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April 14th, 2016

Bryan Denton Wins Fifth Annual Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund Award

American photojournalist Bryan Denton has won the fifth annual $20,000 Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund (CHF) Award, and fellow photojournalist Kiana Hayeri has also been awarded the $5,000 emerging photojournalist grant, Getty Images announced today. The awards will be presented at a reception at the Aperture Gallery in New York on May 4.

Bryan Denton for The New York Times

© Bryan Denton for The New York Times

The CHF award was established to honor the work and celebrate the legacy of photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed in April 2011 while on assignment covering the Libyan civil war. The four previous CHF Award winners were Kevin Frayer, Daniel Berehulak, Andrea Bruce, and Tomás Munita.

Denton has been based in Lebanon, Beirut since 2006 and has completed assignments in the Middle East, Africa, South East Asia and Afghanistan for The New York Times, Newsweek, TIME, The Wall Street Journal and more. He was previously selected as a finalist by the CHF in 2013.

“I was lucky enough to have been friends with Chris, which makes this accolade a bittersweet motivation to keep pushing my work forward, and to do so with the kindness, grace and spirit that Chris embodied both in his work and in life,” Denton said in a prepared statement.

Hayeri, who was born in Iran and migrated to Toronto as a teenager, won the emerging photojournalist grant for work exploring topics such as migration and adolescence.  Her work has appeared in publications including Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Monocle, and The Washington Post.

Jurors for the 2016 CHF awards included Getty Images vice president of news Pancho Bernasconi, New York Times photographer Todd Heisler, freelance photojournalist Jeff Swensen and CHF board president Christina Piaia, who was engaged to Hondros at the time of his death.

Related Stories:

Kevin Frayer Wins Fourth Annual Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Chris Hondros’s Testament

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

March 30th, 2016

Berehulak, McIntyre Win NPPA Photojournalist of the Year Honors

Bishnu Gurung (C) weeps as the body of her daughter, Rejina Gurung, 3, recovered from the rubble of her earthquake destroyed home, lays covered by cloth during her funeral on May 8, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. Neighbours discovered the body of the small girl in the rubble of the entrance of the family home, ending a 13 day search for Rejina in the remote mountain side village of Gumda in Gorkha district. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

Bishnu Gurung (center) weeps as the body of her daughter, Rejina Gurung, 3, recovered from the rubble of her earthquake destroyed home, lays covered by cloth during her funeral on May 8, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. Photo © Daniel Berehulak.

The National Press Photographer’s Association (NPPA) has named Australian photographer Daniel Berehulak the Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets) and Scott McIntyre, a Kentucky native, as the Photojournalist of the Year (Small Markets).

Berehulak, who has been shooting since 2000 and was named Photographer of the Year by POYi last year, is based in New Delhi though he has worked in Nepal, Liberia, Antarctica, and was more recently on assignment in Brussels to cover the aftermath of the terrorist bombings. “I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to connect with people and to share their stories to the world,” Berehulak told News Photographer magazine.

McIntyre has been working in Naples, Florida since 2011 and credits the variety of the stories in his portfolio for his win. “This year’s portfolio was a very ‘Florida’ portfolio, different than the ones I’ve entered before,” he told News Photographer. “It’s got Florida’s colors, its beaches, its characters and senior citizen love… it’s unique compared to my portfolios of the past.”

Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets) runners up were Marcus Yam of the Los Angeles Times, and  Christoffer Hjalmarsson of Expressen. Runners up for Photojournalist of the Year (Small Markets) were Rachel Mummey of The Herald in Dubois County, Indiana, and Gerry Melendez of The State in Columbia, South Carolina.

In other categories, Al Bello of Getty Images has won 2016 Sports Photojournalist of the Year. Photographers from Getty Images swept the category, with Patrick Smith taking second, and Matthias Hangst taking third place.

Mary F. Calvert of ZUMA Press won Cliff Edom’s “New America Award” for her long-term documentary project “Missing In Action: Homeless Women Veterans.” Runners up were Brian Cassella of the Chicago Tribune (whose work was recently covered in PDN), and Jim Lo Scalzo of European Pressphoto Agency.

A full list of winners has been posted by the NPPA and can be found here.

Judges for the competition were  NPPA past president Clyde Mueller; Harry E. Walker, visuals director of Florida’s Naples Daily News; John Agnone, a former senior editor for National Geographic; and Brooke LaValley, a staff photojournalist for the Columbus Dispatch.

Olga Riano wipes tears from her eyes as she and her fellow newly naturalized American citizens sing along to the song, "Proud To Be An American," by Lee Greenwood during a Naturalization Ceremony for 51 people from 20 different countries at Hodges University in Naples on Thursday, November 12, 2015. "It's my big day," said Riano, who's originally from Colombia, "I'm happy to be in this country. I'm free."

Olga Riano wipes tears from her eyes as she and her fellow newly naturalized American citizens sing along to the song, “Proud To Be An American,” by Lee Greenwood during a Naturalization Ceremony for 51 people from 20 different countries at Hodges University in Naples on Thursday, November 12, 2015. Photo © Scott McIntyre.

 

March 25th, 2016

Eli Durst Wins 2016 Aperture Portfolio Prize

Photographer Eli Durst has won the 2016 Aperture Portfolio Prize for his series “In Asmara.” The prize, which includes $3,000 and an exhibition at Aperture Gallery in New York, is intended to identify trends in contemporary photography and highlight artists whose work deserves greater recognition, according to Aperture. Past winners include LaToya Ruby Frazier, Michal Chelbin, and Bryan Schutmaat.

From Eli Durst's series, "In Asmara," Aperture Portfolio Prize winner.

From Eli Durst’s series, “In Asmara.” Photo © Eli Durst.

“In Asmara” documents Durst’s time visiting the capital city of East African country Eritrea. The city is renowned for its large collection of intact modernist buildings, however, Durst’s series documents the life going on around the buildings—a trash dump, a table set for dinner, the backseat of a car.

Runners up for this year’s prize are Bill Durgin, Sean Thomas Foulkes and RaMell Ross. Their work will be featured on Aperture’s website. They will also have the opportunity to participate in the Aperture Foundation limited-edition print program.

Durst grew up in Texas and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2011. After college he assisted photographer Joel Meyerowitz and worked at the fine-art printing studio Griffin Editions. He is currently pursuing an MFA in photography at the Yale School of Art.

 

March 23rd, 2016

Magnum Foundation Announces 2016 Emergency Fund Grants

Just Like Us, Ghana. Emergency Fund grant photo. Photo © Eric Gyamfi.

Henry visits Jay, Ghana. Photo © Eric Gyamfi.

Eighteen photographers from around the world have been awarded the 2016 Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund, a grant that helps independent photographers produce in-depth and creative stories on underreported issues.

Grantees were selected by an independent editorial committee from a pool of 140 photographers nominated by 26 international editors, curators, and educators.

The grantees are:

Poulomi Basu, Endia Beal, Injinaash Bor, Alejandro Cegarra, Chien-Chi Chang, Joana Choumali, Jordi Ruiz Cirera, Nadege Mazars, Thomas Dworzak, Danny Wilcox Frazier, Ziyah Gafic, Brigitte Grignet, Eric Gyamfi, Yael Martinez, Showkat Nanda, Katie Orlinsky, Prisiit Sthapit and Angelos Tzortzinis.

A total of $138,000 will be dispersed among the grantees, the highest amount given in a single year in the Emergency Fund grant’s seven-year history. This year, the grants are made in collaboration with the Prince Claus Fund, which “channels support where cultural expression and creative production are limited or restricted,” according to the Prince Claus Fund.  The collaboration has allowed the Emergency Fund to support more projects.

The issues this year’s grantees are covering include teen culture and generational shifts within Mongolian society; the refugee crisis in Europe; the LGBT community in Ghana (above); and experiences shared by African-American women in the workplace, among other topics.

“I anticipate this group of visual artists will produce transcendent and extraordinary photography in 2016 and well beyond,” said photo editor James Wellford, editorial committee member, in a statement about the grant.

To see last year’s list of Emergency Fund Grant winners and descriptions of their projects, click here.

Related:

Two-Minute Interview: Katie Orlinsky on Subtle Emotion vs Shocking Violence

PDN Video Pick: Office Scene (“Today, I’m going to let them touch me”) by Endia Beal

Alejandro Cegarra: PDN’s 30 2015

Katie Orlinsky: PDN’s 30 2013

Ziyah Gafic: A Forensic Documentary of Genocide (For PDN subscribers; login required)

March 16th, 2016

Gideon Mendel Wins $50,000 Pollock Prize for Creativity

Gideon Mendel has won the inaugural Pollock Prize for Creativity, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation announced today. The South African photographer, who for the last nine years has been working on an ongoing project about climate change called “Drowning World,” has been awarded a $50,000 cash prize.

Jeff and Tracey Waters, Staines-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK. From Gideon Mendel for Pollock Prize

“Jeff and Tracey Waters, Staines-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK,” from “Drowning World.” Photo © Gideon Mendel.

The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, which safeguards the artistic legacies of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, initiated the Pollock Prize to support outstanding mid-career artists working in painting, sculpture, works on paper and printmaking, or photography.

“It’s a huge honor to receive this award named after Jackson Pollock, an artist I’ve always loved for his freedom in breaking barriers. Because my own work increasingly straddles the border between art, documentation and activism, it’s all the more important to me that the prize is given not for photography but for creativity in general,” Mendel said in a statement released by the foundation.

Mendel has previously covered the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa and elsewhere. His work has been exhibited in museums and shows including the ICP Triennial in New York and published in magazines including National Geographic, Rolling Stone and more.

The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, has made more than 4,100 grants to individual artists in 77 countries, says foundation chairman and CEO Charles Bergman. The grants have totaled more than $65 million. The new Pollock Prize for Creativity will be given annually by a foundation jury based on the recommendations of a network of nominators.

December 22nd, 2015

Nina Berman Wins 2016 Aftermath Grant For Project on War’s Toxic Legacy

Nina Berman has won the 2016 Aftermath Project Grant for “Acknowledgment of Danger,” a look at the “toxic legacy of war on the American landscape.” Berman, a documentary photographer, has published two books: Purple Hearts—Back from Iraq (2004), on wounded veterans; and Homeland (2008), a look at surveillance and paranoia in post 9/11 America. Sara Terry, photographer and founder of The Aftermath Project, announced the news on social media today.

The Aftermath Project, a nonprofit, supports the production of projects on “the lingering wounds of war” and communities recovering from conflict. Past winners of the Aftermath Project Grant include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Justyna Mielnikiewicz. In August 2015, Terry announced the 2016 grant would be the last the organization would offer “for the time being.” In the coming year, the organization will “concentrate on our tenth anniversary and strategize our way forward.”

In addition to naming the 2016 grant winner, the judges also chose several finalists:

Juan Arredondo for his project, “Everybody Needs a Good Neighbor,” about the challenges faced by ex-combatants transitioning back to civilian life in Colombia, as the nation prepares for a historic peace agreement between the government and FARC in March, 2016.

Bharat Choudhary for his project, “The Silence of Others,” which examines the aftermath of the war on terror and its disastrous psychological impact on young Muslims living in the West.

Paolo Marchetti for his project “FEVER: The Awakening of European Fascism,” which documents the growing racial intolerance – exacerbated by the economic crisis and by political ideologues – expressed by many young people reacting against the massive flow of immigrants to Europe.

Brian McCarty for his project, “War Toys,” a conceptual art/photography project. With the help of expressive therapists, McCarty works with the children to make narrative photographs that recreate their experiences using locally found toys.

The judges for the 2016 grants were Terry; Denise Wolff, an editor with Aperture; photographer (and former Aftermath Project board member) Jeff Jacobson; photographer Maggie Steber; and Elizabeth Rappaport, a photographer and Aftermath Project board member.

Related Articles
Project on Ukraine Wins $20,000 2015 Aftermath Grant

Post 9/11 War Business Projects Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects (interview with Sara Terry)

December 3rd, 2015

Fund Your Work: Photojournalist Yunghi Kim Offering Ten $1,000 Grants

Photojournalist Yunghi Kim is offering ten grants of $1,000 each “to emphasize the importance of copyright registration [and] to give back to the profession of photojournalism,” she recently announced on her website.

Kim explains that she is funding the one-time grants “from fees recovered from unauthorized use of my work.”  Only US-based freelance photojournalists who were members of the Photojouralists Cooperative group on Facebook as of November 25, 2015 are eligible for the grants. Interested photographers must email a 300-word essay to Kim by December 20, explaining why they want the grant.

“This money can be to start, further or finish a project, or to help alleviate a financial hardship,” she explains. “Make an honest, compelling case concisely and in 300 words.”

Kim will judge the applications and select the winners along with Jeffrey Smith, director of Contact Press Images, the agency that represents Kim. Winners will be announced December 25.

Additional details are available on Kim’s website.

Related:
Fund Your Work: Manuel Ortiz Foundation Seeking Project for $5,000 Documentary Grant
Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions
How (And Why) to Make Copyright Registration Part of Your Workflow (for PDN subscribers)

December 2nd, 2015

Fund Your Work: Manuel Ortiz Foundation Seeking Projects for $5,000 Documentary Grant

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film is accepting proposals for their $5,000 grants for a documentary photo project and a short documentary film. The deadline to enter is March 31, 2016.

© Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation/photo by Pablo Ernesto Piovano

© Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation/photo by Pablo Ernesto Piovano

The Foundation awards one $5,000 grant to a photo project concerning pressing social issues “such as health, poverty, oppression, war, famine, religious/political persecution and similar topics.” Photographers can apply for support for either new or continuing projects by submitting a 15-image portfolio, written proposal, CV and other supporting documents. The 12 shortlisted portfolios will be displayed during the Rencontres d’Arles festival in France in 2016. The winner must complete the proposed project within a year of receiving the grant.

The 2015 recipient of the Grant was Pablo Ernesto Piovano of Argentina, for his project on the human cost of the widespread use of herbicides in agriculture in Argentina.

The Foundation is also offering a new, $5,000 grant to support what it calls “Short-short Documentary Film.” Filmmakers can submit samples of their field work and proposals for producing films “highlighting human unrest, forgotten communities, over-exploited people and environments impacted by war, poverty, famine, disease, exploitation and global distress.”

A full list of guidelines for both grants are available on the website of the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation.

Related Articles
Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions

How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects

Mary Virginia Swanson’s Tips on Funding Your Photo Project

October 24th, 2015

PPE 2015: Mary Virginia Swanson’s Tips on Funding Your Photo Project

In her seminar “How to Fund Your Long-Term Project” at PhotoPlus Expo, Mary Virginia Swanson shared a variety ideas for researching and securing support from government, corporate and philanthropic entities. Swanson, a consultant, author and the executive director of the LOOK3 festival, encouraged photographers to think about everything they need to finish a project, and to achieve their goals: These valuable assets can include not only cash, but also access to subjects, paper or printing, publicity for an exhibition. Whether support in these areas from a lab that donates printing, the chamber of commerce that publicizes an event or or a local bank that helps pay for an exhibition, Swanson recommended thinking about what value your project can offer to the supporter. “Would putting their logo on an exhibition or book be of value?,” she asked. Consider the visibility the funder might want: “Do your funders the courtesy of thanking them,” on the wall of the exhibition, on invitations, and on your website.

Swanson noted that many photographers are applying for the same grants, fellowships, and government-supported arts programs, so they need to broaden their search for funding. She divided funders into two camps: Those interested in supporting you, and those interested in supporting the subject of your project. The people interested in supporting you are limited to “your fan base and your family.” Support for your subject matter, she said, “comes from like-minded, passionate people.” These may include strangers, who are likely to ask, “Is there a tax deduction in this for me?”

Funders who want tax deductions are unlikely to write a check to individuals, however, so photographers may benefit from partnering with a fiscal agent. Fiscal agents provide artists a connection to a 501 c 3 nonprofit, and can funnel your donations to you; they typically handle administration in exchange for a percentage of your donations. Fractured Atlas, Blue Earth Alliance (which works with artists devoted to environmental issues) and NYFA (New York Foundation for the Arts) are three fiscal agents who work with photographers.

Swanson gave a quick primer on researching family foundations and corporate philanthropies. Many companies devote pages of their websites to topics such as “corporate responsibility” or “the community,” and provide information on the charities and causes they support. “They’ll be giving [to a cause] because it supports the community they function in or serves the families of their employees.” Target, for example, funds arts education.

The Foundation Center has a searchable database of grant-making organizations, which is available online and at hundreds of satellites the Foundation Center supports around the country in local libraries and community centers. The database provides information on each philanthropy’s mission, the causes it supports, and also access to its most recent 990 tax form, where nonprofits list exactly how much money they gave in the course of a year, and to whom. By paying for a subscription to the Foundation Center’s database, users can also search for grants and funders by subject matter or area of interest.

In considering whether to try crowd-funding, Swanson said, “You have to weigh if you want to take a month off from working to work on your crowd-funding.” She noted that Kickstarter has an extensive reach, can attract enormous traffic and donations to the campaigns its staff chooses to highlight, and provides users useful information about traffic and donations. She also noted, however, that if a crowdfunding campaign fails to reach its goal, it remains on the Kickstarter site forever “as a failed project.” Swanson recommended looking at the projects that failed before writing or recording your own pitch for a crowd-funding campaign. After looking at pitches that failed, Swanson said, “I promise you, you’ll make your video differently.”

Related Articles
Advice on Funding Your Photo Project

How to Win Grants for Your Photo Projects

Mary Virginia Swanson Named New Executive Director of LOOK3

September 4th, 2015

Getty Awards $10,000 Grants to 5 Photographers

From "Zanan," by Mojgan Ghanbari. ©Mojgan Ghnabari

From “Zanan,” by Mojgan Ghanbari, winner of a 2015 Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography. ©Mojgan Ghanbari

The winners of the 2015 Getty Grants for Editorial Photography are Souvid Datta, Salvatore Esposito, Javier Arcenillas, Mojgan Ghanbari and Matt Eich, according to an announcement yesterday from Getty Images. Each of the five photojournalists will receive a grant of $10,000, as well as editorial support from Getty, to pursue “projects of personal and journalistic significance,” the agency says.

Those projects include “Sonagachi: Vanishing Girls,” by Souvid Datta, about the red light district of Songachi, Kolkata; “What Is Missing,” Salvatore Esposito’s examination of the social and political dynamics underlying street crime in Naples; “Latidoamerica,” a project about atrocious gang violence in Central America by Javier Arcenillas; “Zanan,” Mojgan Ghanbari’s project about the lives of Iranian women; and “Carry Me Ohio,” Matt Eich’s look at everyday life in the economically distressed regions of southeast Ohio.

Getty says it received nearly 400 applications from 78 countries for this year’s grant competition. Jurors for the competition were photo editor Cheryl Newman, Sunday Times Magazine director of photography Jon Jones, Der Spiegel international director of photography Matthias Krug, Paris Match director of photography Romain Lacroix, and Visa pour l’Image director Jean-Francois Leroy.

In announcing the winners, Getty also announced that one of the Getty Images Editorial Grants will be renamed The David Laidler Memorial Award, in honor of the former Getty employee and veteran photo editor who founded the grants. Laidler died of cancer on August 11 at the age of 48.

Related:
Advice on Funding Your Photo Project