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January 12th, 2016

Preserve the Moment: A Photo Contest Sponsored by Moment and Preservation & Creation™

MomentGen-550[2]

Here’s what happens when two brands, with similar missions, come together. Moment, known for equipping photographers with the best mobile lenses on the market, has joined with Preservation & Creation, makers of premium photo print products, to celebrate the art of photography.

At Moment and Preservation & Creation we share a mutual appreciation and passion for the process behind exceptional photography and the tangible prints it creates. Moment lenses make it possible to get perfect shots without lugging traditional camera equipment around. While Preservation & Creation creates photo prints, books, and canvases that Preserve the Unforgettable™ moments captured.

With so much in common it only made sense to bring our two worlds together. That’s where Preserve the Moment was born—a photo contest that challenges photographers to pick & submit their best moment photo of 2015.

10 winners will be chosen based on the most liked photos and announced via email and facebook on January 26, 2016. To enter simply submit your favorite photo from this past year for a chance to win $100 to spend in the Preservation & Creation shop on custom photo products—plus, a Moment lens in your choice of wide, tele, or macro—made for iPhone, Android & Nexus phones.

Enter to win at http://bit.ly/1RHfMep

January 6th, 2016

Documentary Photographers: Contest Deadlines Approaching Fast

Marzell Williamson plays the tuba, by Jerry Wolford, winner of Photojournalist of the Year honors at last year's Best of Photojournalism competition. ©News & Record/Jerry Wolford Photojournalism 2015 Ph

Marzell Williamson plays the tuba, Greensboro, NC. Jerry Wolford won Photojournalist of the Year honors for a portfolio including this image, at last year’s Best of Photojournalism competition. ©News & Record/Jerry Wolford

Winter is the height of the photojournalism contest season, and entry deadlines are fast approaching for a number of international competitions. Among them are:

The World Press Photo entry deadline is January 13, although entrants must register by January 7. (Multimedia entries are due by  January 20.) There is no entry fee, but participants must provide proof of their professional status.  This year’s contest is subject to a new code of ethics and strict new rules about photo manipulation, as well as other rule changes. See the contest website for details. Photo contest winners will be announced February 18. The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2015 will receive a cash prize of 10,000 EUR, and winners in all categories will be invited to travel to Amersterdam for an awards ceremony in April at the expense of World Press Photo organizers.

Entries for the 73rd POYi competition are due by January 15. The competition includes multiple categories in photojournalism, multimedia, and visual editing divisions. The entry fee is $50. Prizes are primarily bragging rights and exposure, but winners of several premier categories also receive modest cash awards–$1,000 for Photographer of the Year and $500 for Newspaper Photographer of the Year, for instance. Judging takes place from February 8-25 at the Missouri School of Journalism, which sponsors the contest. Details and rules are on the POYi website.

Photo entries for the Eyes of History competition are due January 15. The competition is sponsored by the White News Photographers Association. The entry fee is $67. The competition has other divisions with different entry due dates: video entries are due January 29, multimedia entries are due January 31, and student entries are due February 1. The entry fees for those divisions also vary. All divisions except the student division are open to WHNP members only. See the WHNP website for complete details.

Best of Photojournalism entries are due by January 29. The contest, which is sponsored by National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), is open to NPPA members and non-members alike. There is no entry fee, and there are no monetary prizes (just bragging rights and plaques). Like POYi, BOP includes still photo, multimedia and editing divisions, plus a video division. Contest details and rules are available on the NPPA website. No date has been set for announcing winners, but winners for past competitions have been announced in March or April.

The deadline for entering PDN’s Photo Annual competition is February 3. In addition to photojournalism/documentary and video/multimedia categories, the competition categories include: advertising, editorial, photo books, sports, self-promotion, stock photography, personal work and student work. The entry fee is $50 for single images, and $60 for each series of images. Cash awards total more than $20,000. Contest information and rules are available at the PDN Photo Annual website.

The Piclet.org International Prize for Contemporary African Photography  (POPCAP) is accepting entries until February 7. The prize is for work about Africa or the diaspora of an African country. Entrants must submit a single series or story consisting of 10 to 25 images. There is no entry fee. The prizes include an artists’ residency. Finalists will be announced February 29, and five winners will be announced March 7. Past winners include Zed Nelson, Léonard Pongo, Anoek Steketee, Patrick Willocq, and Cristina de Middel. Full details and rules are available at the POPCAP website.

Entries for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, sponsored by Natural History Museum in London, are due by February 25. “Judges are looking for outstanding images that raise awareness of nature’s beauty and fragility, while also championing the highest ethical standards in wildlife photography,” according to the contest website. Entrants may submit up to 25 images. The entry fee is £30.00 ($44). Top prize is £10,000 ($14,675) for Best Single Image, but the competition awards monetary prizes in a number of categories. Winners will be notified May 13. Past winners include Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols, Greg du Toit, and Paul Nicklen. Full contest details are available at the WPY website.

Related:
After Staged-Photo Debacle, World Press Changes Rules

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year Honors at 2015 POYi Competition

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize (PDN subscription required)

May 6th, 2015

View the PDN Photo Annual 2015 Winners’ Gallery

Screen shot 2015-05-06 at 12.26.56 PM

Pictured: A portrait of actor Michael Keaton, photographed by Art Streiber for Entertainment Weekly, from the Magazine/Editorial category in the 2015 PDN Photo Annual.

PDN is proud to present the winners of the 2015 Photo Annual. The online gallery is now live at www.pdnphotoannual.com/gallery/2015.

The PDN Photo Annual, now in its 15th year, is a celebration of innovative work by photographers from all over the world. The 2015 competition drew thousands of entries in ten categories, including Advertising/Corporate Work, Magazine/Editorial, Photojournalism/Documentary, Sports, Self-Promotion, Photo Books, Personal Work, Stock Photography, Video, and Student Work.

Entries to the 2015 PDN Photo Annual competition were judged by a panel of 29 industry professionals. They included James Estrin, co-founder of The New York Times Lens blog; Gregory Heisler, distinguished professor of photography at Syracuse University; Teru Kuwayama, Facebook photo community manager; Michael Norseng, Esquire director of photography; Aidan Sullivan, vice president of photo assignments at Getty Images; Jody Quon, New York magazine photography director; Susan White, Vanity Fair director of photography; Patrick Witty, WIRED director of photography; and other jurors.

Over 200 winners have been honored in this year’s competition, in addition to six special award winners presented by The Arnold & Augusta Newman Foundation, the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund and Parsons The New School For Design, PDN, Epson and Sony. Nancy Borowick, a New York-based photographer, will be receiving the $15,000 Arnold Newman Prize; Helsinki-based photographer Meeri Koutaniemi will receive the $5,000 Marty Forscher Fund professional award and Syracuse University student Alexandra Hootnick will receive the $3,000 student award.

March 11th, 2015

Tim Matsui, TIME Win Top Prizes in 2015 World Press Multimedia Contest

Time magazine has won first prize for short documentary in the World Press Photo contest for film titled Behind the Video of Eric Garner’s Deadly Confrontation With New York Police. In the long feature category, photographer Tim Matsui has won first prize for The Long Night, a documentary he produced in conjunction with MediaStorm about teenage prostitution in Seattle. Last month, Matsui won POYi’s Documentary Project of the Year for the film.

A film titled {The And}, which explores the dynamics of relationships between couples, won first prize for Interactive Documentary. It was written and directed by Topaz Adizes and Nathan Phillips

Runners up in the multimedia competition included The New York Times, which won second place in the short documentary category for a video by Ben C. Solomon about the Ebola outbreak in Monrovia. Carlos Spottorno won third prize for his video called At the Gates of Europe, about a wave of refugees from Africa since the Arab Spring uprisings. (more…)

March 4th, 2015

World Press Photo Disqualifies Controversial Prize Winner

After questions over whether Giovanni Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about his "Dark Heart of Europe" project.

After questions over whether Giovanni Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about his “Dark Heart of Europe” project.

World Press Photo has revoked a prize awarded last month to photographer Giovanni Troilo, on the grounds that Troilo’s entry “was not in compliance with the entry rules,” according to an announcement on the World Press Photo web site. (more…)

March 3rd, 2015

Controversial World Press Photo Winner Under New Scrutiny Today (Update)

After questions over whether Giovanni Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about his "Dark Heart of Europe" project.

© Giovanni Troilo. After questions over whether Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about the integrity of his “Dark Heart of Europe” project.

Photographer Giovanni Troilo’s controversial prize-winning entry to the World Press Photo competition is under new scrutiny today because of reports that Troilo did not shoot one of the images where he said he shot it, according to Lars Boering, Managing Director of World Press Photo.

Troilo had said his project, “The Dark Heart of Europe,” winner of 1st prize stories in the Contemporary Issues category, was shot in Charleroi, a town near Brussels.

But a journalist investigating the project in the wake of controversy it has generated has reported that one of the images was shot in Brussels, which is 50 km from Carhleroi.

“There’s new information out now that one photo was shot 50 kilometers away from Charleroi,” Boering says. Bruno Stevens, a Belgian photojournalist,  announced the finding on his Facebook page.

“Of course this is going to be looked at again,” says Boering, who has been on the hot seat for several days over the controversy surrounding the Troilo project and prize. (more…)

February 23rd, 2015

Ed Kashi, Tim Matsui Win Top Multimedia Prizes at 2015 POYi

From "Syria's Lost Generation," by 2015 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year Ed Kashi. ©Ed Kashi

From “Syria’s Lost Generation,” by 2015 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year Ed Kashi. ©Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi has won Multimedia Photographer of the Year honors at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition for his project called Syria’s Lost Generation, while Tim Matsui won Documentary Project of the Year for The Long Night, a film he produced with MediaStorm about teenage prostitution.

Winners of other categories in POYi’s Visual Editing Division included Katie Falkenberg of the Los Angeles Times, who won first place in the Motion News Story category for a story about a Utah town torn apart by an FBI sting operation; Eugene Richards, winner of the Motion Feature Story prize for his project in the Arkansas delta called Red Ball of Sun Slipping Down; and Lisa Krantz and Jessica Belasco of the San Antonio Express-News, first place winners of the Motion Issue Reporting category for “A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity.”

Earlier this month, during judging for POYi’s Reportage Division, Krantz won the 2015 Community Awareness Award for the obesity project.

Judging for the Visual Editing Division ended Friday. The category included a number of editing awards for magazines and newspapers.  National Geographic magazine took Best Publication honors. The Los Angeles Times won first place for Editing Portfolio-Newspaper, while Time magazine won the top prize for Editing Portfolio-Magazine.

A complete list of the 72nd annual POYi contest winners is available online. Links to galleries of the winning entries are also on the site.

Related:

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors
PDN Video Pick: A Spotlight on Underage Victims of the Illegal Sex Trade

February 18th, 2015

Gerd Ludwig Wins POYi’s Best Photo Book of the Year Award

Gerd Ludwig has won the 2015 POYi Best Photo Book of the Year honors for The Long Shadow of Chernobyl, his book about the lingering environmental, social, and economic consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The award, part of the Reportage Division of the POYi competition, was announced on the POYi web site.

Ludwig’s book stands out as a case study in the challenges of photo book publishing. Not only did he pursue the project at great personal risk, as he explained in this PDN video interview last year, but he struggled to find support. He undertook two separate Kickstarter campaigns to fund his travel to Chernobyl, as well as the printing and distribution of the book.

Gerd Ludwig: The Long Shadow of Chernobyl from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

The project dates back to 1993, when Ludwig first visited Chernobyl while working on a story for National Geographic. “From that point on, I always wanted to return,” because he didn’t get as much access as he had hoped for, he told PDN last year.

He  returned in 2005, after Ukraine’s so-called Orange Revolution enabled him to gain better access. He planned to return again in 2011, on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the disaster. “The general media was not interested,” he said, so he collected funds for the 2011 trip through a Kickstarter campaign.

Ludwig left for Chernobyl while his Kickstarter campaign was still underway, and while he was there, the Fukushima nuclear disaster occurred in Japan. That stimulated more contributions to Ludwig’s Kickstarter campaign–a total of $23,316, which was almost twice his goal of $12,000. After his return, he used the extra money to publish an iPad app titled The Long Shadow of Chernobyl.

With plans to produce a printed book in time for the 30th anniversary of the disaster, in 2016, Ludwig made another trip to Chernobyl in 2013 on an $8,200 grant from Kulturwerk der VG Bild/Kunst, a German artists’ rights organization.

Meanwhile, publisher Lois Lammerhuber of Lammerhuber Editions (Austria) had approached him at the Lumix Festival of Young Photojournalism in Hanover, Germany. “He said, ‘I want to do your book,’but then the  distributor said to him, ‘Bad news doesn’t sell and Chernobyl is bad news,'” Ludwig recounted.

So he and Lammerhuber turned to Kickstarter once again in the spring of 2014, and managed to raise $45,571–well over twice his goal of $20,000–in pre-order book sales.

In a telephone interview today, Ludwig emphasized that the total funding he raised on Kickstarter “sounds like a high number” but only covered his expenses for the production and printing, and helped promote the project “It’s not a money maker,” Ludwig says. “If I count all my time, I definitely didn’t make money on this project. It’s a labor of love and an important piece of history that should be told. It’s a warning, a document to human hubris.”

Ludwig says he is continuing work on the project, and most recently had a story published in National Geographic about tourism inside the Chernobyl exclusion zone. “There are constant surprises” at Chernobyl, he says, and it stands as an archetype of nuclear disaster. “From Chernobyl, you can see what’s going to happen to these other areas” like Fukushima, he says.

Related:
Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

February 17th, 2015

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia last September. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Australian photographer Daniel Berehulak of Getty Images has won Photographer of the Year honors in the Reportage Division of the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, which is currently underway at the University of Missouri in Columbia. Paul Hansen of Sweden and Daniel Rodrigues of Portugal were the first and second runners up, respectively.

Berehulak’s winning portfolio emphasized his coverage of the Ebola crisis in West Africa. It also included stories about national elections in India, the economic downturn in Brazil, and single images from stories in Somalia, Afghanistan, and Kenya.

In other POYi Reportage Division categories, Lisa Krantz (USA) won the Community Awareness Award for her project titled “A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity.”  Finalists for the award included Mario Tama (USA), Toni Greaves (USA), April Saul (USA) and Kuang Huimin (China). (Krantz also won second place for her obesity project in the Issue Reporting Picture Story category of the POYi competition’s Newspaper Division.)

The World Understanding Award went to Jan Grarup (Denmark) for “Somalia in Transition,” and judges awarded Special Recognition to Ryan Spencer Reed (USA) for his project titled “Despite Similarities to Reality.” Finalists for the World Understanding Award were Edu Ponces (Spain), Paula Bronstein (USA), and Renée C. Byer (USA).

David Chancellor (UK) won the Environmental Vision Award for his project “With Butterflies and Warriors.” Michael Robinson Chavez (USA) was awarded special recognition for “The Driest Season: California’s Dust Bowl.”

Other POYi Reportage Division categories and winners included:

News Picture Story: John Moore (1); Carolyn Cole (2); Arash Khamooshi (3)
Feature Picture Story: Hajdú D. András (1); Tomás Munita (2); Corrina Kern (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story: Brent Stirton (1); Alex Masi (2); Daniel Berehulak (3)
Science & Natural History Picture Story: Javier Arcenillas (1); unidentified* (2); Stuart Palley (3)
Science & Natural History: unidentified* (1); unidentified* (2); unidentified* (3)
Best Photography Book Award: TBA The Long Shadow of Chernobyl by Gerd Ludwig

Judging for the POYi competition began February 2 with News Division Entries. Winners in that division, selected last week, included Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Sports Photographer of the Year Cameron Spencer of Getty Images.

Judging for the Reportage Division took place from February 11 to February 14. The competition concludes this week with judging of the Visual Editing Division entries.

*Contest organizers have posted all the winning entries, but have not officially identified winners. Please help us name them.

Related stories:

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize

February 12th, 2015

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year Prize

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

Danish photographer Mads Nissen of the daily newspaper Politiken has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2014 prize for an image showing a gay couple during an intimate moment in St. Petersburg, Russia. The image, which was part of the news coverage last year about rising discrimination and hate crimes attacks against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Russia, also won first prize in the Contemporary Issues category of the World Press Photo competition. The winners of the contest were announced February 12 in Amsterdam.

Read the full story at PDNOnline.com.