You are currently browsing the archives for the Film category.

December 18th, 2012

Ilford Fortifies B&W Film Business With Investment In Cassette Manufacturing

Harman technology, LTD, the company that owns Ilford Photo, has invested more than £350K (568,645 US Dollars) in creating its own 35mm film cassette manufacturing facility, the company announced today.

Maintaining a reliable supply of cassettes from external suppliers has been “problematic,” the company said in its announcement.

“This is just another example of our ongoing commitment to traditional monochrome photography,” Harman Managing Director Peter Elton said in a statement. “We are now able to manufacture our own cassettes and this gives us, and our customers, improved security for the future of film production.”

October 26th, 2012

PhotoPlus Expo 2012: Kodak Professional Film App Connects Photographers to Pro Film Resources

Here’s an interesting new app for your iPhone launched at PhotoPlus Expo by none other than Kodak. Called the Kodak Professional Film app and available now for free from the iTunes store, the app helps photographers locate where they can buy their favorite (remaining) Kodak films and where they can get them developed.

The app also offers tips on how best to shoot certain types of Kodak films. Some of the film stocks supported by the Kodak app include BW400CN, Ektar 100, Portra 160, T-Max 400, Tri-X 400 and others.

Sadly for film (and film grain) lovers, one of the films not included in the app is Kodak T-Max P3200, which was discontinued by the company earlier this month.

News of the new app also comes on the heels of a Kodak announcement in August that the company plans to sell off its film and photo paper business in an effort to pull itself out of bankruptcy.

Despite the tough times for Kodak’s film business, the company attempted to put a positive spin on the app and on Kodak pro film at the PhotoPlus show.

“We wanted to give photographers of all levels a resource, literally right at their fingertips, that helps them find film and recommendations about how to maximize each film’s performance,” Dennis Olbrich, Eastman Kodak’s general manager of Film, Paper & Output Systems said in a statement.

“In addition, this app also provides information where customers can find film development services, so that no matter where photographers are, they can find a lab that uses Kodak Chemicals and Paper to bring their photography to life.”

(more…)

September 14th, 2012

PDN Video Pick: Chasing The Light (With the New Nikon D600)

Wildlife photographer Florian Schulz, who we profiled in the August 2012 issue of PDN, was asked by Nikon to put the recently released D600 through its paces. Schulz was the first photographer to test the camera in the field. He and his brother, filmmaker Salomon Schulz, produced this short film, titled “Chasing the Light.”

NIKON – CHASING THE LIGHT from Florian Schulz on Vimeo.

Related: Photokina 2012: Nikon Debuts Smaller, 24.3MP Full-Frame D600 DSLR for Photo Enthusiasts

August 23rd, 2012

Kodak to Sell Off Film and Photo Paper Business (Update)

Eastman Kodak plans to sell off  its film and photographic paper businesses in an effort to emerge from bankruptcy, the Wall Street Journal reports. In an announcement on Thursday, Kodak chief executive officer Antonio Perez said the company is seeking buyers for its film and photo paper business and its digital image processing kiosks and scanners. The company plans to focus on inkjet printing, Perez said Thursday.  Among the businesses Kodak will keep, according to a statement on Kodak’s web site, are “Consumer inkjet, Entertaining Imaging, Commercial Film and Specialty Chemical businesses.” Kodak’s “commercial film” business refers to aerial photography, surveillance and other industrial and government uses.

Perez said the company wants to complete the sale by the first half of 2013, when the company hopes to emerge from bankruptcy. Kodak, once the leading manufacturer of film, sought bankruptcy protection in January 2012.

Perez declined to say how much Kodak hoped to net from the sales of its film, paper and other businesses. Also unclear: Who will buy these businesses.

When Kodak filed for bankruptcy, the company said it planned to raise money by selling off roughly 1,000 digital imaging patents. However Businessweek reports that those negotiations have dragged on.  The sale of its core business is a new effort to pay off debts and pull Kodak out of bankruptcy.

Professional photographer may find it bittersweet that Kodak’s U.S. professional film revenues rose 20 percent in 2011. However, as demand for consumer and motion picture film continued to decline worldwide, the company faced challenges taking advantage of economies of scale. Earlier this year, Scott DiSabato, who was Kodak’s U.S. marketing manager for professional film, told PDN that Kodak’s factories and distribution facilities “were built decades ago for a much bigger traditional photographic market.” DiSabato added at the time that though positive signs in the U.S. pro film market were promising,  “It’s going to be hard to ever justify the investment necessary to right-size this when [the overall film market] is declining.” DiSabato has since left Kodak.

For more, see our full news article on PDNOnline.

Related stories

PDNOnline: Kodak to Sell Film and Photo Paper Business

Kodak Files for Bankruptcy

The Future of Film 

 

June 8th, 2012

Everynone’s “Symmetry” Takes Top Prize at Vimeo Video Awards

Wil Hoffman (l.) and Julius Metoyer of Everynone accept the Grand Prize at last night's Vimeo Awards.

“Symmetry,” a visual tour de force of split screen juxtaposition, took the Grand Prize at last night’s Vimeo Video Awards in New York City. The short video was created by the directing collective Everynone, which includes Daniel Mercadante, Will Hoffman, and Julius Metoyer

In accepting the award, one of Symmetry’s creators described the on-the-fly, do-it-yourself aesthetic that was essential to making the prize-winning video.

“We often approached people on the street and asked that they do things that they might think are crazy (for the video),” Hoffman said. “I only hope that they see the work so they know how much they were a part of it.”

Symmetry, shown at the bottom of this story, also won the Lyrical Category in the Vimeo Awards. For winning the Grand Prize, the Everynone collective will receive $25,000 in addition to $5,000 for the Lyrical award.

“I hope Everynone is ready to be busy, because winning this award is going to change their lives,” said Eliot Rausch, who won the Vimeo Awards Grand Prize in 2010 for his movie, Last Minutes with Oden.

Rausch, who presented the Grand Prize to Everynone, said that he’s generated major video work from the attention he received after winning the 2012 Grand Prize award and is currently directing his first feature film.

Here’s a full breakdown of 2012 Vimeo Awards category winners with links to the videos:

1.    Action Sports: Dark Side of the Lens
2.    Advertising: K-Swiss Kenny Powers – MFCEO
3.    Animation: Umbra
4.    Captured: Sweatshoppe Video Painting Europe
5.    Documentary: Amar (All Great Achievements Require Time)
6.    Experimental: Prie Dieu
7.    Fashion: Skirt
8.    Lyrical: Symmetry
9.    Motion Graphics: A History of the Title Sequence
10.    Music Video: Manchester Orchestra: Simple Math
11.    Narrative: BLINKY™
12.    Series: Often Awesome The Series
13.    Remix: Rear Window Timelapse

Reggie Watts (l.) and Beardyman entertained the crowd at the Vimeo Awards with a live musical mashup.

Vimeo Awards judges included actor and director James Franco; Parks and Recreation star Aziz Ansari; 2012 Oscar Nominee Lucy Walker; Radiohead’s Colin Greenwood; Scott Pilgrim vs. the World director Edgar Wright; snowboarding star Travis Rice; Thierry Mugler and UNIQLO creative director Nicola Formichetti; Shelley Page of DreamWorks Animation; Barbara London of The Museum of Modern Art; advertising legend David Droga; and others.

Reggie Watts and Beardyman were the featured live performers at the awards, mashing up comedy, music, and spirited silliness.

May 1st, 2012

FujiFilm to Increase Film Prices 20 Percent in US Market

After announcing last week that they would increase prices worldwide for their film and single-use camera products, FujiFilm’s North America division has clarified what those increases will mean for the markets in the United States and Canada.

In an announcement today, the company said that prices on all film would rise “approximately 20 percent.” The increase will take effect in August 2012. The company had originally announced that the increases would be effective beginning in May of this year.

“The price increases are a result of the continuing decline in demand for film products, the high costs of production, and the increased expenses associated with raw materials, including silver and petro-chemicals, and energy,” the company explained in its announcement. “Fujifilm is unable to absorb these costs entirely and must implement price increases at this time.”

Prices for FujiFilm’s one-time-use cameras, often called disposable cameras, will increase 15 percent, the company said.

Related: FujiFilm Announces Price Increase

April 25th, 2012

FujiFilm Announces Film Price Increase

Earlier this week FujiFilm announced that a price increase will take effect starting in May for its color negative films, color reversal films, black and white films and QuickSnap single use cameras.

Though the announcement (full text below) was short on specific details, it did say that the increases would be “substantial” and would be in the “double digits” for some films depending on where they are sold.

FujiFilm noted that, “The demand for film products is continuously decreasing, yen’s appreciation and the cost of production, such as raw materials, oil and energy, continues to rise or stay at high level.”

A representative for FujiFilm told PDN the company would issue specific information about increases in the US market in the next few days, so stay tuned.

For more on the future of the film photography business, be sure to check out our report coming in the June issue of PDN.

Press Release, April 23, 2012

FUJIFILM Corporation announces price increase of Photographic Films

FUJIFILM Corporation has announced that it will implement a worldwide price increase for its photographic films. The price increases are substantial and it would be double digit, but will vary depending on products, markets and regions.

1. Products: Photographic Films: Color Negative Films, Color Reversal Films, Black and White Films, and Quick Snap.

2. Date of Price Increases: Effective from May 2012

The demand for film products is continuously decreasing, yen’s appreciation and the cost of production, such as raw materials, oil and energy, continues to rise or stay at high level. Under such circumstances, despite our effort to maintain the production cost, Fujifilm is unable to absorb these costs during the production process and is forced to pass on price increases.
To sustain its photo imaging business, Fujifilm has decided to increase the price of photographic films.

Fujifilm remains committed to photographic products and asserts that even with the new price. Its photographic products remain exceptionally good value compared with other system products.
The new pricing structure will be applied to each market based on its individual conditions.

Related: Kodak Files For Bankruptcy Protection

February 23rd, 2012

PDN Video Pick: New Documentary Shows Gregory Crewdson at Work

Photographer Gregory Crewdson, who is famous for his cinematic depictions small-town American life, is the subject of a new documentary that will premiere  March 10 at the SXSW music and film festival in Austin, Texas. Directed by Ben Shapiro, the film is called “Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters.” It takes viewers behind the scenes of the elaborate productions of some of his best known images, and if this trailer is any indication, the film shows what a regular guy he is–knocking over lamps, waking up sick with worry that things might go wrong–in his search for the perfect moment.

January 30th, 2012

Greenfield Wins Sundance Director Prize

Lauren Greenfield won the prize for best director of a US documentary at the Sundance Film Festival for her film, “The Queen of Versailles.” The prize was announced January 28 at the end of the festival for independent films.

Greenfield, a photographer and director whose previous documentaries include “Thin,” an HBO film on anorexia, was honored for her direction of a non-fiction film about a real estate mogul who tried to build the biggest house in America, only to be hit hard by the 2008 financial crisis. Earlier in the week, Magnolia Pictures bought the rights to distribute “The Queen of Versailles” in North America, and plans to release it this summer.

Reviewing the list of other award winners at the Festival, two more photographers’ names caught our attention.

“Chasing Ice,” directed by Jeff Orlowski, which documents how nature photographer James Balog has used time-lapse photography to show the shrinking of arctic glaciers over the years, won the award for Excellence in Cinematography in a US Documentary.

In the World Cinema category, “Valley of Saints,” written and directed by Musa Syeed, won the Audience Award for dramatic film. The director of photography on the film was Yoni Brook, a photographer and filmmaker known to us as a former PDN‘s 30.

The full list of award-winners is available at the Sundance.org Web site.

Related articles
Photographers’ Documentaries Debut at Sundance

Lauren Greenfield Sued for Defamation by Documentary Subject

January 19th, 2012

Photographers’ Documentaries Debut at Sundance Film Festival

Image from photographer Lauren Greenfield's "The Queen of Versailles"

© Lauren Greenfield, from "The Queen of Versailles"

The Sundance Film Festival, the 11-day festival of independent films, kicks off today in Park City, Utah, with a roster that includes documentaries by two photographers-turned-filmmakers.

“The Queen of Versailles,” a documentary by Lauren Greenfield, which will debut on the opening night of the Festival, has already been touted as a must-see at the Festival. In the film, Greenfield, whose 2006 documentary “Thin” also premiered at Sundance, documented a time-share developer and his wife as they attempt to build the biggest house in America, and then struggle in the economic downturn. The subject of the film, David A. Siegel, has already brought legal action—not about the movie, but about the wording of the press release for the film, which claimed his timeshare business had “collapsed.”

Also debuting at Sundance, though not included in the competition for festival prizes, is “About Face: The Supermodels, Then and Now,” by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders. Greenfield-Sanders expanded a piece he shot for Vanity Fair, shooting video interviews with former supermodels Jerry Hall, Carmen Dell’Orefice, Christy Turlington, Paulina Porizkova, Beverly Johnson and others, who discuss the issue of age in the beauty industry.

The trailer shows that all the former models still look pretty damned good. Yet Rossellini, for one, laughs that she’s no longer invited to A list parties; her daughter is.

Related story
Lauren Greenfield Sued for Defamation by Documentary Subject