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March 12th, 2013

Photog Uses Crappy Client Photos to Get Hired

crap-and-snap
Photographer James Hodgins of Sudbury, Ontario has come up with a creative visual solution for a perennial marketing challenge: Convincing clients who think they can shoot their own photography that they will get better results if they hire a professional photographer.

“People are visual. When you start talking lights, they tune you out,” Hodgins says.  One day it dawned on him to invite a client to tag along on a shoot with her own camera. “I said, ‘You take the picture you would have taken, and then I’ll take mine the way I would.”

And that’s how his Crappy vs. Snappy showcase was born. He dedicates a page on his Web site to side-by-side comparisons of his pictures and clients’ pictures, mostly of mining and industrial subjects. On a regular basis, Hodgins features Crappy vs. Snappy updates on his blog.

Hodgins says it is one of his most effective sales tools. “It’s all about educating the client. They get it.”

He has adapted the technique for all types of clients. When shooting business portraits, for instance, he’ll stand his subjects against a wall, and photograph them with a camera-mounted flash before photographing them in a studio setting with professional lighting. It makes a lasting impression on the subject, and Hodgins uses the before-and-after pictures to sell other clients on the difference.

“If every photographer did that, a lot more clients would understand the difference between picture by a professional and the average Joe,” Hodgins says.

July 6th, 2012

Video Pick: Making a Leica M9-P ‘Edition Hermès’ Camera

This summer, as part of its ongoing collaboration with the French fashion house Hermès, Leica announced a special “Hermès Edition” of the M9-P camera. Above is a video that shows the care and attention to detail that goes into making one of the limited-edition cameras.

The calfskin leather that’s wrapped around the camera’s body was supplied by Hermès and various details of the camera, including the top and base plates, the shutter speed dial, the multifunction wheel and the shutter release, were redesigned by Walter de’Silva. The camera comes in two sets: the first includes a Leica Summilux-M 50 mm f/1.4 ASPH. lens; the second includes Leica Summicron-M 28 mm f/2 ASPH., Noctilux-M 50 mm f/0.95 ASPH. and APO-Summicron-M 90 mm f/2 ASPH. lenses as well as an Hermès camera bag and a book of photos by Jean-Louis Dumas.

Dumas, the chairman and artistic director of Hermès from 1978 to 2006, was a well-known photography buff who was rarely without his Leica camera. He invested in the camera maker and decided that the Madison Avenue Hermès store in New York City should have a photo gallery on its top floor. To learn more about the retailer’s unique exhibition space, read our interview with curator Cory Jacobs.

June 14th, 2012

Photog Celebrates 30th B-day by Raising $30K for Charity

An image of a young boy at GLIDE San Fransisco by Lisa Wiseman.

Lisa Wiseman created a series of portraits of GLIDE clients, staffmembers, founders and executives as part of her The 30Love project.

San Francisco-based photographer Lisa Wiseman has created an online photography project that she’s using to help raise $30,000 in 30 days for GLIDE, a San Francisco social services organization that provides food, healthcare and training to needy people.

To raise the funds Wiseman, who has volunteered with GLIDE for several years, and a group of 12 cohorts created “The 30Love,” a Web site/art project where they are collecting donors’ photographs and statements about “what love means to them.”

Says Wiseman of the site: “We honed the concept over time and built a unique interactive photography constellation as the vehicle by which users engage with The 30Love participants. When the constellation is zoomed out, the constellations’ dots ‘run away’ from your mouse cursor. As you zoom in, the dots have less resistance and become images, each of which represents an individual 30Love participant. Once zoomed in far enough, you can click on any photo and you’ll be able to view that user’s photo, name, location and quote about what love means to them. In this way, The 30Love is a global time-capsule of what love means.”

In creating the project, Wiseman was inspired by a close friend who frequently uses holidays and other occasions “to do large-scale, fun, charitable projects,” and by writer Colleen Wainwright, who last year raised $50,000 for a charity in 50 days to mark her 50th birthday.

“Beyond fundraising, this project allows me to explore my interlinking passions for photography and technology,” Wiseman says. “Knowing that people all over the world will spend a moment thinking about what love means to them is my core personal motivation. I hope the project engages on a global level so that viewers can visit the website to explore the various dimensions of what love can mean around the world.”

For more information, and to contribute to the project, visit The 30Love.

June 8th, 2012

Photoville Brooklyn Announces Artist Talks, Workshops, Events

When the inaugural Photoville event kicks off on June 22 in Brooklyn, New York’s Brooklyn Bridge Park, not only will it boast a village of exhibitions housed in 30 freight containers, it will also include plenty of educational programming and events for visitors.

The slate of artist talks, lectures, workshops and other events run June 23-24. On the 23rd, BagNewsNotes editor Michael Shaw will speak about the state of news photography, and a panel discussion moderated by Pete Brook of Prison Photography blog fame will discuss “documentary, institutional, vernacular and legal photography and the political uses of images by media.”

That night MediaStorm will give a presentation on “digital storytelling and the cinematic narrative.”

Workshops that run on both days will cover topics like analogue photography, printing, light painting and zine making.

Programming on the June 24th will include a talk about contemporary documentary photography by Ed Kashi, Lori Grinker and Benjamin Lowy, moderated by Glenn Ruga, and a talk about how photography is being used to promote human rights.

That night there is a “show and tell” opportunity for anyone who wants to bring work and talk about it for three minutes, and throughout the day the Center for Alternative Photography will run a “Tintype Photo Booth” where visitors can have their portrait made and learn about this alternative photo process.

There is a slate of exhibitions by photographers from all over the world. For example, Open Society Institute will show Wyatt Gallery’s work from Haiti; Nooderlicht in the Netherlands will present 11 photographers documenting life in prison; The Magnum Foundation will exhibit recent work by Bruce Gilden and Sim Chi Yin. Feature Shoot is showing work by young photographers, and PDN is showing the winners of The Curator contest.

Add to all this the beer garden and food, and the dog run where you can get photos taken of your pooch at play.

For more on the Photoville schedule visit their Web site: http://photovillenyc.org/about.html