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June 20th, 2016

Woods Wheatcroft on the Great Outdoors

The work of photographer Woods Wheatcroft is imbued with light, energy and play. In fact, those are the names of three portfolios on his website that present his work. Wheatcroft shoots travel, lifestyle and stock photography that is true to his West Coast upbringing: laid back, cheery and sunlit.

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A long exposure of a surfer in Baja California, Mexico. Photo © Woods Wheatcroft

His work has attracted outdoor clients such as Keen, Outside and Patagonia, and his job often takes him to far-flung locations. Last year, a shot of BASE jumpers in the Italian Dolomites—shot for KAVU outdoor wear—garnered him Grand Prize in our annual competition The Great Outdoors (open for entries for 2016 at www.greatoutdoorscontest.com). We asked Wheatcroft to talk about the striking award-winning image and what goes into his outdoor photography.

PDN: How long have you been shooting professionally, and how would you describe your style?

Woods Wheatcroft: I earned my first photography paycheck in my early 20s and have now been full time for about 16 years. My style is very much connected to the life I choose to live: fun, spontaneous, authentic, humorous. I am most happy capturing the in-between moments.

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Two beachgoers are caught by an unexpected shorebreak wave in Baja California, Mexico. Photo © Woods Wheatcroft

PDN: Where are some unique locations that your travel work has brought you to?

WW: Unique and memorable travel locations for me include Japan, Nicaragua, Baffin Island in Canada, and the west coast of Scotland, to name a few. Baja California, Mexico, is still my favorite.

PDN: What’s the story behind your Grand Prize image from The Great Outdoors?

WW: That image was taken on a two-week trip through Europe with a group of sponsored wing-suit jumpers. KAVU is one of my long-time clients and I shot stills for them on a multimedia shoot. We traveled to Switzerland, Italy and France. This particular image was taken in the Sass Pordoi region of the Dolomites in Italy. Ironically, two days after this image was taken our car was broken into and all of my camera gear was stolen. That hurt. I shot the remainder of the trip on a Polaroid and a cardboard disposable camera I bought at a gas station!

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Wingsuit BASE jumpers leaving the exit point in the Sass Pordoi area of the Italian Dolomites. Grand Prize winning image of The Great Outdoors. Photo © Woods Wheatcroft

PDN: Was there only one opportunity to get that shot, or did the BASE jumpers do multiple runs?

WW: There are few angles and options to shoot wing-suiters. I will say there was only one opportunity to shot this particular moment because of the weather closing in. The BASE jumpers did do multiple runs but this was the last jump of this day, as the clouds filled the exit point. We were in a downpour shortly after this. We did explore another angle that involved a three-hour hike to be in the middle of their flight as they flew past a cliff. That result was an award winner as well.

PDN: Are there any rules you live by when photographing outdoor work?

WW: Rule 1: Any rule I give myself, I must be willing to break it at anytime. The moment rarely repeats. Besides that, I always try discover and explore new angles—such as my experience with the BASE jumpers—and not just ones that take five or 10 minutes. I think about the bigger environment and do my best to pre-visualize how the subject will best communicate in that space. Other rules of thumb: Always keep shooting until you “feel” you have it, and love what you do! I love my life outside of my photographic pursuits, and it feeds me and inspires me. Wherever life takes me, I usually take my camera.

Enter this year’s edition of The Great Outdoors at www.greatoutdoorscontest.com before the June 30, 2016 deadline. See more from Woods Wheatcroft at www.woodswheatcroft.com.

May 17th, 2016

The Curator Final Deadline

Submissions for The Curator Fine-Art Awards will close in one week. Enter your work by May 24 to be considered for our annual group exhibition, returning this summer to Foley Gallery in New York City. Other prizes include $3,500 cash, $200 to B&H Photo, print exposure in the August “Fine-Art Photography” issue of PDN and on pdnonline.com, and the chance to be featured in The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth blog. Enter at pdncuratorawards.com.

JURY

MARYANN CAMILLERI
Founder, The Magenta Foundation
Director, Flash Forward Festival Boston

MICHAEL FOLEY
Director
Foley Gallery

ELIZABETH RENSTROM
Photo Editor
VICE

THEA TRAFF
Associate Photo Editor
The New Yorker

AMY WOLFF
Co-Founder & Creative Director
CoEdit Collection

thecurator_eblast4b

 

April 15th, 2016

How Winning Three Pulitzers Changed William Snyder’s Career

From William Snyder's Pulitzer Prize-winning story about subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. ©William Snyder

From William Snyder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning story about subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. ©William Snyder

In anticipation of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize announcements on Monday, we talked to photographers who have won in the past about how the prize affected their careers. Today, William Snyder talks about his experience as a three-time Pulitzer winner during his tenure as a staff photographer at the Dallas Morning News. In 1989, he shared the prize for Explanatory Journalism with two colleagues. In 1991, he won the Feature Photography prize for his story about children living in subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. He shared the 1993 prize for Spot News with colleague Ken Geiger for their coverage of the 1992 Summer Olympics. Snyder also led the Dallas Morning News photo team that won 2006 Breaking News Photography prize for coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Snyder is currently chair of the photojournalism program at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

PDN: What went through your mind the first time you won a Pulitzer?
William Snyder: I was really excited. It’s one of those things you dream of. My little tiny disappointment was that it wasn’t in photography, but that’s just being selfish.

PDN: How did the subsequent wins compare?
WS: The [second] one was for a story I did on Romanian orphans that was near and dear to my heart, that I really worked hard on, and it was all my story. I could die happy. I felt like I accomplished something.

William Snyder, in his "lucky" Pulitzer shirt, celebrates in 2006 with the Dallas Morning News photo team that won the prize for Breaking News Photography. ©Mei-Chun Jau/Dallas Morning News

William Snyder, in his “lucky” Pulitzer shirt, celebrates with the Dallas Morning News photo team that won the 2006 prize for Breaking News Photography. ©Mei-Chun Jau/Dallas Morning News

PDN: Does winning the Pulitzer go to your head–not your head, of course, but a photographer’s head?
WS: On the eve of winning the first one, I was talking to the executive editor. He said to me, “Grace and humility William, after this happens.” I said, “If you’re worried about that, I can’t be any bigger of an asshole than I already am.”

We all know stories that have been great, and photographs that have been fantastic, that haven’t won. Is there luck involved? Are there things that are out of your control that are involved? Absolutely.  What I learned was:  You don’t rest on your laurels. You’ve got to keep working, day in and day out.

PDN: Is there a burden to winning?
WS: I’ve heard of people who win once and they’re frozen, because they’re so afraid that everyone’s going to be looking at them to produce something of Pulitzer quality every time they walk out the gate. There’s only a burden if you let there be a burden.

PDN: Did you always dream of winning the Pulitzer? Was that the Holy Grail for you?
WS: It wasn’t the Holy Grail, but it was pretty close. I never won Photographer of the Year in POY. This is the sick thing about me: I feel incomplete because I never won that. That should tell you about me: I was never satisfied. That’s the kind of person I am. [As journalists] we want to do great work, but we want the medals, because the medals live even longer than the great work.

PDN: What do you mean?
WS: There are people who you know as “Pulitzer Prize winner” and you have never seen their work. You’ve never read their book, seen their play, heard their music, but you see that phrase, and you know they’re good.

PDN: Is the Pulitzer as coveted as it used to be, after the decimation of the newspaper business? Does it have the cache that it used to?
WS: I think more so now. [Now] it’s difficult to win for a picture you happen upon. Most Pulitzers now are for involved stories, whether they’re news or features, right? So if you win a Pulitzer now, you’ve put in the time. You’ve done a great story. In an age when many media companies say “good enough is good enough,” the Pulitzer is still the high water mark, the beacon.

PDN: Did anything change for you after you won?
WS: The first one, absolutely not.

PDN: How about the second one?
WS: There were a ton of offers for lectures, workshops and freelance gigs. My boss just said, “Do ‘em.” Also it was the main reason I was accepted as a Michigan Journalism Fellow (now called the Knight-Wallace Fellowships) and why I was chosen as the inaugural James Burke Fellow.

Things really changed after I won the third Pulitzer. My boss and I got along better. There wasn’t this constant conflict. I just wanted to be able to work. That was the best thing about it: Just to be able to do the work, and be supported. From 1993 to 1998, when I stopped shooting, those were the four or five best years of my career because I was supported and listened to. Did I get what I wanted all the time? Absolutely not.

PDN: Why did you give up the shooting?
WS: There was no one reason. I was traveling a lot back then. I was getting burnout, and I had two young boys I wanted to see grow up and spend some time with. I got to the point where I saw nothing on the horizon—no story that I wanted to do–and my boss was pushing me to be an editor.

PDN: What’s your advice to this year’s Pulitzer winners?
WS: Enjoy it, and then go back to work. If you watch the end of Patton [1971 Oscar winner for Best Picture], he’s talking about how in the old days, there’d be this great parade, and the triumphant warrior would come in with the adjutant standing behind [him], holding the golden crown over his head, and whispering in his ear, “All glory is fleeting.” And that’s it: Enjoy it, and then you gotta go back to work.

Related:
How Winning a Pulitzer Changed Deanne Fitzmaurice’s Career

April 13th, 2016

How Winning a Pulitzer Changed Deanne Fitzmaurice’s Career

Saleh draws an airplane dropping bombs, after nurses taped a felt-tipped pen to his arm in an effort to soothe him. ©Deanne Fitzmaurice

Saleh draws an airplane dropping bombs, after nurses taped a felt-tipped pen to his arm in an effort to soothe him. ©Deanne Fitzmaurice

The 2016 Pulitzer Prize winners will be announced on Monday, April 18, marking the 100th awarding of the prizes since they were initiated in 1917. We recently asked photojournalist Deanne Fitzmaurice how winning the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature photography has affected her career. Now a contributor to Sports Illustrated, ESPN the Magazine, National Geographic and other publications, Fitzmaurice was a staff photographer at the San Francisco Chronicle when she won her Pulitzer. The story she won for was about an Iraqi boy named Saleh who was undergoing treatment at an Oakland hospital after he was nearly killed by an explosion in Iraq.

PDN: What went through your mind when you heard your name read?
Deanne Fitzmaurice: it was complete disbelief. I had been a staff photographer at the Chronicle for maybe 15 years. I thought the Pulitzer was so far out of my reach. But it was a story I felt was so important for people to see, and winning the Pulitzer brought it to a much larger audience.

PDN: What immediate effect did winning the Pulitzer have on your career?
DF: The Chronicle pretty much said, What do you want to work on? It gave me independence to work on stories I really cared about. But in some ways, life was back to normal two weeks later. I was out on assignment for the real estate section, photographing a guy who was up on a ladder. He goes, “Gee, wouldn’t it be funny if I fell off the ladder? You’d probably end up winning a Pulitzer if I did.” And I said, “You’re not going to believe this, but a couple weeks ago I actually did win the Pulitzer.” I’m sure he didn’t believe me.

Deanne Fitzmaurice hears she has won a Pulitzer Prize, April 4, 2005. ©AP Photo/San Francisco Chronicle, Brant Ward

Deanne Fitzmaurice, reacting to the news that she had won a Pulitzer Prize, April 4, 2005. ©AP Photo/San Francisco Chronicle, Brant Ward

PDN: Does it go to your head? Don’t you think, “Why am I shooting these stupid real estate assignments? I’ve won the Pulitzer!”
DF: I didn’t want the other staff photographers to think I was a prima donna, so I wanted to do those ordinary, everyday assignments. Of course, I wanted to do some high level, in-depth projects as well.

There was another funny story about people’s reactions. I was at a wedding, the priest had heard I won the Pulitzer, and he was telling everyone. After the ceremony, he got really drunk, and well into the reception, he’s still telling people about my award, but at that point, he’s telling people I had won the Nobel Peace Prize.

PDN: The Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize are among the few prizes you get to wear for the rest of your life, like: “I’m a  Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer.”
DF: Right, and sometimes it’s awkward–you feel weird doing that, like you’re full of yourself, but at the same time, you’re proud of it and it’s important.

PDN: What effect has it had on your career in the long run?
DF: I stayed at the San Francisco Chronicle as a staff photographer for three years after winning. A lot of opportunities came to me, and I became really busy.

PDN: Who was calling? What kinds of projects?
DF: There was a Pulitzer exhibit in some museum in Minneapolis. Some [art] buyers happened to see it, and they were looking for a photographer to work a project for Target. It was a commercial project but they wanted it shot in a photojournalistic style for Target. So they contacted me, and I got that project, and that was great. I was working on weekends doing things like that. I reached a point where I was too busy, and I was making a decision: Do I stay as a staff photographer, or take this moment to try to make it as a freelancer? I spent about six months of sleepless nights. I thought, photographers are getting laid off, the industry is changing, and I’m thinking of walking away from a perfectly good job. But I thought, If I’m ever going to do this, now is the time. I think I would have regretted if I didn’t, so I took a chance. I was scared to death, walking away. If I had stayed at the Chronicle, my life wouldn’t have changed that much. By going independent, it has given me lots of options and lots of opportunities.

PDN: Does winning the Pulitzer carry any kind of burden?
DF: After I won the Pulitzer, I was putting pressure on myself, saying, “You need to continue working at this level.” I didn’t want to be a one-hit wonder. The feeling that I could produce that kind of work, I wanted to keep doing that.

PDN: What’s your advice to photographers about how to make the most of it if they win?
DF: When you win, your phone is going to start ringing like crazy, your inbox is going to fill up and there are going to be lots of opportunities to to go out and talk about your work and your process. It’s easy for it to become a distraction. After I won, I spent the following year doing speaking engagements and other things related to that project. It was a great honor and privilege, but then I felt like: enough talking, just start producing some work.

Related:
Photography Pulitzers Go to Daniel Berehulak, St. Louis Post-Dispatch Staff (for PDN subscribers)
Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography (for PDN subscribers)
Instagram: @deannefitzmaurice

April 4th, 2016

Video Pick: Magnus Wennman Pushes Boundaries with “Fatima’s Drawings”

FATIMA’S DRAWINGS from Magnus Wennman on Vimeo.

Among three finalists for the World Press Photo short form multimedia prize is Magnus Wennman’s outstanding 5-1/2 minute video called “Fatima’s Drawings.” His “Where the Children Sleep” project was widely published last year, and “Fatima’s Drawings” is a continuation of his work documenting the plight of refugee children from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. The video features a five-year-old Syrian refugee in Sweden, recounting (in a voiceover) the trauma and loss she experienced in Syria and while fleeing to Europe. It’s an example of spare, exquisite filmmaking, with care and attention to all the creative and technical details, from the storyboarding and shooting, to the sound recording and mixing, to the atmospheric hue of the lighting. It also includes animation: Wennman shows Fatima by the light of a window, making stick-figure drawings of scenes from her past. One shows her playing with the best friend she left behind in Idlib, Syria; another shows airplanes bombing her old neighborhood. The drawings suddenly come to life as the camera lingers overhead. Some purists might argue the technique strains the limits of journalism, but Wennman’s video adds up to more than the sum of its individual parts, and documentary storytelling doesn’t get much better than this.

Related:
Video Pick: “Denali,” Film about Photographer Ben Moon and His Dog, Goes Viral
Video Pick: Chris Jordan’s “Midway,” on Beauty in Environmental Activism

March 17th, 2016

Japanese Photographer Daisuke Yokota Wins €20,000 Foam Paul Huf Award

Untitled, 2015, From the series Color Photographs © Daisuke Yokota / Courtesy G/P Gallery

Untitled, 2015, From the series Color Photographs © Daisuke Yokota / Courtesy G/P Gallery

Foam, the Amsterdam-based photography museum, has awarded the 10th annual Paul Huf Award to Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota. The award includes an exhibition at Foam, publication in the organization’s magazine and a €20,000 ($22,642) prize. Named for Dutch photographer Paul Huf, who helped establish Foam, the award supports emerging photographers of any nationality under the age of 35.

“Yokota has established a formidable reputation as a young artist who has the ability to take photography forward into ever more original directions; from prints, to artist’s books, installations, and collaborative performance, and always with a distinctive and unmistakable visual language,” said Tate London’s Simon Baker, chairman of the jury, in a statement.

The other jurors were: curator and editor Joshua Chuang; Lucy Conticello, Director of Photography at M, Le Monde; Felix Hoffmann, chief curator at C/O Berlin; and Thyago Nogueira, the head of contemporary photography at Moreira Salles Institute and editor ZUM photography Magazine.

The jurors selected Daisuke from a pool of 97 nominees from 29 countries.

Previous Paul Huf award-winners include Taryn Simon, Mikhael Subotzky, Pieter Hugo, Léonie Hampton-Purchas, Alexander Gronsky, Raphaël Dallaporta, Alex Prager, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Daniel Gordon and Momo Okabe.

Related: Gideon Mendel Wins $50,000 Pollock Prize for Creativity
An Interview with Foam’s Marcel Feil (Login required)
Momo Okabe Wins the Foam Paul Huf Award 2015

March 15th, 2016

Aragón Renuncio Wins $120K Grand Prize in International Photo Contest

Antonio Aragón Renuncio's grand-prize winning image, shot in Togo. ©Antonio Aragón Renuncio

$120,000 grand prize winner of the 2016 Hamdan International Photography Award competition. ©Antonio Aragón Renuncio

Antonio Aragón Renuncio of Spain has won the $120,000 grand prize in the Hamdan International Photography Award (HIPA) competition in Dubai. The theme of the competition was “Happiness.” Aragón won the prize for an image of happy kids chasing motorcycle tires outside of an NGO clinic in Togo. Winners were announced yesterday at a ceremony in Dubai.

The HIPA competition, now in its fifth year, is sponsored by Dubai’s crown prince Sheikh Hamdan Bin Mohammed Al Maktoum, a 33-year-old photography enthusiast. Previous HIPA grand prize winners include Anurag Kumar of India (2015); Fuyang Zhou of China (2014); and Osama Al Zubaidi of United Arab Emirates (2013).

Winners of $25,000 first-place prizes in other 2016 contest categories were Francisco Negroni Rodgriquez of Chile (General category); Khaled Al Sabbah of the Palestinian Territory (Father and Son category); Hameed Husain Isa of Bahrain (Happiness category); and Steve Winter of the US (Wildlife category). No first place winner was announced in the Wildlife category, but Lynn Emery of the UK won second prize.

Organizers announced second, third, fourth and fifth place awards in each category, with prizes of $12,000, $10,00, $8,000 and $6,000, respectively.

Special awards included the $20,000 Photography Appreciation Award, which went to Oscar Mitri; and the $25,000 Photographic Research/Report Award, won by Don McCullin.

Organizers said more than 80,000 photographs were submitted for the competition. The entries were judged by David Maitland, Frans Lanting, Maggie Steber, Michael Lohmann, Michael Pritchard, Michael Yamashita, Monica Allende, Phillip S. Block and Stephen Mayes.

More information about the competition is available online at the HIPA website.

February 29th, 2016

Andrew Ellis, Casper Dalhoff, Stephen Dupont and National Geographic Win Top Awards in Late Round POYi Judging

From "A Commitment to Life" by Casper Dalhoff, winner of the World Understanding Award at the 2016 POYi competition. ©Casper Dalhoff

From “A Commitment to Life” by Casper Dalhoff, winner of the Community Awareness Award at the 2016 POYi competition. ©Casper Dalhoff

Andrew Ellis of MediaStorm has won Multimedia Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd anual Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, while National Geographic has won Documentary Project of the Year and the Angus McDougall Overall Excellence in Editing Award.

Ellis submitted a portfolio that included stories about a farmer at risk of losing his farm because of drought in California, and a video game collector who has been selling his collection to care for his family. National Geographic won Documentary Project of the Year honors for its November 2015 single topic issue on climate change

The awards were announced late Friday after judging ended for the Visual Editing Division of the three-week competition.

Winners of top awards in other divisions included Casper Dalhoff, who won the Community Awareness Award for his project titled “A Commitment to Life,” about life in a home for the mentally and physically disabled in Denmark. Stephen Dupont won the Best Photography Book award for his book Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars 1993-2012.

As previously announced in PDN, Reportage Division winners included Paolo Marchetti, who won Photographer of the Year honors, and Hossein Fatemi, who won the World Understanding Award. In the News Division, Carolyn Van Houten of the San Antonio Express-News won Newspaper Photographer of the Year, while Al Bello of Getty Images won Sports Photographer of the Year in the Sports Division.

Judging took place at the Missouri School of Journalism from February 8-26. News Division judges were Muhammed Muheisen, Marvin Joseph, Mary F. Calvert and Michael Hamtil. Judges for the Sports Division were Wally Skalij, Nate Gordon, and Seth Greenberg, and Reportage Division judges were Ken Geiger, Jane Evelyn Atwood, Janet Jarman, and Matt Campbell. Editing Division judges were Travis Fox, Deb Pastner, Leslie dela Vega, and Pat Davison.

The judges selected winners in 40 categories. A complete list of winners and runners up, as well as their entries, are posted at POYi.org.

Related:
Paolo Marchetti, Carolyn Van Houten and Al Bello Are Top POYi Winners So Far

February 22nd, 2016

Paolo Marchetti, Carolyn Van Houten and Al Bello Are Top POYi Winners So Far

From "The Price of Vanity," by Paolo Marchetti, winner of Reportage Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd annual POYi competition. ©Paolo Marchetti

From “The Price of Vanity” by Paolo Marchetti, winner of Reportage Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd annual POYi competition. ©Paolo Marchetti

Photographer Paolo Marchetti has won Reportage Photographer of the Year in the 73rd annual Picture of the Year International competition. His portfolio, selected as the winner over the weekend, includes stories about exploited and abused children around the world, and the industrial harvesting of animal hides for the fashion business. The latter project, called “The Price of Vanity,” also won first prize in the Science & Natural History Picture Story category.

Other POYI winners so far include Newspaper Photographer of the Year Carolyn van Houten of the San Antonio Express-News. Her portfolio includes stories about the oil bust in south Texas and the aftermath of the May 2015 floods in Blanco, Texas.

Al Bello of Getty Images won Sports Photographer of the Year honors for a portfolio that shows Bello’s eye for decisive moments, as well as dramatic action, light, and camera angles.

Francine Orr of the Los Angeles Times won top prize for Issue Reporting Story in the newspaper category for her story about families living on the social and economic margins in a down-and-out motel.

Végh László of Magyar Nemzet, a Hungarian daily, won first prize for Feature Picture Story in the newspaper category for a project titled “Subcarpathia in the shadow of the Russian-Ukranian War.”

Photographer Hossein Fatemi won POYi’s World Understanding award for his portfolio titled “An Iranian Journey,” about the hidden complexity and modernity of Iranian society.

Brent Stirton, recent winner of National Geographic Photographer’s Award, has won POYi’s Environmental Vision award for his project about the ivory wars in central Africa.

Iranian photographer Sadegh Souri won first place in the Issue Reporting Story category for her project about young Iranian women on death row, called “Waiting for Capital Punishment”

POYi contest judging began February 8 and continues through February 26. Winners have been selected in more than two dozens newspapers, sports and reportage categories so far, but POYi has a tradition of withholding the names of winners until all judging is competed. This week, judges will select winners for the competition’s editing categories, which include Documentary Project of the Year and Multimedia Photographer of the Year.

January 12th, 2016

Preserve the Moment: A Photo Contest Sponsored by Moment and Preservation & Creation™

MomentGen-550[2]

Here’s what happens when two brands, with similar missions, come together. Moment, known for equipping photographers with the best mobile lenses on the market, has joined with Preservation & Creation, makers of premium photo print products, to celebrate the art of photography.

At Moment and Preservation & Creation we share a mutual appreciation and passion for the process behind exceptional photography and the tangible prints it creates. Moment lenses make it possible to get perfect shots without lugging traditional camera equipment around. While Preservation & Creation creates photo prints, books, and canvases that Preserve the Unforgettable™ moments captured.

With so much in common it only made sense to bring our two worlds together. That’s where Preserve the Moment was born—a photo contest that challenges photographers to pick & submit their best moment photo of 2015.

10 winners will be chosen based on the most liked photos and announced via email and facebook on January 26, 2016. To enter simply submit your favorite photo from this past year for a chance to win $100 to spend in the Preservation & Creation shop on custom photo products—plus, a Moment lens in your choice of wide, tele, or macro—made for iPhone, Android & Nexus phones.

Enter to win at http://bit.ly/1RHfMep