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April 3rd, 2013

2013 Grants and Awards Announced by CENTER

"Son magnifique champ de fleurs," from "Gaijin," © David Favrod. Courtesy CENTER.

“Son magnifique champ de fleurs,” from “Gaijin,” © David Favrod. Courtesy CENTER.

CENTER, the Santa Fe nonprofit whose mission is to aid photographers and promote their work, has announced the winners of two grants and a series of awards.

The Project Launch Grant, which aids a photographer in completing and disseminating a fine-art or documentary project and carries an award of $10,000, was given to David Favrod for his series “Gaijin.” The work explores the displacement Favrod experiences as a result of feeling he belongs neither where he grew up, in Switzerland, nor where he was born, in Japan. The grant was judged by Library of Congress Curator Verna Curtis, COLORS Magazine Photo Editor Mauro Bedoni, and Pier 24 exhibition space Director Christopher McCall.

The Project Development Grant, which supports a photographer’s work-in-progress with an award of $5,000, went to Ignacio Evangelista for his project “After Schengen,” a series of landscapes of disused border checkpoints in Europe. The grant was judged by Denise Wolff, Aperture books program senior editor.

CENTER received more than 1000 entries for the grants from photographers around the world, the organization said in a statement.

CENTER’s Choice Awards give a curator, editor and gallerist an opportunity to recognize the work of photographers with exhibition, publication and portfolio review opportunities, among other prizes. (The winners of the two grants mentioned above are also offered exhibition, publication and portfolio review opportunities.)

For the Curator’s Choice Award, curator Tina Schelhorn of the Kolga Tblisi Photo organization recognized Marc Asnin for his long-term project about his drug-addicted uncle. For the Editor’s Choice Award, Vanity Fair Photography Director Susan White recognized Jennifer McClure for her series about her personal struggle for meaning. For the Gallerist’s Award, Pace/McGill Gallery Director Lauren Panzo recognized Bryan Schutmaat for his documentary series on old mining towns in the American West.

The winning work was selected from submissions that totaled 6,000 images, and which came from 43 countries, CENTER said.

For galleries of work by the winners and runners up visit the CENTER site here.

March 22nd, 2013

Upcoming Deadlines for Grants, Fellowships Up to $10,000

It’s officially spring. Deadlines for some big grants are approaching.

Inge Morath Award
Administered by the Magnum Foundation, the Inge Morath Award of $5,000 is given annually to a female photojournalist under the age of 30. The Award supports the completion of a long-term documentary project, and is juried by Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.
Deadline: April 30.
www.ingemorath.org/index.php/2013/01/the-inge-morath-award-2013-guidelines/

Getty Grants for Editorial Photography
Starting April 1, Getty will be accepting applications for its 2013 Grants for Editorial Photography. Five grants of $10,000 each will be awarded to photojournalists “pursuing projects of personal and journalistic significance.” Deadline: May 1.
imagery.gettyimages.com/getty_images_grants/overview.aspx

The Aaron Siskind Foundation
The Aaron Siskind Foundation offers grants of up to $10,000 each to individual photographers, selected by a panel of judges. The entry fee is $10.  Applications are open to US citizens and legal permanent residents 21 years of age and older, and there is no requirement regarding subject matter, genre or process, except that the work must involve photography (no video).  Deadline: May 24.
aaronsiskind.org/grant.html

W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography
Each year the W. Eugene Smith Fund awards a grant (in 2012, the award was $30,000) to a photographer whose past work and proposed project follow the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s concerned photography and dedicated compassion. The board of trustees of the W. Eugene Smith Fund appoints a three-member jury to evaluate written proposals and photos. There is a $50 application fee. Deadine: End of May.
smithfund.org/eugene-smith-grant

March 1st, 2013

Abir Abdullah, Sara Naomi Lewkowicz Win 2013 Alexia Foundation Grants

Workers line up unclaimed bodies of victims of on accidental fire in a mass funeral at a grave at Jurain in Dhaka, Bangladesh. ©Abir Abdullah

Workers line up unclaimed bodies of victims of on accidental fire in a mass funeral at a grave at Jurain in Dhaka, Bangladesh. ©Abir Abdullah

Abir Abdullah of Bangladesh has won the $15,000 professional award in the Alexia Foundation grant competition, organizers announced this morning.

Sara Naomi Lewkowicz won the Alexia Foundation Student Grant, which includes a full-tuition scholarship to study photojournalism at the Syracuse University London Program in Fall, 2013, plus a $1,000 grant.

Click here to read the full story.

 

February 27th, 2013

Tips for Applying for Fellowships and Competitions: Free Seminar

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund and the Aperture Foundation are sponsoring a panel discussion called, “Strategies for Photographers: Thoughts On How To Apply For Fellowships and Other Competitions,” to be held Monday, March 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the Aperture Foundation in New York City. The event will be free and open to the public.

The panelists, all former head jurors for the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography, will share their experiences judging grants and competitions, including the W. Eugene Smith Grant, World Press Photo, the Getty Images grants, PDN contests and others. The participants are David Friend of Vanity Fair, collector W.M. Hunt, Marcel Saba of Redux Pictures and Lauren Wendle of Photo District News.

The panel will follow the press conference announcing the call for entries to the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant. Entries for the competition are due by end of May.

For more information on the panel, or the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund Grant, visit the W. Eugene Smith Fund website.

Related Articles
Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Proposal: Krisanne Johnson’s Coming of Age Story

December 14th, 2012

Open Society Announces 2012 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Foundations (OSF) has announced the winners of its 2012 Audience Engagement Grants. The annual grants, which vary in dollar amounts, support documentary projects that propose to go beyond using photography to raise awareness of issues, and “take a more direct role in making change happen.” Each photographer partners with an organization to present the work to new audiences and engagement them in effecting political or social change. For the first time in the history of the grant, all the projects are located in the United States.

The 2012 winners are:

Emily Schiffer, in partnership with the Center for Urban Transformation and Magnum Foundation:
“See Potential” (Chicago, Illinois)
“See Potential,” profiled in PDN’s Community issue (see “Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: See Potential”) uses banners created using documentary photographs captured in South Side neighborhoods to promote four urban revitalization projects in the Englewood and Bronzeville neighborhoods. Neighbors are asked to show their support for the projects via text message.

Robin Bowman, in partnership with The American Teenager Project: “The American Teenager Project” (Richmond, California)
Robin Bowman will work with local arts organizations, high schools, and advocacy groups in Richmond, California—such as Community Leaders Organizing Undocumented Dreamers (CLOUD) to create an exhibition, curriculum and storytelling workshops, and a program to train youth and teachers to be ambassadors for the program who will stimulate youth engagement on civil and human rights issues.

Joseph Rodriguez, in partnership with New America Media: “Re-entry Stories” (Richmond and San Jose, California)
Joseph Rodriguez will train journalism students and youth reporters fro Santa Clara University and the University of California, Berkeley, as well as reporters from New America Media’s youth media hubs to sensitively and accurately document the stories of people re-entering society after incarceration and create multimedia presentations. Their work will be featured alongside Rodriguez’s “Re-entry in Los Angeles” and shown at forums to strengthen advocacy for criminal justice reforms in California.

Jon Lowenstein, in partnership with Trans-Border Institute: “Escondido en Escondido” (Escondido, California)
Jon Lowenstein will provide faith leaders and religious youth groups in Escondido, California, with tools and training to document and address immigration issues and promote community integration. The resulting images will be combined with Lowenstein’s “Shadow Lives USA” and distributed in Escondido as a newsprint handout; additional content will be available to readers using an augmented reality browser, Junaio.

The winning proposals were selected this year by Claudine Brown (former Director of the Arts and Culture Program, Nathan Cummings Foundation and currently Assistant Secretary for Education and Access, Smithsonian Institution); Stephen Ferry (photographer and past Audience Engagement Grant recipient); and Wendy Levy (co-founder, Sparkwise and Senior Strategist, Tomorrow Partners). Fred Ritchin (Professor, Photography & Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University).

Related Articles:

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Jon Lowenstein’s Guggenheim Fellowship

AmericanPoverty.org: Addressing America’s Invisible Problem (founded by Steve Liss and Jon Lowenstein)

Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: See Potential

October 17th, 2012

Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Peter van Agtmael has been named the winner of the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant in Humanistic Photography. Van Agtmael, a Brooklyn, New York photographer represented by Magnum Photos, plans to use the grant to work on “Disco Night September 11.” The project will explore the lives of people affected by the American-lead wars that followed the terrorist attacks of September 11, including people in Afghanistan and Iraq, and refugees in the U.S., Europe, and especially other countries in the Middle East. The grant was announced at a ceremony in New York, October 17.

Massimo Berruti of Italy received the $5,000 W. Eugene Smith Fellowship for his project, The Dusty Path, which looks at violence and political corruption in Pakistan.

Jury chair Lauren Wendle, president and publisher of Photo District News (a Smith Fund board member), Kira Pollack, director of photography at Time, and writer and curator Susan Bright selected the grant and fellowship winners from entries received from more than 43 countries.

For more on the finalists for the W. Eugene Smith Grant and the winner of the Howard Chapnick Grant, see our news story on PDNOnline.

Photo: © Peter van Agtmael/Magnum Photos. Caption: Pech Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan, 2007. “A number of strays hung around Patrol Base California, waiting for food and company. Usually the soldiers welcomed them. But I was told that a few weeks earlier, when one of the dogs urinated on a soldier’s cot, he and his buddies shot the dog to pieces.”

Related Articles
$30K W. Eugene Smith Grant Awarded to Darcy Padilla

Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W. Eugene Smith Grant

October 1st, 2012

Two Photographers Receive $500,000 MacArthur “Genius” Fellowships for 2012

Photographers An-My Lê and Uta Barth are among the 23 artists, scientists, social scientists and scholars named MacArthur Fellows for 2012. Commonly called the “genius” grant, the fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation awards $500,000 over the course of five years to people who have made outstanding achievements in their field. There is no application process, nominations are secret, and recipients can do as they please with the “unrestricted” grant.

Lê, 52, who was born in Saigon and now teaches at Bard College, is best known for her series “Small Wars,” about amateur battle reenactments and simulated battles used to train soldiers.

Conceptual photographer Uta Barth, 54, creates atmospheric images that use blur and light to explore perception. Last year the Art Institute of Chicago exhibited her latest series, titled “…and to draw a bright white line with light.”

Photographers who have won past MacArthur Fellowships include Robert Adams (1994), Susan Meiselas (1992), Faizal Sheikh (2005) and Lynsey Addario (2009).

September 21st, 2012

W. Eugene Smith Grant Winner to be Announced October 17

The W. Eugene Smith Fund will announce the winner of its 33rd annual W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography and the Howard Chapnick Grant for the Advancement of Photojournalism at a ceremony on October 17 in New York City. The Fund has extended an open invitation to attend the event.

The program will include presentations of photo essays by this year’s grant recipient and fellowship winners, a tribute to the work of W. Eugene Smith, an announcement of the grant finalists and the presentation  of the 2012 jurors’ discretionary grant.

The keynote speech will be given by Kimberly Dozier, correspondent for AP and author of Breaking the Fire.

The ceremony takes place at 7pm (doors open at 6:30) at the School of Visual Arts Theatre in New York. For details on the ceremony, the Smith Grant and Howard Chapnick Grant, visit the Smith Fund blog: http://smithfund.org/blog

September 6th, 2012

Getty Names 2012 Editorial Grant Winners: Four Photographers and Chris Hondros Fund

© Kosuke Okahara

Photojournalists Bharat Choudhary, Kosuke Okahara, Paolo Marchetti and Sebastian Liste have been named the winners of Getty Images’ 2012 Grants for Editorial Photography. They will each receive $20,000 to support ongoing documentary projects.  Getty Images also announced it was awarding a grant of $20,000 to the Chris Hondros Fund. Created in memory of photographer Chris Hondros, who was killed in Libya in April 2011, the non-profit Chris Hondros Fund seeks to raise awareness of issues facing those who report from conflict zones and to support photojournalists through grants and scholarships.

The Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography have been awarded annually since 2005. The mission of the grants is “to enable emerging and established photojournalists to pursue projects of personal and editorial merit, focusing attention on significant social and cultural issues.” Photographers do not have to be affiliated with Getty Images to be considered.

Among this year’s winners are photographers who plan to use a variety of media in their projects:

Bharat Choudhary has spent two years documenting the lives of young Muslims in America and Great Britain in his series “The Silence of Others.” He next plans to document the experience of Muslim youth in France.

Kosuke Okahara’s “Fragments/Fukishima” looks at the devastation wrought by the meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power in Japan in March 2011. Kosuke says his two goals now are to “to try and identify what this disaster truly means to the world through imagery and audio interviews. The second is to collect the fragments of Fukushima for future generations.”

Paolo Marchetti’s “FEVER-The Awakening of European Fascism” looks at the growing number of followers of the extreme right in Europe. He plans to use the grant to document this issue in the UK, France, Spain and Hungary.

Sebastian Liste’s “The Brazilian Far West” looks at inequities in Brazil, where 4 percent of landowners control 80 percent of the arable land. Liste, who was selected for PDN’s 30 this year, plans to use his grant to “create a multimedia map of the origin of inequality and violence in Brazil through photography, video and interviews.”

The judges for the 2012 grants were:  Whitney Johnson, Director of Photography, The New Yorker; Kira Pollack, Director of Photography, TIME Magazine; Jean-Francois Leroy, Director, Visa Pour l’Image;  Barbara Griffin, Senior Vice President of Image Management, Turner Broadcasting Systems and Stephanie Sinclair, Photographer, VII.

More information on the Getty editorial grants can be found on the Getty Images web site.

* Photo, above: Police officers at a checkpoint in the town of Namie, which is 27km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power point. © Kosuke Okahara.

Related Articles:
Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund Grant

The Year in Photography: Kosuke Okahara on Fukishima

August 29th, 2012

The Aftermath Project Now Accepting 2013 Grant Applications

The Aftermath Project announced the opening of its 2013 grant cycle, which comes with a $20,000 prize. The deadline for applications is November 5, 2012.

The goal of The Aftermath Project is to support photography projects that document what happens after a conflict has ended. The conflict can be any type of fighting that affects communities, ranging from an international war or regional battle to an ethnic strife or urban riot. Also of interest are stories that are being under-reported by mainstream media. According to application guidelines, “grant proposals should reflect an understanding of this mission.”

The 2013 grant winner and four finalists will be featured in the book War is Only Half the Story, Volume Seven, the foundation’s annual publication. The Aftermath Project has received a $15,000 matching grant from the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) for the book and will be launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise the rest of the funds in September.

A $20,000 NEA matching grant has also been received for a re-design of theaftermathproject.org. Founder and artistic director, Sara Terry, noted in a press release that the revamped Web site will offer more resources, and better feature the work of current and past grant winners and finalists. Terry also shared the news that Gretchen Landau is joining The Aftermath Project as managing director. Landau will focus on the foundation’s fundraising and outreach initiatives.

To download a grant application, visit theaftermathproject.org.

To learn more about projects that have been awarded the grant in the past, read our interviews with The Aftermath Project’s 2012 grant winner, Andrew Lichtenstein, and 2011 grant winner, David Monteleone.