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April 2nd, 2014

PDN Video: Lens Blog’s James Estrin’s Career Tips for Photojournalists

Jim Estrin: 6 Tips for Emerging Photojournalists from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

James Estrin, founder and co-editor of Lens, the popular New York Times photography blog, talks about how to launch a successful career as a photojournalist. His tips and insight cover how to choose meaningful projects, the importance of photojournalistic process, and practical advice about portfolios, mentors, and relationship-building with editors and peers.

Related:
PDN Video: Is Your Photo Project a Contender for Lens Blog?
PDN Video: How to Get the Most Out of a Portfolio Review
PDN’s 30 Photographers Provide Career Tips to Aspiring Photographers
PDN’s 30 2014: New and Emerging Photographers to Watch

March 7th, 2014

Eddie Adams Workshop, Smith Grant, Other Grants Accepting Applications

Earlier this week The Eddie Adams Workshop began accepting applications for its tuition-free, four-day photojournalism workshop in upstate New York. The Eddie Adams Workshop brings together top photography professionals and 100 students each year, and its alumni include many of the top photojournalists working today. Applications for the 2014 Workshop will be accepted through May 31. Students are selected based on the merit of their portfolios.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund is accepting applications through May 31 for the 2014 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography, which carries an award of $30,000. In addition, the jury will also give out an additional $5,000 in fellowships. There is a $50 fee to apply.

The nonprofit arts advocacy organization Crusade for Art is accepting proposals for its first-ever Engagement Grant, a $10,000 award given to a photographer or group of photographers who submit “the most innovative plan for increasing their audience and collector base.” There is a $20 fee to apply.

The Photographic Museum of Humanity, a digital photography museum, is awarding a grant of $4,000 for photographers. Applications are due March 12, and judges include Alec Soth and Diana Markosian. There is no fee to apply.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Minnesota’s Artist Initiative Grants (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Jon Lowenstein’s Guggenheim Fellowship (PDN subscription required)

November 18th, 2013

Pro Tips for Photographers with Jake Stangel

Colleagues know San Francisco-based photographer Jake Stangel as a person who is open with information, advice and encouragement for his peers and aspiring shooters.

Occasionally over the past few years Stangel has answered questions and offered “Pro Tips” on his Tumblr to younger photographers who are wondering how to go about building a career in today’s market.

Stangel gave us permission to reprint a couple of our favorite of these pieces on PDNPulse, and has also agreed to field questions from PDN readers for some new installments of his “Pro Tips” columns.

To submit a question for Jake please send an email to editor@pdnonline.com with the subject line “Pro Tips.”

On When to Work With a Rep and When to Just Work Harder

Question: So I’ve worked with some editors and worked for some companies doing small time shoots and small editorial things. My relationship with editors/publications is kind of going much too slow and I don’t feel confident in sending them promo or emailing them and expecting results. Would it be appropriate to find an agent? I feel confident in my work and abilities but I’m wondering if ever there’s a time to search for representation, would it be now?

What exactly should I be looking for with representation? And what should I be prepared to send them?

Answer: By and large, the appropriate time to search for representation is when you literally can no longer manage shooting and client requests and calendars and making estimates and negotiating various licenses and shoot deliverables all at once.

The other time an agent is helpful is if you’re extraordinarily talented but a recluse, and want someone to be your “face” and leave it up to you to just make photographs. But the key thing here is that you need to be extraordinarily talented. Extraordinarily. Talented. (more…)

October 10th, 2013

Part Art and Book Fair, Part Photo Fest, Unseen Delivers Energy, Mixed Reviews From Sellers in Second Year

© Amber Terranova

© Thijs Boontjes

In its second year, Unseen Art Fair drew an international audience to Amsterdam to view previously un-exhibited work from established artists and emerging talents. Set against the industrial backdrop of a repurposed nineteenth century coal gas power plant, the “art fair with a festival flair,” as organizers dubbed it, featured plenty of energy and excitement, but drew mixed reactions from gallerists, with some noting that combining an art fair, book fair and photo festival, with artist talks and other programming, distracted from the business of print sales. (more…)

September 6th, 2013

Farzana Hossen Wins 2013 Ian Parry Scholarship for Project on Violence Against Women

© Farzana Hossen

© Farzana Hossen

Farzana Hossen, a student at Pathshala South Media Institute in Dhaka, Bangladesh, has won the 2013 Ian Parry Scholarship for her project “Lingering Scars,” about the rise in violence against women in Bangladesh. Hossen receives 3,500 pounds (approximately $5,450 US), a commission from Save the Children, publication of her Project in The Sunday Times Magazine, representation from Reportage by Getty Images as part of their Emerging Talent group, and equipment from Canon. She will also becomes a finalist for the shortlist of photographers selected for Joop Swart Masterclass, conducted by World Press Photo.

Hossen has documented women injured by acid thrown at them. One of the judges for this year’s Ian Parry Scholarship, photojournalist Don McCullin, noted the strength of Hossen’s images and text. “I get a clear sense that Farzana has an invested interest in conveying the horror of these attacks.”

The award was announced at the Visa Pour l’Image festival in Perpignan, France.  One “highly commended “ photographer and two “commended” photographers were also announced. They will receive 500 pounds (approximately $780 US).

The Ian Parry Scholarship, named for the Sunday Times of London photographer who was killed at the age of 24 while covering the Romanian Revolution, supports projects by full-time photography students and photographers under 24.

The highly commended photographer, Magda Rakita, has photographed in Liberia, focusing on issues affecting women. Rakita, who was born in Poland, is studying for her masters at London College of Communications, and plans to continue her work in Liberia as the country observes the tenth anniversary of the end of its civil conflict.

One of the two commended photographers, Kazi Riasat Alve of Bangladesh, is studying in a documentary mentoring program under Saiful Huq Omi at Counter Foto. Alve’s project, “Life at Suhrawardi Uddan,” looks at a Dhaka park that has sheltered homeless people.

The other commended photographer, Mehran Hamrahi, has documenting young people in Iran, where 70 percent of the population is under the age of 35, in a project titled “Iranian People, Ordinary or Criminals?” Born in Iran in 1989, Hamrahi began studying photography in 2009. He has worked for the Iranian Students News Agency and had two solo exhibitions.

Information on the Ian Parry Scholarship, and galleries of the winners’ work, can be found at www.ianparry.org

Related article:

Adrian Fussell Wins 2012 Ian Parry Scholarship

August 22nd, 2013

Photography Trade Organizations Take Aim at Instagram Terms

Several professional photography trade organizations have banded together to study Instagram’s Terms of Service, and today the American Society of Media Photographers issued the following press release:

Photographic Community, Led by The American Society of Media Photographers, Deems Instagram Terms Too Far-Reaching

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 22, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), joined by National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), The Digital Media Licensing Association (PACA), American Photographic Artists (APA), This Week in Photography (TWiP), Professional Photographers of America (PPA), Coordination of European Picture Agencies Stock, Press and Heritage (CEPIC), Graphic Artists Guild (GAG) and American Society of Picture Professionals (ASPP), has mounted a campaign to address the far-reaching Terms of Use of the image sharing service Instagram. Since 2010, more than 16 billion images and movies have been uploaded to Instagram. The organizations believe that few of the users who share images on the site understand the rights they are giving away. ASMP has issued “The Instagram Papers,” information in the form of essays and analysis about the Terms of Use in which the key issue is that users should have the ‘right to terminate’ their agreement with Instagram, allowing them to remove permissions for the use of their identities and content at any time.

Specifically, the Terms of Use give Instagram perpetual use of photos and video as well as the nearly unlimited right to license the images to any and all third parties. And, after granting this broad license to Instagram, users also relinquish the right to terminate the agreement. Once uploaded, they cannot remove their work and their identity from Instagram. Additionally, in the event of litigation regarding a photo or video, it is the account holder who is responsible for attorney and other fees, not Instagram.

Moreover, while Instagram’s agreement includes the right to sublicense images, it specifically excludes the need to ever pay creators, regardless of the way the company may use or sell their work. The photographic community believes strongly that fair compensation for the creators of work is a vital component of a fair agreement.

According to ASMP Executive Director Eugene Mopsik, “While clearly benefiting Instagram, the rights of imaging professionals and general users stand to be infringed upon in an unprecedented way. We are concerned that not only have Instagram’s Terms of Use gone beyond acceptable standards, but also that other social media providers may use these onerous terms as a template for their own agreements.”

Peter Krogh, ASMP’s Digital Standards & Practices Chair, said, “As online services become larger repositories of intellectual property, power has shifted away from the user and toward the company provider. Unless changes are made by Instagram, we believe the terms will have a profound and negative impact on imaging professionals, publishers and general users.”

In the coming weeks and months ASMP, along with the other listed organizations, will continue to reach out to gain support in addressing these egregious terms before they become the industry standard.

Related: Bowing to Pressure from Users, Instagram Retracts New Terms of Use
Now That We Know Instagram Isn’t a Charity, What Would You Be Willing to Pay?

August 8th, 2013

Fed Up with Self-Serving Noise from Photo Bloggers, Zack Arias Started a Blog, Then Published a Book in His Spare Time

Photographer Zack Arias is the accidental “Dear Abby” of the photo industry. He started a Tumblr blog last year called Photography Q&A, inviting readers to “ask me anything about photography.” He has since fielded more than 1,000 “Hi Zack” e-mails with questions about gear, technique, art and creativity, and business.

The blog is popular not only for the information Arias provides, but because of his honesty, good humor, and horse sense. He often recounts his own mistakes to instruct and encourage his readers, and isn’t afraid to cajole them, or challenge the industry’s conventional wisdom and egos.

Arias, who is also a popular workshop instructor, recently compiled some of the blog’s best installments into a book called Photography Q&A: Real Questions. Real Answers, published by New Riders. An excerpt of the book appears in the August issue of PDN, and is now available on our web site. We asked Arias how his blog got started, and he replied with his usual candor.

“It was because I got pissed off at another photographer [who] came out with a web site that was this ‘Top Ten Steps’–like a system to help get you started becoming a photographer. There was just a lot of bad information in it. A lot of people were in an uproar. I was staying out of the fray, but people kept asking me, ‘Zack, what do you think of it?’

“Finally I said, ‘The hell with it. Here’s what I think of it: I think it’s a bunch of trash, and nobody should listen to it for these reasons.’ Then I was in the fray, and then I was pissed off, and it was just one of those things: OK, you’re going to do a top ten? I’m going to do a top 100–no, I’m going to do a top 1000. There’s a lot of noise in our industry right now. There’s a lot of top ten lists, and ‘get this going quick’ [schemes] and people just walking all over the craft and people not preaching that you have to be patient, you have to work hard, and this is going to take a long time and it’s not easy. If you think it’s just about taking pictures, you’re missing the other 90 percent of what it means to be a professional photographer. And I wanted to create something that had more signal, and wasn’t noise, and wasn’t just an affiliate link aggregator, like hey, we’re going to bring a lot of people to our blog, and hope they click on our links so we can monetize it.

“So it [the blog] started because I wanted to create something that had a more honest look [at the profession] than have a shiny, happy infomercial that was getting a lot of traction.”

Meanwhile, Arias is taking a break from teaching workshops, but that’s another story.

Related:
School of Hard Knocks: Zack Arias, Lost and Found (subscription required)
PDN Reader Survey: The Best Workshop Instructors

June 5th, 2013

Events, Awards and Other Photo Happenings

Events

Tonight at the New York Public Library, photography educator and historian Deborah Willis will discuss Leonard Freed‘s photographs of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Joining Willis on the panel will be photographers Eli Reed and Jamel Shabazz, scholar Paul M. Farber, writer Michael Eric Dyson, and Freed’s widow, Brigitte Freed. The event begins at 6pm.

The Chris Hondros Fund, which supports photojournalism with fellowships and other programs, is holding a benefit online print auction through June 7. Work by Slim Aarons, James Balog, Al Bello, Andrea Bruce, Robert Capa, Ernst Haas, Michael Kamber, Ed Ou, Joao Silva and many other photographers is for sale.

Free seminars at Review Santa Fe start this Friday with “The Business of Photography.” On Saturday a panel of photographers will discuss “New Methods For Engaging Audiences,” and on Sunday Guggenheim Fellow John Gossage will lecture on “Contemporary Photographic Practice.” For more public events check out the Review Santa Fe event schedule.

Italian photographic education organization Cesura is running a travel workshop in Cairo in November. Led by Gabriele Micalizzi, who covered the Egyptian revolution, workshop participants will also have the option of a two-day supplemental workshop with photographer Moises Saman.

Awards

Kevin Miller received The New Orleans Photo Alliance‘s 2013 Michael P. Smith Fund for Documentary Photography Grant for his project on the Panama Canal expansion. (more…)

May 17th, 2013

Video Pick: PDN’s 30 Panel at Palm Springs Photo Fest

If you didn’t get a chance to attend the PDN‘s 30 panel at this year’s Palm Springs Photo Festival, you can now watch it below! The symposium, called “PDN Presents: Strategies for the Emerging Photographer,” took place on Monday April 29 and was moderated by PDN Editor Holly Stuart Hughes. The panelists were: 2013 PDN‘s 30 photographers Ian Allen, John Francis Peters and Jessica Sample; Photo Editor Emily Shornick, who works at NYMag.com’s The Cut; and Sony Artisan of Imagery Andy Katz. The photographers discuss how they transitioned to shooting professionally, while Shornick gives insight on what photo editors are looking for when hiring photographers.

You can see the complete list of 2013 PDN‘s 30 photographers at pdnevents.com/pdn30.

PDN’s Strategies For The Emerging Photographer at the Palm Springs Photo Festival from PALM SPRINGS PHOTO FESTIVAL on Vimeo.

March 12th, 2013

Photogs Dish Anonymously About Clients’ Rates Via New Tumblr Site

A new site on Tumblr set up by an anonymous editorial photographer seeks to provide a platform where photographers can share information about what clients in all fields, from editorial to advertising to non-profits, pay photographers.

Still in its infancy, the site, Who Pays Photographers, is based on a similar Tumblr, Who Pays Writers, which, you guessed it, lists fees paid to writers. According to the anonymous founder of Who Pays Photographers, the response has been a bit overwhelming, indicating a serious interest among photographers to talk about, and read about, the fees clients pay for photographic work.

Thus far the site has information about The New York Times, Getty Images, AP, AFP, The Wall Street Journal, ESPN and several other clients in the US and abroad.

We exchanged emails with the creator of Who Pays Photographers to find out a bit more about her/his goals for the site.

PDN: How long have you worked as a photographer and in what field?

Who Pays Photographers: I’m an editorial photographer with 6 years experience, about half of that time as a staffer at a magazine, and more recently, as a freelancer.

PDN: What inspired you to start the site? Was it just a natural reaction to seeing Manjula Martin’s Who Pays Writers, or was there more to it?

WPP: The site was a simple reaction to Who Pays Writers, a site that was linked to a number of times during the recent Nate Thayer kerfuffle with the Atlantic. It seemed obvious that the photo industry could really benefit from having such a resource and I found it surprising that nothing of the sort existed. (more…)