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February 10th, 2015

Funding Your Long-Term Photo Project—Upcoming Award and Fellowship Deadlines

Two awards and a pair of reporting fellowships are currently seeking applications.

The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is seeking applications for reporting fellowships on the topics of health/development and religion.

IRP says that the fellowship awards will include “roundtrip air tickets to and from [fellows'] homes and destinations, but all other travel must be arranged and paid by the fellow. IRP will offer a stipend based, in part, upon the budgets that all applicants must submit.”

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until the deadline on Monday, March 16. Applicants can be freelance or staffers. For more information visit the program website.

The 5,000 Euro (approx. $5656) Alfred Fried Photography Award is seeking photographs that answer the question, “What does peace look like?” All photojournalists may enter the Austria-based award competition free of charge. The entry deadline is May 17, 2015. Visit the Fried Award website for more information.

Last but not least, the New Orleans Photo Alliance is currently accepting applications for its annual Michael P. Smith Fund For Documentary Photography award of $5,000. The award is open to photographers based on the Gulf Coast of the United States—Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Emma Raynes, Director of Programs at the Magnum Foundation, is the judge for this year’s award. Applications require a fee of $25, and are due March 30, 2015. For more info visit the NOPA website.

February 3rd, 2015

Grant Deadlines: Magnum/Inge Morath, Manuel Rivera-Ortiz and Pulitzer Center

Deadlines are coming up for grants supporting women photographers, and photographers working on social issues.

The 2015 Inge Morath Award 

© Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Inge Morath. © Magnum Photos/Inge Morath

Magnum and the Inge Morath Foundation have announced deadlines for the 14th annual Inge Morath Award: submissions must be received by April 30th, 2015.

The two foundations award $5,000 to a female photographer under the age of 30, in support of the completion of a long-term documentary project. One winner and up to two finalists are selected by a jury composed of Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.

Morath was an Austrian-born photographer who was associated with Magnum Photos for nearly 50 years. The Inge Morath Foundation was established after her death in 2002, and her colleagues at Magnum created an award in her honor.

Shannon Jensen won the last award, in 2014, for “A Long Walk.” For more information, visit ingemorath.org. All submissions must be made online at ingemorath.submittable.com/submit

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film 2015

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film has opened a call for submissions for its global grant; both professional and emerging photographers of all nationalities are encouraged to submit documentary photography projects on topics of human suffering and unrest, forgotten communities, exploited lands and people, on communities ravaged by war, poverty, famine, disease, and the exploitation of global resources.

The foundation awards one $5,000 grant to one documentary project based mostly on submitted proposal and a 15-image portfolio. Photographers must show a commitment to the field of reportage and documentary photography.

Submissions are judged in three rounds by a panel of professionals representing the documentary photography industry. The first round assesses entries based on submission worthiness; A pre-selection jury will selects the “Top-24” and consequently the “Top-12” portfolios during round two. The “Top 12″ shortlisted portfolios will be featured and displayed during Les Rencontres d’Arles in Arles, France.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2015. The selected project must be completed the calendar year following receipt of the grant. For more details, rules and submission guidelines, visit mrofoundation.org.

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting’s $150,000 Nuclear Threat Initiative Grant

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is expanding its coverage of nuclear security issues, thanks to a new grant from the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI). The Pulitzer Center plans to produce a series of stories on under-covered nuclear issues for its “Going Nuclear” gateway

The 18-month grant is worth $150,000, earmarked for nuclear security projects like “Plutonium Mountain,” a report by David Hoffman of The Washington Post and Eben Harrell of Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, which the Pulitzer Center previously funded.

The NTI is a non-partisan, nonprofit organization that has supported independent news coverage on weapons of mass destruction since its founding in 2001.

For information on Pulitzer Center reporting grants, see pulitzercenter.org/grants.

January 7th, 2015

Upcoming Grant Application Deadlines: Alexia, Center, Light Work, The Documentary Project

Application deadlines for grants worth between $1,000 and $20,000 are approaching.

Alexia Foundation Professional Grant

The Alexia Foundation’s professional Alexia Grant is meant to give professional photographers and visual journalists the means to produce bodies of work that promote world peace and cultural understanding. Both still photography and multimedia projects are eligible. The grant is administered by both the foundation and the Alexia Chair at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

Individual photographers or visual journalists from any country are eligible—proposals with multiple content producers are not accepted. Proposals for projects that have already won grants or awards of more than $1,000 in the previous calendar year are not eligible. Professional grant applications carry a $50 application fee; winners will receive $20,000 to produce their proposed project.

The application deadline for the professional grant is Monday, Jan. 29, 2015 at 5 p.m. EST. Winners will be announced on or around March 1, 2014.

For more info, go to www.alexiafoundation.org/grants.

CENTER Choice Awards

CENTER, the non-profit organization dedicated to supporting photography since 1994, recognizes outstanding photographers working in all processes and subject matter with its Choice Awards. Awards are presented in three categories: Curator’s Choice, Editor’s Choice and Gallerist’s Choice. First, second and third place prizes are awarded in each category. Choice Award winners are invited to participate in an exhibition at the Center for Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during Review Santa Fe.

This year’s jurors include Phillip Prodger, the curator at the National Portrait Gallery in London; Enrico Stefanelli, president & director of the Photolux Festival in Italy; and Alice Gabriner, TIME magazine’s international photo editor.

Last year’s Curator’s Choice winner was Manjari Sharma; Jeanine Michna-bales won the Gallerist’s Choice; and Morgan Ashcom was the Editor’s Choice.

The deadline for applications is February 19, 2015. For more information, go to www.visitcenter.org/choice-awards/#.

The Documentary Project Fund

The Documentary Project Fund has opened its first Call-For-Entries for 2015. The call is open to all still photographers, emerging or established, but applicants must demonstrate the skill level necessary to plan and execute a documentary project. Winners will have six months and up to $5,000 to complete their photographic project. The Documentary Project Fund is also available to photographers working with other nonprofits, but only if that group matches funds.

Submissions are accepted twice a year, and are judged by the board of The Documentary Project Fund. Half the funds are released upon acceptance of the award, with the second half of the funds to be dispersed at the completion of the project, contingent upon the project’s successful execution. Award announcements are made via email, approximately one month after the Call-For-Entries closes on March 30, 2015.

Previous winners include Matt Black, who won an award for his work documenting California’s Central Valley.

For more info, go to thedocumentaryprojectfund.org or send an email to info@thedocumentaryprojectfund.org.

Light Work Grants in Photography

Light Work has been offering grants to artists in Central New York since 1975, supporting more than 110 artists, some multiple times. With the stated goal of encouraging the production of new photographic works in the region, three $2,000 grants will be awarded to photographers who reside within an approximate 50-mile radius of Syracuse, N.Y.

All applicants must reside in of one of the following Central New York counties: Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Schuyler, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Tioga or Tompkins.

Applications will be reviewed by three judges from outside the grant region; decisions are based solely on the completed application and the candidate’s portfolio and. Repeat offenders are welcome—artists who won the award in 2009 or earlier are eligible to re-apply. Full-time students are not eligible.

Grant recipients will be published in Light Work’s Contact Sheet: The Light Work Annual, and are invited to participate in a special exhibit at Light Work. The deadline for applications is April 1, 2015. Apply online at lightwork.slideroom.com.

Light Work was founded as an artist-run, non-profit organization in 1973, with a mission to provide direct support to artists working in photography and related media, through residencies, publications, exhibitions, and a community-access lab facility.

For more info, go to www.lightwork.org/grants/apply or email grants@lightwork.org.

Related Article 

Chasing the Money: How to Fund a Documentary Project

 

December 19th, 2014

Project on Ukraine Wins $20,000 2015 Aftermath Grant

Justyna Mielnikiewicz has won the 2015 Aftermath Project Grant for “A Ukraine Runs Through It,” a project exploring tensions in modern Ukraine using Dnieper River as a symbolic dividing line. The $20,000 grant, offered by the nonprofit Aftermath Project, supports documentary photography that addresses the legacy of conflict.

The Aftermath Project also announced several finalists, whose work will be published in War Is Only Half the Story, the annual publication of the Aftermath Project. The finalists are:

Bruno Boudjelal, whose project, “Mapping of Massacre Sites in Algeria,” explores the sites of massacres that occurred in 1997 and 1998.

Glenna Gordon for her project, “Artifacts of a Kidnapping: The Things They Carried Home,” a survey of the objects brought home by ransomed kidnapping victims of terrorist groups around the world.

Adam Patterson for “Men and My Daddy,” a project on Northern Ireland, exploring how former terrorists function during peacetime and whether aging ex-paramilitaries find purpose in their lives.

Donald Weber for”War Sand,” a landscape and archeological project about the beaches of Normandy, which still contain particles of shrapnel from the 1944 D-Day invasion of  France during World War II.

A special discretionary grant of $2,500 was given to buy gear for two Syrian refugee teenagers, who have been photographing their lives of Syrians in refugee camps. The money will be administered by photographer Brendan Bannon, who has run UNHCR-sponsored arts education programs for children in refugee camps.

The judges for the 2015 grant were Denise Wolff of Aperture; Amy Pereira of MSNBC; Stephen Mayes, Executive Director of the Tim Hetherington Trust; Elizabeth Rappaport, photographer and Aftermath Project board member;  and Sara Terry, photographer and founder of the Aftermath Project.

Related articles:
Post-9/11 War Business Project Wins 2014 Aftermath Project Grant

Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Andrew Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Grant

November 4th, 2014

OSI Announces 2014 Audience Engagement Grant Winners, and New Funding Model

Open Society Documentary Photography Project has announced the winners of its Audience Engagement Grant Program, which supports photographers who “have gone beyond documenting a human rights or social justice issue to enacting change.” This year, Open Society Foundations offered two forms of support. The Project Development grants  gave grantees a chance to attend a workshop, organized by Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program, to learn strategies for moving their projects forward. The Project Implementation grants supported photo-based artists who, in partnership with other organizations, are using photography to engage a unique audience. Grant winners were also invited to the professional development retreat.

The grant winners in the Project Development track are:

* Nazik Armenakyan: to document women living with HIV/AIDS in Armenia.
* Paul Botes: to showcase the impact of the Lonmin Marikana Mine violence in South Africa.
* Robert Godden: to address migration policies, practices, and research in Nepal.
* Cristobal Olivares: to confront violence against women in Chile.
* Thenmozhi Soundararajan: to expose sexual violence against Dalit women in India.
* Andri Tambunan: to chronicle the rise of HIV/AIDS within indigenous Papuan communities living in Tanah Papuah.

In the Project Implementation track, the following photographers and partner organizations were named winners:

* Mario Badagliacca with the Archive of Migrant Memories (AMM) on their campaign to collect, archive, and share testimonies of migrants held in Identification and Deportation Centers throughout Italy.
* Rula Halawani with Al-Ma’mal Foundation for Contemporary Art to produce an exhibition addressing Palestinian identity and collective memory, as these relate to the natural and physical environment.
* Karim Ben Khelifa with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Open Documentary Lab, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab to create an augmented reality installation that will allow users to engage with soldiers from across enemy lines.
* Jean Melesaine with Silicon Valley De-Bug to work with California public defender offices in effectively and responsibly producing client “social biography videos” as tools for reducing sentencing and potential incarceration.
* Pete Pin with the Cambodian Association of Greater Philadelphia and Michael Weiss (of IXL Learning) to create an online platform for Cambodian Americans to share their family stories based on ephemera saved from before the war and refugee camps.
* Michael Premo and Andrew Stern with Working Films’ Reel Power Initiative to educate and mobilize communities in areas surrounding shale beds and to build public opposition to the recent lift of a ban on fracking in North Carolina.
* Brooke Singer with the Center for Health, Environment, and Justice to develop a more accessible, user-friendly Superfund365.org, a data visualization archive of the worst toxic-waste sites in the United States.

Open Society Foundations, which funds the grants, announced in April that it decided to divide its funding for projects being launched and those that are ready to implement after recognizing that “cultivating collaborations and effectively executing these projects requires significant effort, time, and strategic planning.” In announcing this year’s winners, Open Society also noted that documentary photographers have to do more to advocate for lasting change than simply raise awareness. As the Open Society Foundation’s website notes, “The 2014 grantees take on multiple and often simultaneous roles—artists, activists, advocates, and community organizers, to name just a few.”

More information on the grant winners, and some of their images, can be found on the Open Society Foundations’ website.

Related Article:

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

October 15th, 2014

Attention Photojournalists: Upcoming Grant and Prize Deadlines

Looking for support for your visual journalism? Take note of these calls for entries.

Tim Hetherington Grant
A joint initiative of World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch, the Tim Hetherington Grant is a 20,000 euro prize awarded annually to a visual journalist. The grant is intended to help photographers and filmmakers finish ongoing projects on a human rights theme. The deadline to enter is October 31. The grant was created in memory of Tim Hetherington, who was killed in April 2011 while covering fighting in Misrata, Libya. Past winners of this juried prize have included Olivier Jobard and Fernando Moleres.
www.worldpressphoto.org/tim-hetherington-grant

Photo Philanthropy Activist Awards
PhotoPhilanthropy, which connects photographers with nonprofits to drive action for social change, is now accepting entries in its 2014 Activist Awards, open to all professional and emerging photographers who have collaborated with a nonprofit organization on a photo project. The grand prize for a professional photographer is $15,000. A prize of $5,000 will be awarded to an emerging photographer. The deadline is December 3, 2014. The jury will be announced later this month.
photophilanthropy.org/award/

Open Society Moving Walls
Open Society Foundations is now accepting proposals for Moving Walls 2015, an exhibition which will open June 2015 at the Open Society Foundations’ offices in New York City. The application deadline is November 18. Moving Walls highlights long-term photo-based documentary projects addressing human rights or social justice issues in an area where Open Society is active. Open Society covers the cost of printing, travel to attend the opening, and return shipment of photos, and provides a $2,500 participation fee.
www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/moving-walls

Related Articles

Olivier Jobard Wins 2013 Tim Hetherington Grant
Liz Hingley Wins PhotoPhilanthropy Prize

September 15th, 2014

New $10K Grant Will Send Newborn Babies Home From Hospital As Photo Collectors

A new $10,000 grant to support programs that engage new audiences with photography has been awarded to Pittsburgh photographer Matthew Conboy. The photographer won the grant, which was established by the non-profit Crusade for Art, for a proposal to send newborn babies at West Penn Hospital in Pittsburgh home with signed prints from local photographers.

Conboy took his inspiration for the project from a program created by a local hospital. There, they send each newborn home with a “Terrible Towel,” the yellow towel waved by fans at Pittsburgh Steelers NFL football games.

“While I am a proud Steelers Fan, I believe that babies could be sent home with something else that could change their lives and the lives of those around them: art,” Conboy wrote in his proposal.

The jury that awarded Conboy the grant included Museum of Contemporary Photography curator Karen Irvine, Colorado Photographic Arts Center executive director Rupert Jenkins, and New Yorker photo director Whitney Johnson.

Irvine and Crusade For Art executive director Jennifer Schwartz hailed the creativity of Conboy’s idea in a press release announcing the award. “We are excited to award this grant to someone whose idea feels completely original and unique,” Irvine said.

Conboy chose 12 local photographers—including himself—to participate in the program. Their work represents a broad spectrum of photographic interests. The program will run for one year, and Conboy estimates the group of artists will send 3500 newborn babies home with an original artwork. He also hopes to expand the project to include other hospitals in the region “and beyond,” he says.

September 3rd, 2014

Mary F. Calvert Wins $25,000 Women’s Initiative Grant

From "Missing in Action: Homeless Female Veterans." © Mary F. Calvert

From “Missing in Action: Homeless Female Veterans” © Mary F. Calvert

Photographer Mary F. Calvert has won the Alexia Foundation’s 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant to fund her project called “Missing in Action: Homeless Female Veterans,” the foundation announced this morning. Calvert was a finalist for the $25,000 grant last year, when it was initiated by the Alexia Foundation to support photojournalism projects about issues affecting women.

The Alexia Foundation says Calvert explained in her grant proposal that female veterans are the fastest growing segment of the US homeless population, and are four times more likely than civilian women to become homeless because of health issues, and psychological and economic stress. Those issues are often exacerbated by the strains of parenthood. But the Department of Veteran’s affairs is ill-equipped to address the needs of female veterans, according to critics.

“Mary Calvert’s project on homeless female veterans in Los Angeles qualifies as the poster story for our mission statement,” Alexia Foundation co-founder Aphrodite Tsairis said on the foundation’s blog. “The stark emotion evoked in her images promises to deliver the raw naked truth about a neglected segment in the military.”

Calvert’s work will focus on homeless female veterans in the Los Angeles area. She will explore the efforts of the Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations to provide services, as well as “put a human face on this neglected crisis” by allowing women to tell their stories in their own voices, according to the Alexia Foundation.

As a condition of the grant, Calvert is expected to submit a project portfolio of at least 60 images by March 1, 2015. The Alexia Foundation expects to assist her in creating a multimedia production of the finished work, according to communications director Eileen Mignoni.

Mignoni says the Alexia Foundation received 400 applications for the Women’s Initiative Grant this year. The foundation’s nine-member Photojournalism Advisory Council selected the winner. The advisory council members include Jim Dooley, Brian Storm, Ed Kashi, Ami Vitale, Pim Van Hemmen, Huang Wen, Whitney Johnson, Aidan Sullivan and Lacy Austin.

Related Articles:
Anatomy of a  Successful Grant Application: Tim Matsui on the Women’s Initiative Grant (for PDN subscribers)

Tim Matsui Wins Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant

August 26th, 2014

Upcoming Grant Deadlines for Emerging Photographers, Photojournalists and First Photo Books

Cover of "Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene" by 2013 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography winner Gerard H. Gaskin. Published by Duke University Press, 2013.

Cover of “Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene” by 2013 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography winner Gerard H. Gaskin. Published by Duke University Press, 2013.

Three major photography grants have rapidly approaching deadlines in early September: burn magazine’s Emerging Photographer Fund; the First Book Prize in Photography, offered by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the Honickman Foundation in Philadelphia; and the Carmignac Foundation’s Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award.

Burn magazine—curated by Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey—has extended the deadline for their annual award to 6:00 p.m. EDT September 2, 2014. The grant supports the continuation of a personal project, whether journalistic or artistic, and is funded by anonymous donors. This year’s jurors will include The New York Times’ Lens Blog’s James Estrin and the photojournalist Donna Ferrato.

The competition is open to emerging photographers of any age, and the entry fee is $25. The major prize is $10,000; several smaller, minor prizes have been awarded in recent years. Four grants were awarded in 2013—one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger,’ and three minors, to Iveta Vaivode for her essay “Somewhere on Disappearing Path,” Oksana Yushko for her essay “Balaklava: The Lost History” and Maciej Pisuk for his essay “Under The Skin. Photographs From Brzeska Street.” To enter, visit burnmagazine.org.

The First Book Prize in Photography is a biennial grant offered to North American photographers who have yet to publish a book-length photo project, and “use their cameras for creative exploration” to make work that is “visually compelling, that bears witness and that has integrity of purpose.” Past judges include Robert Adams, Maria Morris Hambourg, Robert Frank, Mary Ellen Mark, William Eggleston and Deborah Willis. Past winners include Gerald H. Gaskin, for his book Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene, and Jannette Williams for The Bathers.

The prize includes $3,000, publication of a photo book, inclusion in a website showcasing finalists and a solo exhibition at the Archive of Documentary Arts in Duke’s Rubenstein Library. Entrants must submit 40 photos with captions, a one-page artist statement, a one-page CV and $70 by 11:59 pm, September 15.

This year, Joshua Chuang—chief curator of the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona—will confer with a selection committee of accomplished photographers, editors and publishers to choose between 12 and 20 finalists, who will then be asked to submit ten sample prints by December 1, 2014. Sandra S. Philips, senior curator of photography at SFMOMA, will review the finalists, select the winner, and write the introduction to the winner’s published book. To enter, visit firstbookprizephoto.com.

The Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award is a competition begun in 2009 to support and promote investigative photography. The Carmignac Foundation hopes to bring light to areas and issues that have not yet captured the world’s attention, but are nonetheless crucial to geopolitics and global freedom of speech and human rights. This year’s theme is “Lawless Areas in France,” focusing on “political, legal or socio-economic no man’s land subject to deregulation—where the authority of the French Republic is challenged.”

Funding in-depth photographic reportage, this year’s prize includes €50,000, financing for a monograph, a touring exhibition through France, Italy, Germany and the U.K. and a guaranteed purchase of four prints by the foundation from the winning photographer. A preselection committee will shortlist between ten and 15 candidates, who will be sent to a jury that will convene in Paris on October 30. The deadline to apply is midnight, GMT, September 28, 2014; the name of the winning candidate will be kept confidential (for security reasons, according to Carmignac) until July 2015. To enter, apply online here.

July 23rd, 2014

Tim Matsui Wins $25K Fledgling Fund Grant for Sex Trafficking Project

From "Leaving the Life:" Lisa in her robe. ©Tim Matsui

From “Leaving the Life:” Lisa in her robe. ©Tim Matsui

Photographer Tim Matsui, who has focused on stories about sexual violence and human trafficking for the past decade, has won a $25,000 Fledgling Fund grant for his project called “Leaving the Life.” Matsui will use the grant to engage audiences and spur dialogue about sex trafficking of minors in the US. He plans to produce several videos, each about 15 minutes in length, tailored for different audiences.  For instance, one of the videos will examine prostitution among minors from the perspective of law enforcement, which traditionally treats minors in the sex trade as criminals rather than victims. Another short video will present the issue from the perspective of young sex workers.

“Fledgling is supporting the initial creation of this campaign which include several live screenings of the [short videos] and a basic web platform which, in the future, will be built out,” Matusi explains.

Fledgling Fund administrators did not respond to a request for comment.

Matsui won an Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant in 2012 to document new approaches by officials in Seattle to addressing the problem of the sex trafficking of minors. He will use footage he’s already shot for that project to produce the short videos for “Leaving the Life.” Separately, he has produced a longer documentary in conjunction with MediaStorm called “The Long Night.”

The Fledgling Fund, established in 2005, provides filmmakers with grants to “move audiences to action” with outreach and audience engagement initiatives. The fund has provided nearly $12 million to support 333 projects to date.

Related:
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Tim Matsui on the Women’s Initiative Grant (for PDN subscribers)
Frames Per Second: A Corporate Story, Told by a Journalist