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December 22nd, 2015

Nina Berman Wins 2016 Aftermath Grant For Project on War’s Toxic Legacy

Nina Berman has won the 2016 Aftermath Project Grant for “Acknowledgment of Danger,” a look at the “toxic legacy of war on the American landscape.” Berman, a documentary photographer, has published two books: Purple Hearts—Back from Iraq (2004), on wounded veterans; and Homeland (2008), a look at surveillance and paranoia in post 9/11 America. Sara Terry, photographer and founder of The Aftermath Project, announced the news on social media today.

The Aftermath Project, a nonprofit, supports the production of projects on “the lingering wounds of war” and communities recovering from conflict. Past winners of the Aftermath Project Grant include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Justyna Mielnikiewicz. In August 2015, Terry announced the 2016 grant would be the last the organization would offer “for the time being.” In the coming year, the organization will “concentrate on our tenth anniversary and strategize our way forward.”

In addition to naming the 2016 grant winner, the judges also chose several finalists:

Juan Arredondo for his project, “Everybody Needs a Good Neighbor,” about the challenges faced by ex-combatants transitioning back to civilian life in Colombia, as the nation prepares for a historic peace agreement between the government and FARC in March, 2016.

Bharat Choudhary for his project, “The Silence of Others,” which examines the aftermath of the war on terror and its disastrous psychological impact on young Muslims living in the West.

Paolo Marchetti for his project “FEVER: The Awakening of European Fascism,” which documents the growing racial intolerance – exacerbated by the economic crisis and by political ideologues – expressed by many young people reacting against the massive flow of immigrants to Europe.

Brian McCarty for his project, “War Toys,” a conceptual art/photography project. With the help of expressive therapists, McCarty works with the children to make narrative photographs that recreate their experiences using locally found toys.

The judges for the 2016 grants were Terry; Denise Wolff, an editor with Aperture; photographer (and former Aftermath Project board member) Jeff Jacobson; photographer Maggie Steber; and Elizabeth Rappaport, a photographer and Aftermath Project board member.

Related Articles
Project on Ukraine Wins $20,000 2015 Aftermath Grant

Post 9/11 War Business Projects Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects (interview with Sara Terry)

December 3rd, 2015

Fund Your Work: Photojournalist Yunghi Kim Offering Ten $1,000 Grants

Photojournalist Yunghi Kim is offering ten grants of $1,000 each “to emphasize the importance of copyright registration [and] to give back to the profession of photojournalism,” she recently announced on her website.

Kim explains that she is funding the one-time grants “from fees recovered from unauthorized use of my work.”  Only US-based freelance photojournalists who were members of the Photojouralists Cooperative group on Facebook as of November 25, 2015 are eligible for the grants. Interested photographers must email a 300-word essay to Kim by December 20, explaining why they want the grant.

“This money can be to start, further or finish a project, or to help alleviate a financial hardship,” she explains. “Make an honest, compelling case concisely and in 300 words.”

Kim will judge the applications and select the winners along with Jeffrey Smith, director of Contact Press Images, the agency that represents Kim. Winners will be announced December 25.

Additional details are available on Kim’s website.

Related:
Fund Your Work: Manuel Ortiz Foundation Seeking Project for $5,000 Documentary Grant
Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions
How (And Why) to Make Copyright Registration Part of Your Workflow (for PDN subscribers)

December 2nd, 2015

Fund Your Work: Manuel Ortiz Foundation Seeking Projects for $5,000 Documentary Grant

The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary Photography & Film is accepting proposals for their $5,000 grants for a documentary photo project and a short documentary film. The deadline to enter is March 31, 2016.

© Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation/photo by Pablo Ernesto Piovano

© Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation/photo by Pablo Ernesto Piovano

The Foundation awards one $5,000 grant to a photo project concerning pressing social issues “such as health, poverty, oppression, war, famine, religious/political persecution and similar topics.” Photographers can apply for support for either new or continuing projects by submitting a 15-image portfolio, written proposal, CV and other supporting documents. The 12 shortlisted portfolios will be displayed during the Rencontres d’Arles festival in France in 2016. The winner must complete the proposed project within a year of receiving the grant.

The 2015 recipient of the Grant was Pablo Ernesto Piovano of Argentina, for his project on the human cost of the widespread use of herbicides in agriculture in Argentina.

The Foundation is also offering a new, $5,000 grant to support what it calls “Short-short Documentary Film.” Filmmakers can submit samples of their field work and proposals for producing films “highlighting human unrest, forgotten communities, over-exploited people and environments impacted by war, poverty, famine, disease, exploitation and global distress.”

A full list of guidelines for both grants are available on the website of the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation.

Related Articles
Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions

How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects

Mary Virginia Swanson’s Tips on Funding Your Photo Project

October 24th, 2015

PPE 2015: Mary Virginia Swanson’s Tips on Funding Your Photo Project

In her seminar “How to Fund Your Long-Term Project” at PhotoPlus Expo, Mary Virginia Swanson shared a variety ideas for researching and securing support from government, corporate and philanthropic entities. Swanson, a consultant, author and the executive director of the LOOK3 festival, encouraged photographers to think about everything they need to finish a project, and to achieve their goals: These valuable assets can include not only cash, but also access to subjects, paper or printing, publicity for an exhibition. Whether support in these areas from a lab that donates printing, the chamber of commerce that publicizes an event or or a local bank that helps pay for an exhibition, Swanson recommended thinking about what value your project can offer to the supporter. “Would putting their logo on an exhibition or book be of value?,” she asked. Consider the visibility the funder might want: “Do your funders the courtesy of thanking them,” on the wall of the exhibition, on invitations, and on your website.

Swanson noted that many photographers are applying for the same grants, fellowships, and government-supported arts programs, so they need to broaden their search for funding. She divided funders into two camps: Those interested in supporting you, and those interested in supporting the subject of your project. The people interested in supporting you are limited to “your fan base and your family.” Support for your subject matter, she said, “comes from like-minded, passionate people.” These may include strangers, who are likely to ask, “Is there a tax deduction in this for me?”

Funders who want tax deductions are unlikely to write a check to individuals, however, so photographers may benefit from partnering with a fiscal agent. Fiscal agents provide artists a connection to a 501 c 3 nonprofit, and can funnel your donations to you; they typically handle administration in exchange for a percentage of your donations. Fractured Atlas, Blue Earth Alliance (which works with artists devoted to environmental issues) and NYFA (New York Foundation for the Arts) are three fiscal agents who work with photographers.

Swanson gave a quick primer on researching family foundations and corporate philanthropies. Many companies devote pages of their websites to topics such as “corporate responsibility” or “the community,” and provide information on the charities and causes they support. “They’ll be giving [to a cause] because it supports the community they function in or serves the families of their employees.” Target, for example, funds arts education.

The Foundation Center has a searchable database of grant-making organizations, which is available online and at hundreds of satellites the Foundation Center supports around the country in local libraries and community centers. The database provides information on each philanthropy’s mission, the causes it supports, and also access to its most recent 990 tax form, where nonprofits list exactly how much money they gave in the course of a year, and to whom. By paying for a subscription to the Foundation Center’s database, users can also search for grants and funders by subject matter or area of interest.

In considering whether to try crowd-funding, Swanson said, “You have to weigh if you want to take a month off from working to work on your crowd-funding.” She noted that Kickstarter has an extensive reach, can attract enormous traffic and donations to the campaigns its staff chooses to highlight, and provides users useful information about traffic and donations. She also noted, however, that if a crowdfunding campaign fails to reach its goal, it remains on the Kickstarter site forever “as a failed project.” Swanson recommended looking at the projects that failed before writing or recording your own pitch for a crowd-funding campaign. After looking at pitches that failed, Swanson said, “I promise you, you’ll make your video differently.”

Related Articles
Advice on Funding Your Photo Project

How to Win Grants for Your Photo Projects

Mary Virginia Swanson Named New Executive Director of LOOK3

September 4th, 2015

Getty Awards $10,000 Grants to 5 Photographers

From "Zanan," by Mojgan Ghanbari. ©Mojgan Ghnabari

From “Zanan,” by Mojgan Ghanbari, winner of a 2015 Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography. ©Mojgan Ghanbari

The winners of the 2015 Getty Grants for Editorial Photography are Souvid Datta, Salvatore Esposito, Javier Arcenillas, Mojgan Ghanbari and Matt Eich, according to an announcement yesterday from Getty Images. Each of the five photojournalists will receive a grant of $10,000, as well as editorial support from Getty, to pursue “projects of personal and journalistic significance,” the agency says.

Those projects include “Sonagachi: Vanishing Girls,” by Souvid Datta, about the red light district of Songachi, Kolkata; “What Is Missing,” Salvatore Esposito’s examination of the social and political dynamics underlying street crime in Naples; “Latidoamerica,” a project about atrocious gang violence in Central America by Javier Arcenillas; “Zanan,” Mojgan Ghanbari’s project about the lives of Iranian women; and “Carry Me Ohio,” Matt Eich’s look at everyday life in the economically distressed regions of southeast Ohio.

Getty says it received nearly 400 applications from 78 countries for this year’s grant competition. Jurors for the competition were photo editor Cheryl Newman, Sunday Times Magazine director of photography Jon Jones, Der Spiegel international director of photography Matthias Krug, Paris Match director of photography Romain Lacroix, and Visa pour l’Image director Jean-Francois Leroy.

In announcing the winners, Getty also announced that one of the Getty Images Editorial Grants will be renamed The David Laidler Memorial Award, in honor of the former Getty employee and veteran photo editor who founded the grants. Laidler died of cancer on August 11 at the age of 48.

Related:
Advice on Funding Your Photo Project

August 19th, 2015

5 Winners of 2015 Aaron Siskind Fellowships Named

© Juan Arredondo.

2015 Grant Winner Juan Arredondo’s “Born into Conflict” documents the lives of current and former child soldiers in Colombia. © Juan Arredondo.

The Aaron Siskind Foundation has announced the winners of its 2015 Individual Photographer’s Fellowship (IPF) grants on August 17. This year’s recipients are:

Juan Arredondo of West Orange, NJ
Amy Finkelstein of Takoma Park, MD
Robyn Hasty of Brooklyn, NY
Ed Kashi of Montclair, NJ
Natalie Krick of Longmont, CO

The first-round judges for this year’s fellowships were Hank Willis Thomas, artist; Lyle Rexer, critic; and photographer Tomas Roma. The jurors for the final round of judging were Renée Cox, photographer, activist, and curator; Britt Salvesen, Department Head and Curator of the Wallis Annenberg Department of Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and Aidan Sullivan, Vice President, Getty Images. The Foundation received over 1,100 applications for its 2015 IPF grants.

The Aaron Siskind Foundation awards cash grants of varying amounts, up to $10,000, to support projects by photographers of all levels who reside in the US, are 21 years of age or older, and make work “based on the idea of the lens-based still image,” according to the grant guidelines.

The Foundation was created in 1991 to administer the grants, in keeping with photographer Aaron Siskind’s request that upon his death his estate would be used to support and inspire contemporary photography. Past recipients of the IPF have included Wayne Lawrence, Gillian Laub, Chris Jordan, Peter van Agtmael, Matt Eich, Gregory Crewdson, Ashley Gilbertson, Deana Lawson, Ron Jude and Lori Wasselchuk.

Related articles
Aaron Siskind Foundation 2014 Grant Recipients

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Aaron Siskind Foundation Announces 6 Winners of 2013 Grants

August 14th, 2015

Álvaro Laíz Wins 2015 FotoVisura Personal Project Grant

Photo By Álvaro Laíz

Kostya, a 33-year-old Udege hunter, looks out at the taiga from his cabin. © Álvaro Laíz

Visura announced today that Álvaro Laíz has won the 2015 FotoVisura Grant for Outstanding Personal Project for “THE HUNT,” his project documenting the shamanistic Udege people of Russia’s Far East taiga, or boreal forest. He received a $2,000 cash prize, a paid commission from the Washington Post to publish his work on its In Sight blog, as well as a lifetime sponsored GUILD membership with Visura.

Laíz became acquainted with the Udege when he traveled to Southeast Russia for the first time in the fall of 2014. He worked with national parks, scientists, rangers and Udege hunters. He lived with them for a month, making portraits and documenting their hunt. One hunter he met (seen in the above photo) died just hours after Laíz photographed him. The Udege practice animism, a belief that non-human life forms such as plants, animals and inanimate objects possess spirits. “Animism and the relationship among nature and culture are not really new to me,” Láiz told the Post. “I have been working on those topics for the last six years.” In fact, it was a legend of a poacher killed by the dark spirit of a tiger he had killed is partly responsible for his initial interest in the culture.

Three finalists for the Visura grant were also named.  Linda Forsell’s “Children who have Children” was named “Top Finalist,” and both Annie Flannagan’s “We Grew Up With Gum in Our Hair” and Aaron Vincent Elkaim’s “Where the River Runs Through were named “Finalists.”

The entries for the FotoVisura grant were evaluated by a six-member jury: MaryAnne Golon of the Washington Post; Judy Walgren of the San Francisco Chronicle; Simon Barnett of CNN Photos; Grey Hutton of VICE; Elizabeth Griffin of Esquire; and photographer Sebastian Liste, a member of NOOR.

July 13th, 2015

Pulitzer Center Announces $1 Million Fund for Multimedia Journalism Projects

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting has announced the Catalyst Fund, a new initiative that will support “as many as 40” multimedia journalism projects in the next two years with $1 million in grants made to journalists working with major news outlets.

In addition to supporting the production of multimedia reportage, the Fund will also support journalists in their efforts to disseminate projects to students through presentations at schools and via the Pulitzer Center website.

The Fund is supported by donations from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Kendeda Fund, and from individual donors.

“The Pulitzer Center is a leader among a growing field of nonprofit news organizations bringing creative models of production and dissemination to a disrupted news industry,” said Kathy Im, Director of MacArthur Foundation’s Journalism and Media program, in a statement.

The Pulitzer Center says it has already committed Catalyst Fund support to projects that will be published by The New York Times, National Geographic, MSNBC and other outlets.

Journalists interested in applying for Catalyst Fund grants are encouraged to apply through the Pulitzer Center’s grants portal, here: http://www.pulitzercenter.org/grants

Related: Q&A: How to Get Funding From The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

May 7th, 2015

Getty Images and Instagram Launch $10K Social Media Photo Grant

Photographers who use Instagram to document and share stories of underrepresented communities are eligible for a new $10,000 grant announced today by Getty Images and Instagram.

According to an announcement from Instagram, the judges will pick three winners based on “the existing body of work represented on their Instagram account, focusing on the quality of their imagery, their photographic skills and on the project and stories told through their photos.”

“Photographers in all corners of the world use the Instagram platform to share unique and authentic stories that otherwise rarely come into focus,” Getty’s senior director of content partnerships Elodie Malliet Storm said in a statement.

“This grant captures the global enthusiasm from photographers to continue to push their craft to new levels,” added Instagram community director Amanda Kelso.

In addition to the grant money, the work of the winners will be shown at the Photoville photography festival in September in New York City. Winners will also receive mentorship from a Getty Images photographer.

The grant boasts a distinguished list of judges. They are: TIME magazine director of photography Kira Pollack; photographer Malin Fezehai; photographer Maggie Steber; photographer and National Geographic Fellow David Guttenfelder; and photographer and @EverdayIran co-founder Ramin Talaie.

Applications will be accepted through June 4, 2015 at 11:59 p.m. GMT. Getty and Instagram also released a hashtag to help spread work of the grant: #GettyImagesInstagramGrant.

For more information or to apply, visit: www.gettyimages.com/grants

Related: PDN’s 30: Malin Fezehai
PPE 2014: Leading The Revolution in Smartphone Photography
Why TIME Chose an Amateur Photographer’s Image for Its Cover
Q&A: Instagram Editorial Director Pamela Chen
Maidan Moment: Anastasia Taylor-Lind’s Book of Portraits From Kiev

April 10th, 2015

11 Photographers Win 2015 Guggenheim Fellowships

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has announced the recipients of their 2015 fellowship grants. Among the 175 scholars, scientists, mathematicians, and artists chosen from over 3,100 applications this year are 11 photographers. As Guggenheim Fellows, they receive grants of varying but undisclosed amounts to pursue a proposed project.

The 2015 Guggenheim Fellows in photography are:
Gary Briechle
Miles Coolidge
Susan Lipper
Susan Meiselas
Arno Rafael Minkkinen
Richard Renaldi
Stuart Rome
Richard Rothman
Moises Saman
William S. Sutton
Terri Weifenbach

Also, Maria Gough, professor of modern art at Harvard, received a fellowship to pursue a project in photography studies.

The John Simon Guggenheim Foundations awards its annual Fellowship to artists, scholars and scientists on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise.
Past recipients have included Robert Frank, Brian Ulrich, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Brenda Ann Kenneally, Jason Fulford, Alex Soth and Penelope Umbrico.

Related:
11 Photographers Win 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships

Joseph Sywenkyj Wins $30,000 2015 W. Eugene Smith Grant (Moises Saman, Fellowship Winner)