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April 2nd, 2014

Alexia Foundation, Open Society Calling for Submissions

The Alexia Foundation and the Open Society Foundations separately announced calls for submissions from photographers yesterday.

The Alexia Foundation issued a call for entries for its 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant, which will provide a $25,000 grant for the production of a project “on a significant issue involving and affecting women,” the foundation said in its announcement.

“Unlike the first Women’s Initiative grant, which specifically focused on abuse of women in the United States, this call for entries is intended to permit the photographer to propose a serious documentary photographic or multimedia project encompassing any issue involving women anywhere in the world,” the foundation says.

The deadline for grant applications is June 30, 2014. More details are available at the Alexia Foundation website.

Meanwhile, The Open Society Documentary Photography Project is calling for photo projects for an upcoming group exhibition on surveillance. The exhibition will include the work of five or six photographers, according to Open Society Foundations (OSF).

The deadline for applications is May 1, 2014.

“We are seeking photo-based projects that explore surveillance-related issues from a variety of perspectives. We encourage applicants to interpret the theme broadly,” OSF said in the announcement.

Called Moving Walls 22: Watching You, Watching Me: Photography in an Age of Surveillance, the exhibition is scheduled to run from October 29, 2014, to May 2015 at Open Society Foundations–New York. See the OSF website for complete application information.

March 26th, 2014

Magnum Foundation Awards 10 Emergency Fund Grants

© Oscar B. Castillo

© Oscar B. Castillo

The non-profit Magnum Foundation today announced the winners of its 2014 Emergency Fund Grants, which help photographers investigate and complete stories on critical but under-reported issues. This year’s winners will look at a variety of social and political topics in nine countries. The 2014 EF Grantees and their stories are:
Oscar B. Castillo: “Our War, Our Pain,” Venezuela
Qinggang Chen: “Patients at Muli County,” China
Edmund Clark: “Unseen Spaces of the Global War on Terror,” USA/Afghanistan
Carolyn Drake (with Ashley Cleek):  “Invisible Bus,” USA
Zann Huizhen Huang: “Remember Shatila,” Lebanon
Kai Löffelbein: “Death Metals, Indonesia
Laura Morton: “Wild West Tech,” USA
Ed Ou: “North,” Canada
Alessandro Penso: “Refugees in Bulgaria,” Bulgaria
Christian Werner: “Depleted Uranium – The Silent Genocide,” Kosovo

Magnum Foundation has also announced its newest Human Rights Fellows. The fellowships allow photographers from non-Western countries to participate in the six-week photography and human rights program organized by Magnum Foundation and the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, a program designed to focus students on strategies for visual storytelling in their own countries.

The 2014 Fellows are:
Mohammed Elshamy, 19, Egypt
Abbas Hajimohammadisaniabadi, 30, Iran
Yuyang Liu, 22, China
Loubna Mrie, 22, Syria
Pedro Silveira, 29, Brazil
Sumeja Tulic, 28, Bosnia & Herzegovina

Related articles:
Magnum Foundation Announces 2012 Emergency Fund Grantees

PDN Photo of the Day: Laura Morton: Society Galas in San Francisco

February 5th, 2014

Pulitzer Center Releases Annual Report Highlighting Photography

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which provides funding to journalists and news organizations, allowing them to carry out independent, in-depth reporting, released its 2013 annual report today. Several projects involving photographers were among those highlighted in the report, providing a good overview of the types of work the Center is funding, and the types of projects the media is willing to publish, given the means.

They included:

Sea Change, the multimedia story on ocean acidification created by The Seattle Times and staff photographer Steve Ringman (our story about the creation of Sea Change is here.)

A series of photo stories and reports on Japan’s collapsing social safety net, including images by Shiho Fukada. (Our story on Fukada’s project on Japan’s “disposable workers” is here.)

An issue of Poetry magazine dedicated to Afghan landau poems and women’s rights, with photographs by Seamus Murphy. (For more on Murphy’s coverage of Afghanistan, beginning in 1994, see our story on his multimedia project, “Afghanistan: A Darkness Visible.”)

Documentary photographer Larry Price’s work on child labor in Philippine gold mines.

Reporting on gun violence in Chicago featuring photography by Carlos Javier Ortiz. (Our story about Ortiz’s long-term project, “Too Young to Die,” is here.)

And reporting on the perpetual conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo that includes work by photographer and filmmaker Fiona Lloyd-Davies.

Related Article: Getting Funding from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting (available to subscribers with login).

January 14th, 2014

Post-9/11 War Business Project Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

© Luca Locatelli

© Luca Locatelli

Italian photographer Luca Locatelli has won the $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for his project “United Colours of War,” which looks at the increase in business connected to war following 9/11.

The Aftermath Project also recognized several finalists, whose work will be included in War is Only Half the Story, the annual Aftermath Project publication: Philippe Dudouit for his project on rebel movements in the Sahel region of Africa; Olga Ingurazova for her work on Abkhazia; Diana Markosian for her project on young Muslim girls raised in post-war Chechnya; and Javad M. Parsa for his work about Iranian refugees living around the world.

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization founded by photographer and filmmaker Sara Terry that supports documentary photography that tells post-conflict stories. The Foundation to Promote Open Society provides funding for the Aftermath Project Grant.

Judges for this year’s grant were: MaryAnne Golon, Director of Photography, The Washington Post; Elizabeth Krist, Senior Photo Editor, National Geographic; Muriel Hasbun, Professor and Chair of Photography, Corcoran College of Art+Design; Elizabeth Rappaport, photographer, board member The Aftermath Project; Sara Terry, photographer, founder and artistic director, The Aftermath Project.

Related: What It Takes To Win An Aftermath Project Grant
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application

November 13th, 2013

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

The Open Society Foundations (OSF) has announced the winners of its 2013 Audience Engagement Grants. The annual grants, which vary in dollar amounts, supports projects that provide ways for audiences to take a more direct role in making change happen. The grantees partner with organizations to present the work. Most grantees collaborate with the communities they’ve covered to create and share the work.

The winners are:

Jason DaSilva in partnership with AXS Lab
Filmmaker Jason DaSilva, who has multiple sclerosis, and AXS Lab have created an online tool, AXS Map, which allows users to review and rate businesses’ accessibility. A new feature on their platform enables users to upload photographs when sharing feedback.

Elyor Nematov in partnership with Central Asia on the Move
Elyor Nematov, who has documented life in foreign cities for fellow Kyrgyz, is working with Central Asia on the Move to help Kyrgyz youth to understand their rights before leaving Kyrgyzstan. Nematov will exhibit his photographs in the southern cities of Batken, Jalalabad, and Osh while distributing resource guides on the legal, medical, and social services in Russia.

Peter DiCampo in partnership with Austin Merrill, the Learning About Multimedia Project, the Bronx Documentary Center, and Unchartered Digital
Photographer Peter DiCampo and his partners are creating a curriculum for New York City students using images from Everyday Africa, an online collection of cellphone images taken by photographers based in Africa. Students will learn how to document their own neighborhoods, families, and culture as they are taught media literacy, and will be able to upload images to an interactive website.

John Willis in partnership with Lakota Circle Village, Lakota Peace Making Court, and KILI Radio Voice of the Lakota Nation
Photographer John Willis and his partners are working to counter the negative effects of outsider representations of Lakota people and culture on Lakota youth. They will use images from Willis’s Views from the Reservation as a catalyst for intergenerational dialogue on what Lakota values are missing from mainstream narratives. Through community forums and storytelling workshops, youth will use elders’ knowledge of Lakota history, language, and traditions to help guide them in creating their own narratives of what it means to be Lakota today. These projects will be exhibited at community centers throughout Pine Ridge Reservation; participants will share their experiences on KILI Radio.

More information can be found on the Open Society Foundations website.

Related articles:
Open Society Announces 2012 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

October 16th, 2013

Robin Hammond Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

A mentally disabled man in Kenya, living in a locked tin shack. ©Robin Hammond

A mentally disabled man in Kenya, living in a locked tin shack. ©Robin Hammond

Photographer Robin Hammond has been awarded the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant, a $30,000 prize, to help complete his ongoing project called “Condemned–Mental Health in African Countries in Crisis.” Hammond has spent two years working on the project, which documents the mental health crisis across Africa, and the abuse and neglect of victims of mental illness.

The $5,000 W. Eugene Smith Fellowship was awarded to Javier Arcenillas for his project, “Red Note,” an examination of violence in Latin America from the perspectives of criminals, victims, and their families.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund awards its annual grant and fellowship to photographers who are pursuing long-term documentary projects in humanistic photography in the tradition of photojournalist W. Eugene Smith.

The awards were presented at the School of Visual Arts Theatre in New York this evening. Scott Anderson, who has covered conflicts for The New York Times, Outside and Esquire and and is the author of Lawrence in Arabia, gave the keynote presentation.

The Smith grant and fellowship recipients were selected by a jury, including Sarah Leen, Senior Editor, Photo Story Development at National Geographic; Ann Thomas, Curator of Photographs, National Gallery in Ottawa, Canada; and Rich Clarkson, head of Rich Clarkson and Associates, and a longtime Smith Board member.

The winners were selected from 184 entries from 42 countries.

“Robin Hammond’s Condemned is a powerful look at people balanced on the edge of life who are generally neglected, forgotten and often abused,” said juror Sarah Leen in a prepared statement. “His images, often shocking but always tender, highlight this tragedy and search for moments of hope. His work stood out among many worthy candidates.”

Finalists for this year’s grant included photographers Bharat Choudhary, Edmond Clark, Maxim Dondyuk, Sebastian Liste, Benjamin Lowy, Pierpaolo Mittica, Ebrahim Noroozi, Sim Chi Yin, and Christian Warner.

This year’s winner of The Howard Chapnick Grant, which supports photographic leadership and education, was FotoKonbit, a non-profit organization that provides photography workshops to Haitian youth and adults.  FotoKonbit will use the $5,000 grant to produce a ten-day workshop for a group of Haitian students in the fishing village of Labadie.

This year, the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund was sponsored by American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), Anastasia Photo, Canon USA, The Harbers Family Foundation, and Open Society Foundations. Additional support was provided by International Center of Photography, MediaStorm, NYC FOTOWORKS, Photo District News, School of Visual Arts, and Synergy Communications.

The Howard Chapnick Grant was co-sponsored by by Rich Clarkson and Associates LLC, NYC FOTOWORKS, and The Harbers Family Foundation.

Photographers interested in applying for the 2014 grant and fellowship can find more information on the Web site of the W. Eugene Smith Foundation here:  www.smithfund.org/apply/smith

Related stories:
Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant (for PDN subscribers)
Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W Eugene Smith Grant (for PDN subscribers)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Proposal: Krisanne Johnson’s Coming of Age Story (for PDN subscribers)

September 10th, 2013

Aftermath Project Accepting Applications for $20K Grant

Applications are now being accepted for the 2014 Aftermath Project Grant, an award of $20,000 that will be given to a photographer working on a project that explores the aftermath of violent conflict. The 2014 Aftermath Project Grant is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society.

Photojournalist Sara Terry founded the non-profit grant-making organization The Aftermath Project in 2003 with the belief that quiet stories of people rebuilding their lives after war or other conflicts have a vital role to play in how the international community understands the effects of armed conflicts on populations.

The deadline for applications is November 11, 2013, with the winner to be announced in mid-December. In addition to the grant, The Aftermath Project will also recognize four finalists, and their work will be published alongside the winners in a book, War is Only Half the Story: Vol 8.

Recent Aftermath Project grant-winners include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Davide Monteleone.

For more information and to submit an application, visit: http://theaftermathproject.org/2014-Application

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application (about Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Project Grant application)
Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant
$20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for 2012 Awarded to Andrew Lichtenstein

September 9th, 2013

World Press and Human Rights Watch Seek Applications for $26K Hetherington Grant

World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch announced today that the 2013 Tim Hetherington Grant, worth € 20,000 (approximately $26,500) is open for applications. Photojournalists working on projects with human rights themes can apply for the grant, which was established to honor the late Tim Hetherington, a photojournalist killed in a mortar attack in Libya in 2011. Applications will be accepted through October 17. The winner will be announced on November 11.

This is the third year the grant will be awarded. Previous winners include Stephen Ferry (2011) and Fernando Moleres (2012).

For more information see the press release below, or visit the World Press Photo website here: http://www.worldpressphoto.org/tim-hetherington-grant

Related: Photographer Fernando Moleres Wins 2012 Tim Hetherington Grant
Photographer Stephen Ferry Awarded First Tim Hetherington Grant

PRESS RELEASE

Amsterdam, 9 September 2013

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: TIM HETHERINGTON GRANT

World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch invite photojournalists and visual journalists around the world to apply for the third annual Tim Hetherington Grant. The grant is intended to support a photographer in completing an existing project on a human rights theme. The deadline for submissions is 17 October, and the name of the recipient of the grant will be announced on 11 November.

Managing director Michiel Munneke says: “The grant was established to celebrate Tim Hetherington’s commitment to innovative and compelling storytelling. We’re pleased that the grant has already enabled two photojournalists to take their projects to the next stage and to reach a worldwide audience. With the support of the Tim Hetherington Grant Stephen Ferry (2011) and Fernando Moleres (2012) were able to approach audiences on multiple platforms, books, booklets, newspapers, websites and exhibitions.” (more…)

September 6th, 2013

Farzana Hossen Wins 2013 Ian Parry Scholarship for Project on Violence Against Women

© Farzana Hossen

© Farzana Hossen

Farzana Hossen, a student at Pathshala South Media Institute in Dhaka, Bangladesh, has won the 2013 Ian Parry Scholarship for her project “Lingering Scars,” about the rise in violence against women in Bangladesh. Hossen receives 3,500 pounds (approximately $5,450 US), a commission from Save the Children, publication of her Project in The Sunday Times Magazine, representation from Reportage by Getty Images as part of their Emerging Talent group, and equipment from Canon. She will also becomes a finalist for the shortlist of photographers selected for Joop Swart Masterclass, conducted by World Press Photo.

Hossen has documented women injured by acid thrown at them. One of the judges for this year’s Ian Parry Scholarship, photojournalist Don McCullin, noted the strength of Hossen’s images and text. “I get a clear sense that Farzana has an invested interest in conveying the horror of these attacks.”

The award was announced at the Visa Pour l’Image festival in Perpignan, France.  One “highly commended “ photographer and two “commended” photographers were also announced. They will receive 500 pounds (approximately $780 US).

The Ian Parry Scholarship, named for the Sunday Times of London photographer who was killed at the age of 24 while covering the Romanian Revolution, supports projects by full-time photography students and photographers under 24.

The highly commended photographer, Magda Rakita, has photographed in Liberia, focusing on issues affecting women. Rakita, who was born in Poland, is studying for her masters at London College of Communications, and plans to continue her work in Liberia as the country observes the tenth anniversary of the end of its civil conflict.

One of the two commended photographers, Kazi Riasat Alve of Bangladesh, is studying in a documentary mentoring program under Saiful Huq Omi at Counter Foto. Alve’s project, “Life at Suhrawardi Uddan,” looks at a Dhaka park that has sheltered homeless people.

The other commended photographer, Mehran Hamrahi, has documenting young people in Iran, where 70 percent of the population is under the age of 35, in a project titled “Iranian People, Ordinary or Criminals?” Born in Iran in 1989, Hamrahi began studying photography in 2009. He has worked for the Iranian Students News Agency and had two solo exhibitions.

Information on the Ian Parry Scholarship, and galleries of the winners’ work, can be found at www.ianparry.org

Related article:

Adrian Fussell Wins 2012 Ian Parry Scholarship

July 10th, 2013

Photo Students and Young Photogs: Ian Parry Scholarship Applications Due August 1

Applications for the Ian Parry Scholarship, which supports current full-time photography students and young photographers 24 years of age and under, are due August 1. Details are available on the PDNEdu blog.

This year’s winner will be announced in early September, during the Visa pour l’Image Festival in Perpignan. The winner will receive a monetary award of £3,500 ($4,487) and their photos will be published in the Sunday Times magazine Spectrum and exhibited at MOTHER, London for two weeks during September 2013. Two commended photographers will also be selected for publication, exhibition and a monetary award of £500 ($640). Both the winner and commended photographers will be automatically added to the list of finalists for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam, and all scholarship finalists will be invited to attend a series of free seminars, portfolio reviews and workshops in collaboration with ad agency MOTHER, led by industry professionals who support the award.
The 2013 scholarships will be judged by Don McCullin, Tom Stoddart, Harriet Logan, Jon Jones and Simon Roberts.

Past scholarship winners have included Sebastian Liste, Maisie Crow, Jonas Bendicksen and Simon Roberts.

Related Article:
Adrian Fussell Wins 2012 Ian Parry Scholarship