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October 15th, 2014

2014 Eddie Adams Workshop Award Winners Announced

The annual four-day Eddie Adams Workshop for emerging photographers ended Monday with presentations by students and announcements of awards. Winners included:

Palestinian photojournalist Eman Mohammed, who received the $2,500 Chris Hondros Fund Award.

Zack Wittman, a junior at Central Michigan University, recipient of the Nikon Award, including a Nikon D4S camera, three NIKKOR zoom lenses and Speedlight flash, worth approximately $11,000.

Sean Proctor, a Michigan-based photojournalist, winner of the inaugural Bill Eppridge Memorial Award, a $1,000 cash prize. The prize was created this year in memory of the long-time LIFE photographer who died in October 2013 at age 75.

Rachel Woolf, a student at Ithaca College, who received the Colton Family Award for the student who best embodies the spirit of the workshop, including a $1,000 cash prize.

New York-based Nancy Borowick, recipient of a $1,000 grant from the visual storytelling app Storehouse for innovation in storytelling. (For more on Borowick’s work, see “Picture Story: Love in a Double Shadow of Cancer” on PDNOnline.)

Jonas Wresch, a German photographer based in Colombia, and Adriane Ohanesian, an American photographer based in Kenya, who each received a $1,000 cash award from National Geographic.

Numerous awards in the form of photo assignments and internships were given by the Associated Press, The Denver Post, Education Week, Getty Sports, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Sports Illustrated, Washington Post, a Lightbox feature on Time.com and a one-week internship at the White House.

The four-day, tuition-free workshop hosts 100 photo students and emerging pros with an international mix. Among the more than 20 workshop speakers and coaches at this year’s event were veteran photographers James Nachtwey, Eugene Richards and John White and contemporary talents Barbara Davidson, Gillian Laub, Phil Toledano and Marco Grob.

More information is available at the Eddie Adams Workshop website
www.eddieadamsworkshop.com.

October 7th, 2014

Founders of Everyday Feeds Launch @EverydayEverywhere, “Family of Man for the Modern Age”

everydayTwo years after photographer Peter DiCampo and writer Austin Merrill launched Everyday Africa to share images that defy stereotypes about the continent, the popular Instagram feed has spawned multiple imitations, including Everyday Asia, Everyday Middle East, Everyday Iran, Everyday Sri Lanka, and Everyday USA. Now photographers behind 11 of the feeds have launched @EverydayEverywhere
and have invited photographers around the world to contribute by posting images to Instagram with the hashtag #everydayeverywhere.

The central feed will share a common mission: To disseminate images that promote greater understanding of the world. “We hope that when you put this body of work together, it’s a ‘Family of Man’ in the modern age,” DiCampo says, referring to the ambitious 1955 exhibition which featured 273 photographers, “celebrating commonalities, and fighting stereotypes in each region.”

He adds that the loose roster of photographers contributing the feeds are not a photo agency or a collective. “We’re happy this has become a promotional device for [photographers] but we don’t want them participating because of that. We want them to be excited about the project.”

DiCampo says that one or two images a day will be posted to @everydayeverywhere. Guest curators, working on the feed for two weeks at a time, will select the images that appear on @everydayeverywhere. For now, current contributors to Everyday feeds will serve as curators, but the contributors plan to invite an international group of curators to participate. DiCampo explains, “We want a variety of people: photo editors, artists, scholars, thinkers, musicians.”  Since the launch of Everyday Everywhere, Grant Slater and Austin Merrill have been the first and second guest curators, selecting images that had been posted on Everyday Eastern Europe, Everyday Bangladesh, Everyday Black America, Everyday Iran and Everyday NBNJ, which shows images from New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Contributors to Everyday decided to create a centralized Everyday feed during three days of meetings at the Open Society Foundations in New York City. The meetings, held during the Photoville photo festival, where an exhibition of work from 11 feeds was hosted by Instagram, gathered more than 30 contributors from around the world, says DiCampo. Though many had previously shared advice and ideas via Skype or email, few of the contributors had met in person.

“We’ve been talking for a long time about how to organize all this, how to encourage the Everyday concept to continue spreading while at the same time having some central structure,” DiCampo says in the press release the group issued on September 30.

To support the expansion of the Everyday project, the contributors who met in New York City also formed committees to address concerns common to all the feeds. “There’s now an events committee, an educational committee, a technical committee to help,” says DiCampo, who along with Merrill has used Everyday Africa imagery to conduct a visual literacy class in the Bronx where students can contribute to Everyday Bronx. He adds that a book of images posted to Everyday Africa is also in the works.

Related Article
Picture Story: Everyday Africa on Instagram

September 3rd, 2014

Photojournalists Launch “Selfie Against the Death Penalty” Campaign

Documentary photographer Marc Asnin and VII Association, a non-profit organization founded by VII Photo Agency, have launched a social media campaign that advocates for the abolition of the death penalty.

The “Photographers Selfie Against the Death Penalty” campaign is part of a collaboration between Asnin’s Neverland Publications and VII Association on Final Words, a book and traveling exhibition that presents the final statements of 515 inmates executed in Texas since 1982. The aim of the project is to focus on “the humanity at the center of the death penalty in America,” the organizers said in a statement.

To participate, photographers are being asked to upload an image to the Final Words site, and to finish the statement “I stand against the death penalty because….” Among the photographers who have participated so far are Larry Fink, Rudy Archuleta, Anthony Barboza, Sim Chi Yin, and several members of the VII Photo Agency.

For full instructions for how to participate in the campaign, visit the Final Words site here.

April 24th, 2014

Exhibition in Bangladesh Remembers Garment Workers Who Died Tragically

lives-not-numbers-pulse

Photo © Taslima Akhter

A group exhibition currently open through the end of this week at the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute remembers the 1,134 garment workers who died on April 24, 2013 when Rana Plaza collapsed after years of neglect. The show, “1134—Lives Not Numbers,” was curated by Mahbubur Rahman and Munem Wasif, and includes contributions by photographers, performance artists, actors and others.

“Through the photographs of the needless deaths, through performance art reflecting the sorrow of the deprived, [the exhibition] attempts to leave a lasting mark on our collective psyche,” writes Pathshala founder Shahidul Alam about the exhibition.

The effort reminds us that our own understanding of this event has been heightened by the work of photographers like Taslima Akhter, whose photo of bodies in the rubble became famous around the world, and Abir Abdullah, whose project, “Deathtrap,” on the ongoing dangers of the garment factories in which millions of Bangladeshis work, won an Alexia Foundation grant.

Visit Alam’s blog to read more about this exhibition and check out a schedule of events.

February 12th, 2014

Cramped But Cool Studio: Down to the Basics in Honolulu

© Andrea Brizzi

© Andrea Brizzi

This month, in connection with The Studio Issue of PDN we’re posting the “Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase.” We’re inviting PDN readers to share images of small-but-convenient workspaces.

We kick off with photographer Andrea Brizzi’s one-room, studio-living-workspace in Honololu. It does not have much in it, but what it has is charming.

“I keep two modest studios, one in Brooklyn, the other in Hawaii. Both are outfitted with the essentials: a sofa bed, an espresso machine, a bicycle and a Mac,” Brizzi says. He can see the slope of the Diamond Head volcano out his window. He explains, “Space is scarce, so a surf board doubles as my desk and, when needed, dining table. I got rid of the horrific wall-to-wall carpet I found when I bough the place. The new floor is bamboo, floating, no nails, no glue. Bought at Home Depot, I installed it. I also threw away the window air conditioner. Not necessary here. No heating either.” Nice.

Does your workspace do double duty as living room, playroom, garage or closet? Send us an image or two, plus a description of the space and what you like about it to editor@pdnonline.com (be sure to put “Cramped but Cool” in the subject line) and we’ll be delighted to share it. The photographer whose Cramped But Cool studio gets the most positive comments and votes on our Facebook page will win a gift certificate to photo retailer B&H Photo & Video.

Coming up on the Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: a nicely renovated basement studio.

Related Article:
Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: Show Us Where You Work

February 4th, 2014

Selfie Campaign Protests Jailing of Journalists in Egypt

FreeAJ#StaffGroupTo protest the arrest and imprisonment of members of the Al Jazeera English staff in Cairo, journalists around the world are carrying out a social media campaign that asks: What if all journalists were muzzled? As part of the protest, journalists are posting self-portraits on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook showing themselves with their mouths gagged and taped. Some hold signs demanding the release of the Al Jazeera journalists. They’re posting the images with the hashtag #FreeAJstaff.

On December 29, Egyptian authorities raided the Cairo office of Al Jazeera and arrested four employees. Last week, the government announced it was charging 20 journalists affiliated with the network, including five foreigners, with inciting terrorism and being agents of the Muslim Brotherhood, the ruling party that was ousted from power by the Egyptian military in July. Journalists have been repeatedly attacked since the military took power, according to human rights and press freedom groups.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, other human rights organizations and press freedom groups have called for the immediate dismissal of the charges.

Today CNN International Correspondent Christian Amanpour held a #FreeAJStaff sign on the air.  Journalists in Nairobi have staged a protest outside the Egyptian embassy to demand the release of imprisoned Al Jazeera staffers. Among those who have been detained since December is the Nairobi-based,  Australian-born journalist Peter Greste, the East Africa correspondent for Al Jazeera.

December 17th, 2013

How About a Holiday Gift That Supports Photography?

It’s not only the season of giving. It’s your last chance to make a tax-deductible donation to a non-profit that you can list on your 2013 tax form. That’s why many of the non-profits that support new photographic work and photographic education are currently seeking support from folks who love photography. Here is a list of some we’ve heard from this holiday season. (Feel free to suggest other deserving non-profits in the comments section.)

If you’re looking for an alternative gift this season, consider a gift that says: We love photography, so let’s support it, too.

The Alexia Foundation
The Alexia Foundation has been making grants to support documentary projects on social change for over 20 years. In 2012, they created the Women’s Initiative Grant, supporting documentary photographic work on issues facing women. The first Women’s Initiative Grant winner, Tim Matsui, has just released a film of his work about the sex trafficking of minors, and the Alexia Foundation hopes to generate support for future grants.
https://www.alexiafoundation.org/donate

Aperture Foundation
Aperture Foundation, publishers of Aperture magazine and many photo books (like the new Emmet Gowin retrospective we raved about), has anchored their winter appeal this year to the news that they’re expanding Aperture’s visual-literacy program for children and teens. Learn more about their new educational program on their Winter Appeal page: http://www.aperture.org/blog/winter-appeal/

Blue Sky Gallery
In addition to hosting 21 solo exhibitions last year, the Portland, Oregon, non-profit also regularly holds artists’ talks that are free and open to the public. If you’re a resident of Oregon, you can match your contribution with a contribution to the Oregon Cultural Trust for a tax credit.
www.blueskygallery.org/who-we-are/about-bluesky/

Light Work
Light Work, the Syracuse, New York, non-profit that supports exhibitions, an artist-in-residency program, workshops and the publication Contact Sheet, is offering Light Work tote bags to anyone who donates $100 (while supplies last). Feeling more beneficent? Light Work offers portfolios for donors giving $1200 and more. www.lightwork.org/shop/donation/

Magnum Foundation
The non-profit Magnum Foundation supports in-depth, documentary photography projects through its Emergency Fund Grant, the Inge Morath Prize to a female photographer under the age of 30, its Human Rights Fellowships at New York University, and its partnerships with human rights and humanitarian aid organizations.  magnumfoundation.org/donate.html

The Aftermath Project
Through its annual grants, The Aftermath Project funds photo projects committed to telling the other side of the story of conflict: “What it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes” and cope with war’s aftermath. Their  current Kickstarter campaign, to publish the latest volume of their catalogue of grant winners, “War is Only Half the Story,”  has about 48 hours left on the campaign. A pledge to the campaign allows you to pick a reward from a range of prints and gifts. Or, you can simply write The Aftermath Project a check.

December 13th, 2013

Photog Teru Kuwayama Goes to Work at Facebook as Photo Community Liaison

Photographer Teru Kuwayama has been hired by Facebook to work as “lead photographer” and liaison between the social media site and the photo community, “advising both sides,” he says. He will also be working closely with Instagram, which is owned by Facebook.

“For me, the most important aspect of my role is that I’m the internal advocate for photographers,” he told PDN.  “I’m here to make sure that the interests of photographers are represented in everything from feature development on the technical side to the terms of service on the legal side.  So, my job is to make Facebook work for photographers, and to help photographers make the best use of the Facebook.”

The social media platform has been criticized by photo trade groups for its terms of service, which allow companies to re-use users’ content without permission or compensation.

Kuwayama, a PDN‘s 30 photographer in 2000, is the co-founder of Lightstalkers.org, the online forum for photojournalists. In 2010 he launched Basetrack, a project that used social media sites, including Facebook, to share information about a battalion of Marines deployed to Afghanistan with whom Kuwayama and other photographers were embedded. Basetrack was funded with a Knight Foundation News Challenge grant.

Kuwayama told PDN, “I’m inventing the position as we speak.”

Related articles

Facebook Makes Alarming Changes to Terms, ASMP Breaks Down the Changes

Experiment in Multimedia: Q&A with Teru Kuwayama on Basetrack (for PDN subscribers)

November 26th, 2013

Updated: Tragic Story of Former Photoj Inspires Upswell of Support on FB

Yesterday photojournalist Benjamin Lowy posted a photograph on Instagram and Facebook of a man he identified as a former photojournalist, who through a series of tragic circumstances found himself living on the street. Lowy shared his image of the man, named Scott Sutton, and recounted the conversation he and Sutton had on the street near Union Square in New York City. After Lowy told Sutton that he is a photojournalist, “the conversation took a turn to the surreal,” Lowy wrote.

Sutton told Lowy that he had once been a photojournalist as well. According to Lowy, Sutton told him he’d lost everyone close to him, including his wife, who passed away, and has been on the street for two years.

Many in and out of the photo community have shared the story and posted nearly 100 comments on Facebook. Several people have said they know Sutton and have offered to help him. “Very difficult to see him this way but any of us could easily find ourselves in the same spot,” wrote Patrick Whalen, a Wall Street Journal photo editor who said he worked with Sutton in the 90s.

As of this afternoon, Lowy wrote an update saying that since the post yesterday, “quite a few of his friends have contacted me from RIT – where he did his PJ grad schooling, and Archive Photos – where he was a darkroom tech in the 90′s. Currently we are all trying to figure out how to best help him, and I’ll be going back out today to try and find him.”

Lowy’s image and story are here, on his Facebook page.

Update: A previous version of this article stated that Sutton had worked as a photojournalist for Getty Images. A Getty representative told PDNPulse via email that Sutton never worked as a Getty Images photographer.

November 19th, 2013

ICP Appoints Mark Lubell New Executive Director

The board of trustees of the International Center of Photography (ICP) has named Mark Lubell to be its new executive director. He replaces Mark Robbins, who left the job as director of the museum and school after 19 months to become President and CEO of the American Academy in Rome.

Lubell was Director of Magnum Photos from 2004 until 2011. During his tenure, he negotiated the sale of the Magnum press print archive to Michael Dell and his investment firm, MSD Capital, and its placement at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas. In 2008, he lead the “Access to Life Project,” in which eight Magnum photographers documented the work of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and also lead initiatives to bring new revenue to the photo agency. Since leaving Magnum, he has been working as a consultant.

In a joint statement announcing Lubell’s appointment, Caryl S. Englander, board chair, and Jeffrey A. Rosen, board president, said, “Mark’s deep experience with photography, his aptitude with digital technology, and his managerial skills qualify him especially well to lead ICP forward, as we prepare to celebrate our 40th anniversary in 2014. Mark is a forward thinker whose vision of ICP’s central role in photography in the digital age builds on the spirit of our founder, Cornell Capa.” ICP has had three previous executive directors. Willis “Buzz” Hartshorn, who succeeded founder Cornell Capa in running the museum and school, stepped down in 2012 for health reasons.

Related article

ICP Executive Director Leaves After 19 Months

ICP Director Hartshorn to Step Down