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March 13th, 2014

Calumet Photographic to Liquidate, Closes US Stores

calumet-FBCalumet Photographic, the 75-year-old camera supply and rental company, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the Chicago Tribune reports.

This morning, Calumet announced on its Facebook page that it had closed all its stores in the US, though its stores in Europe remain in business.  Calls to Calumet stores in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles were not returned, and the company’s website is down.

Calumet’s bankruptcy filing lists 585 creditors, including photo manufacturers such as Canon, Fuji, Manfrotto, Phase One, Hasselblad, Cambo, Mac Group and many others.

PDN will continue to follow this story.

March 10th, 2014

Commercial Drones Are Legal, Federal Court Says

A federal administrative court judge has determined that drones–aka unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs–can be used for commercial purposes because the Federal Aviation Administration has no regulations on the books that prohibit such uses.

Vice.com reported that the judge made the ruling last week in a case involving a photographer who had appealed a $10,000 fine for using a drone to shoot a video commercial, allegedly in violation of FAA rules.

The FAA immediately appealed, explaining in a statement that it “is concerned that this decision could impact the safe operation of the national airspace system and the safety of people and property on the ground.”

The FAA had fined photographer Raphael Pirker for unauthorized commercial use of a drone in 2011, after Pirker had used a remotely-controlled aircraft to produce a video commercial for the University of Virginia. Pirker had piloted the aircraft in the vicinity of the university, located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Pirker, owner of UAV video production company Team Black Sheep, won his appeal of the fine on the grounds that a drone is in the same class of aircraft as model airplanes, which the FAA has never regulated. (The FAA has asked model airplane operators to fly the planes under 400 feet, and to stay away from airports, but those rules are strictly voluntary.)

The administrative court ruling means that photographers can use drones for commercial purposes, at least for now. But with the FAA opposed to unregulated use of drone aircraft in the US, it’s a safe bet that the agency will try to impose new administrative rules–or seek legislation–to restrict the use of drones in the near future.

Related:
Hartford Police Sued for Stopping Camera Drone, Chasing Photog Away

March 6th, 2014

Getty’s Craig Peters on Why Free Images Are Good for Photographers, And for the Photo Industry

Following the announcement by Getty Images that the agency would be allowing non-commercial uses of its images free of charge, we interviewed Craig Peters, Senior Vice President of Business Development, Marketing at Content Images at Getty, to try and find out what the agency hopes to gain from this extraordinary decision.

As we reported today on PDNOnline,  Getty has released a new embed tool to make it easy for non-commercial users to share images from Getty on websites, blogs and social media channels. The new tool enables Getty to collect data on those users and and push ads through the embed viewer. We asked Peters how ad revenue will be shared, what this new business model means for the perceived value of images, and whether Getty is changing its position on enforcing copyrights on images.

(We used the image above for free, using Getty’s Embed tool)

PDN: Getty has various collections, from different sources. What images are excluded from this free usage initiative?
Craig Peters: It’s hard to give you a specific answer. The vast majority of images are in, [unless] we have restrictions from the photographer or copyright owner.

PDN: Are news and celebrity images available as soon as Getty uploads them?
CP: They’re made available as soon as they’re uploaded.

PDN: Why is Getty giving up on the idea of charging everyone–even small non-commercial users– for use of images? (more…)

March 6th, 2014

Getty’s Free Image Program: New Revenue Model, or a Surrender to Copyright Infringement?

Getty Images lit up the Twittersphere today with an announcement that it was making its archive available free of charge for bloggers and other non-commercial users. Some of the big questions are: What is Getty gaining by making images free to the public? How does Getty’s decision affect not only its own contributors, but all photographers? And are there any hidden costs to non-commercial users who take advantage of Getty’s free images?

Getty said in its announcement that it was releasing a new embed tool to make it easy for non-commercial users to share its images on websites, blogs and social media channels.

Getty CEO Jonathan Klein says in the announcement that the “easy, legal sharing…benefits our content contributors and partners.”

One benefit to the company and its partners is that by automatically crediting the images and linking them back to Getty’s website, the embed tool makes it easy to find and license the images for commercial use.

At the same time, the embed tool will also makes it easier for Getty to track non-commercial uses of its images, and the users who take advantage of the company’s offer of free images.

To read what Getty’s terms of service allow it to do with users’ information, and more on the implications of this new business for the perceived value of all images, see our news story, now on PDNOnline.

Related Articles

Getty’s Free Image Program
ASMP To Getty Photographers: Time to Bail

March 4th, 2014

Trunk Archive Acquires North American Licensing Rights for Magnum Photos

Image licensing company Trunk Archive announced today that it has acquired North American licensing rights to the image library of Magnum Photos.

Statements from both Magnum and Trunk focused on the possibilities for Trunk to do a better job generating revenue from the archive than Magnum has.

In a statement, Magnum CEO Giorgio Psacharopulo said the agency is “confident that this partnership will allow Magnum’s iconic imagery to reach a new audience of creative professionals. There exist many hidden gems within the Magnum collection and we anticipate that these will be rediscovered through our association with Trunk Archive.”

Trunk Archive CEO Matthew Moneypenny said his company is “proud to be representing this prestigious collection and very excited to find new licensing opportunities for these exceptional images.”

The news comes just a few days after Trunk announced its acquisition of rep firm Bernstein & Andriulli, and Gallery Stock, its sister company.

Trunk Archive represents more than 250 photographers around the world for secondary image sales. Founded seven years ago by Moneypenny, a former Art + Commerce image licensing agent, it has offices in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Sidney, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai.

Related: Trunk Archive Buys Bernstein & Andriulli, Gallery Stock
(Re)Sales Opportunities: A variety of creative licensing opportunities exist for photographers interested in capitalizing on their existing imagery. (subscription required)

February 19th, 2014

Trunk Archive Buys Bernstein & Andriulli, Gallery Stock

Image licensing agency Trunk Archive has acquired Bernstein & Andriulli (B&A), the photographers’ rep firm, and its sister company Gallery Stock, Bernstein & Andriulli announced today.

Howard Bernstein said in a prepared statement that Trunk Archive’s image collection and service capabilities “make [Trunk Archive] the perfect partner for future growth and offers many strategic opportunities to our artists.”

B&A represents about 45 photographers. The firm also represents illustrators, directors, hair and makeup artists and stylists. Gallery Stock represents about 120 commercial, fine-art and editorial photographers for secondary sales of their images.

B&A and Gallery Stock will continue to operate under Bernstein’s direction, and retain their brand identities, according to the announcement.

Trunk Archive CEO Matthew Moneypenny said in the statement that the combined companies will give clients “unprecedented access to the world’s most creative and thought-provoking imagery,” but he provided no specifics.

Trunk Archive represents more than 250 photographers around the world for secondary image sales. Founded seven years ago by Moneypenny, a former Art + Commerce image licensing agent, It has offices in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Sidney, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai.

Related:
(Re)Sales Opportunities (subscription required)

February 17th, 2014

Kodak Alaris Hires New CEO from Motorola Mobility

Kodak Alaris, the personal and document imaging company now owned by the UK Pension Plan (KPP), named Ralf Gerbershagen its new Chief Executive Officer on Friday. Gerbershagen was previously at Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google, where he had held positions as Managing Director Motorola Germany GmbH and VP & General Manager Motorola Mobility Europe and had responsibility for several product portfolios such as Network Infrastructure equipment, Smartphones and Accessories. Gerbershagen’s appointment takes effect April 1, 2014.

Eastman Kodak announced in April 2013 that it was transferring its Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging businesses to its UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP). The transfer settled the $2.8 billion that KPP claimed against Eastman Kodak during the former film giant’s bankruptcy proceedings. In September, the deal was completed and the company announced its new name, Kodak Alaris.

Kodak Alaris’s Personalized Imaging business includes the manufacture and sale of film products and photographic paper, as well as its business in retail photo kiosks and dry lab systems, and digital souvenir photography services at theme parks, resorts and other destinations.

Gerbershagen will be based in the UK and report to Steven Ross, Interim Chairman of the Board of Kodak Alaris.

Related Articles
Kodak Turns Over Film Division to Its UK Pension Plan

Kodak To Emerge from Bankruptcy in Early September

Kodak Files for Bankruptcy Protection

December 5th, 2013

Barter, Creative Collaboration Pay Off for Photog Mark Mann and Custom Tailor Lord Willy’s

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men's custom tailor Lord Willy's, with art direction and styling by the brand's co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It's also his head on the wall.

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men’s custom tailor Lord Willy’s, with art direction and styling by the brand’s co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It’s also his head on the wall.

“It’s such a joy to work with an art director who’s also the client,” says Mark Mann, the photographer behind a series of images currently gracing the walls and website of Lord Willy’s, a men’s custom tailor in New York’s Nolita neighborhood. (more…)

November 26th, 2013

Job Rankings Claim Dishwasher a Better Job than Photojournalist

Career-building website CareerCast.com has ranked the top 200 jobs, and “Photographer” and “Photojournalist” were ranked 172 and 188 respectively.

According to the study, which factors in “physical demands, work environment, income, stress, and hiring outlook,” noted the Wall Street Journal, photojournalist ranks just above “corrections officer” and just below “dishwasher.”

Photographers fare slightly better than photojournalists in the rankings, sandwiched between “Construction Worker” and “Seamstress/Tailor.”

“Newspaper reporter” was the worst of the 200 jobs ranked by the survey.

Read the full list of rankings over at the Wall Street Journal, but we advise you take them with a grain of salt and have a good laugh.

Related: Newspaper Job Cuts Hit Photographers Hardest, Pew Research Says

November 18th, 2013

Pro Tips for Photographers with Jake Stangel

Colleagues know San Francisco-based photographer Jake Stangel as a person who is open with information, advice and encouragement for his peers and aspiring shooters.

Occasionally over the past few years Stangel has answered questions and offered “Pro Tips” on his Tumblr to younger photographers who are wondering how to go about building a career in today’s market.

Stangel gave us permission to reprint a couple of our favorite of these pieces on PDNPulse, and has also agreed to field questions from PDN readers for some new installments of his “Pro Tips” columns.

To submit a question for Jake please send an email to editor@pdnonline.com with the subject line “Pro Tips.”

On When to Work With a Rep and When to Just Work Harder

Question: So I’ve worked with some editors and worked for some companies doing small time shoots and small editorial things. My relationship with editors/publications is kind of going much too slow and I don’t feel confident in sending them promo or emailing them and expecting results. Would it be appropriate to find an agent? I feel confident in my work and abilities but I’m wondering if ever there’s a time to search for representation, would it be now?

What exactly should I be looking for with representation? And what should I be prepared to send them?

Answer: By and large, the appropriate time to search for representation is when you literally can no longer manage shooting and client requests and calendars and making estimates and negotiating various licenses and shoot deliverables all at once.

The other time an agent is helpful is if you’re extraordinarily talented but a recluse, and want someone to be your “face” and leave it up to you to just make photographs. But the key thing here is that you need to be extraordinarily talented. Extraordinarily. Talented. (more…)