contests, open to photographers in all genres, organized by old friends of PDN.

Moving Walls 20: deadline April 30
Open Society Foundations are now accepting photographers’ proposals for Moving Walls, the group photography exhibition featuring “in-depth and nuanced explorations of human rights and social issues,” especially those issues on which the Open Society is currently working. The Moving Walls photographers receive a $2500 honorarium, and the exhibition will be displayed at the Open Society Foundations’ offices in New York and Washington, DC in early 2013.
www.soros.org/initiatives/photography/focus_areas/mw/guidelines

W. Eugene Smith Grant:  deadline May 31
The W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography supports a photographer whose past work and proposed project, as judged by a panel of experts chaired by PDN‘s Lauren Wendle, follows the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s concerned photography and dedicated compassion. The grant in 2012 will be $30,000.
http://smithfund.org/

ASMP New York Image 12: deadline May 1
The New York chapter of the American Society of Media Photographers is sponsoring the Image 12 contest, open to both professionals and student photographers. The winners will be featured in an exhibition in New York, and two first place student winners and one first place pro winner will also be featured in an ad in Photo District News. Five judges, including  PDN’s editor, will select the winners.
www.asmp.org/image11/rules.php

OjodePez/Photo Espana Award for Human Values: deadline May 10
OjodePez, the documentary photography magazine, is offering a 3,000 euro prize for photographers doing documentary work “in which human values such as solidarity, ethics, dedication or justice stand out.” In addition to prize money, the winning work, selected by an international panel of judges (including photo editors at Le Monde, The Guardian Weekend magazine and the Israel Museum of Jerusalem) will be featured in the September issue of OjodePez and may be featured in an exhibition.
www.ojodepez.org/premio

Burn Magazine Emerging Photographer Grant: deadline May 15
The Emerging Photographer Grant supports the continuation of a photographer’s ongoing personal project, whether it’s artistic or journalistic. A jury of photographers has not yet been chosen to select the winners and runners up, but past judges have included Gilles Peress, Eugene Richards, Susan Meiselas, Maggie Steber and James Nachtwey. Past winners have received $15,000 in grant money, supported by the Magnum Foundation.
www.burnmagazine.org/emerging-photographer-grant/

Photo Center NW Photo Competition Exhibition: deadline May 18
The non-profit Photo Center NW is now seeking entries for its 17th annual Photo Competition Exhibition, to be judged by collector and author W.M. Hunt. The first, second and third prize winners of the juried exhibition receive $1,000, $500 and $250.
pcnw.org

Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for International Photography 2012 Grant: deadline May 31
The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation is seeking global and social documentary reportage. Now in its second year, the $5,000 grant supports work covering covering issues such as health, poverty, oppression, war, famine, migration and immigration. For information, click on the “Grant 2012″ tab on http://mrofoundation.org/

City of Levallois Photography Award: deadline May 18
The winner of the City of Levallois Photography Award receives a 10,000 euro grant and an exhibition at the Photo Levallois festival, which takes place in October and November in France. Note: The prize is only open to artists under the age of 35.
www.photo-levallois.org/en/

Santa Fe Workshop Contest: late deadline April 30
The semi-annual Santa Fe Photography Contest honors photographers in all genres, and offers more than $15,000 worth of prizes including tuition for Santa Fe Workshops, gear and cameras. The jurors include PDN‘s photo editor. The early deadline has past, but the final submission deadline is April 30.
www.santafeworkshops.com/contest/

Related Articles:

Call for Entries: LUCEO Student Award

Inaugural Photoville Event in Brooklyn to Feature 35 Exhibitions, Unique Photo Installation (and a dog run)

April 20th, 2012

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

© chrishondrosfund.org

Anniversaries like today are difficult, in part because they remind us how the people we mourn died, not how they lived.

To bring some good out of tragedy, the families and loved ones of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died a year ago today in Misrata, Libya, asked that gifts in their memories be made to charities and funds that continue the work to which they gave so much of their energy and time. These memorials have already resulted in scholarships and other good works that continue their legacies and remind us of the commitment that inspired their careers.

 

© timhetherington.org

After his death, the family of Tim Hetherington selected three charities that he supported:

Human Rights Watch, the independent organization dedicated to defending and protecting human rights; Hetherington was documenting the humanitarian crisis in Libya for Human Rights at the time of his death: hrw.org

Milton Margai School for the Blind in Sierra Leone,
a school where Hetherington photographed and worked with students (and set up a pen-pal exchange) who had been intentionally blinded by the Revolutionary United Force: www.miltonmargaischool.org

Committee to Protect Journalists,the non-profit organization which since 1981 has promoted press freedom around the world by protecting and defending journalists from fear of reprisal: cpj.org

In addition, Hetherington’s parents, Judith and Alistair Hetherington, are now setting up a non-profit foundation in the UK and US “to help students, artists and those in need here and in the developing world, so that his commitment to highlighting the truth and humanitarianism will continue.” Information is available on timhetherington.org.

Hondros’s fiancée, Christine Piaia, and his friends and colleagues at Getty Images set up The Chris Hondros Fund to support aspiring photographers and raise public awareness about the contributions of photojournalists: www.chrishondrosfund.org.

The first of the Chris Hondros scholarships was given last fall at the Eddie Adams Workshop (which Hondros had attended) to photographer Enrico Fabian. At the same ceremony,  the Tim Hetherington Memorial Award was given to photographer Dominic Bracco II.

The first Tim Hetherington Grant, administered by Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo, was awarded last year to Stephen Ferry to support his long-term documentary project on the effects of the guerilla war in Colombia.

In more recent news, the first session of the Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC), a free first-aid course for journalists covering conflict, began in New York City this week.  The program was started by Hetherington’s friend and frequent collaborator, writer Sebastian Junger. Supported with donations from ABC News, National Geographic, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast, Getty Images and the Chris Hondros Fund, RISC training programs will also be held in London and Beirut. (Information can be found at  risctraining.org/)

The goal of the program is to train more journalists so that, if needed, they could help colleagues injured in the field.

Helping journalists help journalists: That seems like a fitting tribute as we remember two colleagues who gave so much to their community. Of course, we’ll still be thinking of them, and all who mourn for them, long after this one-year milestone has passed.

Related Articles:
Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop

Hetherington, Hondros Loved Ones Choose Memorial Charities


Stephen Ferry Wins First Tim Hetherington Grant

Free Conflict-Training Course Now Accepting Applications

http://pdnpulse.pdnonline.com/2012/03/free-conflict-training-course-now-accepting-applications.html

Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington: A Reflection

March 28th, 2012

Call for Entries: LUCEO Student Project Award

The LUCEO Images photo collective have announced the call for entries for their third annual Student Project Award, which awards a full-time graduate or undergraduate student $1,000 to be used in the completion of a long-term photography project.

The winner will be selected by a panel of judges led by AARP director of photography Michael Wichita. The award winner will be announced in June at LOOK3: Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, VA.

The award also includes a one-year mentorship with a LUCEO member of the winner’s choice.

Masud alma Liton, a Bangladeshi student, won the inaugural student project award in 2010 for his project on sex workers in Bangladesh, and Ohio University student Maddie McGarvey won the 2011 award for her project about grandparents raising their grandchildren.

Applications are due by midnight on May 10.

For more information and to apply, visit the LUCEO Student Project Award site.

March 2nd, 2012

Justin Maxon Wins $15,000 Alexia Foundation Grant

San Francisco-based photographer Justin Maxon has won the 2012 Alexia Foundation professional grant. Maxon will use the $15,000 grant to complete a project exploring “the frightening reality of how many murders go unsolved every year in America.”

The Alexia Foundation supports photojournalism that explores issues of social justice and cultural awareness. It was founded by Peter and Aphrodite Tsairis, in memory of their daughter, Alexia, who was killed in the bombing of a Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988.

In addition to Maxon’s award, a Judges Special Recognition Award was granted to Rome-based photographer Kathryn Cook, whose project “Memory of Trees” explores “the aftermath of the ‘denied’ 1915 Armenian Genocide in Ottoman Turkey” and life for Armenians in Turkey today.  Katie Orlinsky won the first place award in the student category: Funding to complete her project on Mexico’s drug war and a three-month internship at MediaStorm. Orlinsky is currently studying at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism as Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism Fellow.  Oxana Onipko won the second place student prize, funding for her project on violent conflicts in Russia’s North Caucasus Republic of Dagestan. Onipko is a student at the Rodchenko School of Photography and Multimedia.

The judges for the 2012 grants were Kira Pollack, director of photography at Time; Whitney Johnson, director of photography at The New Yorker; and photographer Maggie Steber.

Information on the 2012 grants, including the Awards of Excellence winners, can be found at www.alexiafoundation.org.