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March 4th, 2014

Trunk Archive Acquires North American Licensing Rights for Magnum Photos

Image licensing company Trunk Archive announced today that it has acquired North American licensing rights to the image library of Magnum Photos.

Statements from both Magnum and Trunk focused on the possibilities for Trunk to do a better job generating revenue from the archive than Magnum has.

In a statement, Magnum CEO Giorgio Psacharopulo said the agency is “confident that this partnership will allow Magnum’s iconic imagery to reach a new audience of creative professionals. There exist many hidden gems within the Magnum collection and we anticipate that these will be rediscovered through our association with Trunk Archive.”

Trunk Archive CEO Matthew Moneypenny said his company is “proud to be representing this prestigious collection and very excited to find new licensing opportunities for these exceptional images.”

The news comes just a few days after Trunk announced its acquisition of rep firm Bernstein & Andriulli, and Gallery Stock, its sister company.

Trunk Archive represents more than 250 photographers around the world for secondary image sales. Founded seven years ago by Moneypenny, a former Art + Commerce image licensing agent, it has offices in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Sidney, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai.

Related: Trunk Archive Buys Bernstein & Andriulli, Gallery Stock
(Re)Sales Opportunities: A variety of creative licensing opportunities exist for photographers interested in capitalizing on their existing imagery. (subscription required)

February 19th, 2014

Trunk Archive Buys Bernstein & Andriulli, Gallery Stock

Image licensing agency Trunk Archive has acquired Bernstein & Andriulli (B&A), the photographers’ rep firm, and its sister company Gallery Stock, Bernstein & Andriulli announced today.

Howard Bernstein said in a prepared statement that Trunk Archive’s image collection and service capabilities “make [Trunk Archive] the perfect partner for future growth and offers many strategic opportunities to our artists.”

B&A represents about 45 photographers. The firm also represents illustrators, directors, hair and makeup artists and stylists. Gallery Stock represents about 120 commercial, fine-art and editorial photographers for secondary sales of their images.

B&A and Gallery Stock will continue to operate under Bernstein’s direction, and retain their brand identities, according to the announcement.

Trunk Archive CEO Matthew Moneypenny said in the statement that the combined companies will give clients “unprecedented access to the world’s most creative and thought-provoking imagery,” but he provided no specifics.

Trunk Archive represents more than 250 photographers around the world for secondary image sales. Founded seven years ago by Moneypenny, a former Art + Commerce image licensing agent, It has offices in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Sidney, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai.

Related:
(Re)Sales Opportunities (subscription required)

February 17th, 2014

Kodak Alaris Hires New CEO from Motorola Mobility

Kodak Alaris, the personal and document imaging company now owned by the UK Pension Plan (KPP), named Ralf Gerbershagen its new Chief Executive Officer on Friday. Gerbershagen was previously at Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google, where he had held positions as Managing Director Motorola Germany GmbH and VP & General Manager Motorola Mobility Europe and had responsibility for several product portfolios such as Network Infrastructure equipment, Smartphones and Accessories. Gerbershagen’s appointment takes effect April 1, 2014.

Eastman Kodak announced in April 2013 that it was transferring its Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging businesses to its UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP). The transfer settled the $2.8 billion that KPP claimed against Eastman Kodak during the former film giant’s bankruptcy proceedings. In September, the deal was completed and the company announced its new name, Kodak Alaris.

Kodak Alaris’s Personalized Imaging business includes the manufacture and sale of film products and photographic paper, as well as its business in retail photo kiosks and dry lab systems, and digital souvenir photography services at theme parks, resorts and other destinations.

Gerbershagen will be based in the UK and report to Steven Ross, Interim Chairman of the Board of Kodak Alaris.

Related Articles
Kodak Turns Over Film Division to Its UK Pension Plan

Kodak To Emerge from Bankruptcy in Early September

Kodak Files for Bankruptcy Protection

December 5th, 2013

Barter, Creative Collaboration Pay Off for Photog Mark Mann and Custom Tailor Lord Willy’s

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men's custom tailor Lord Willy's, with art direction and styling by the brand's co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It's also his head on the wall.

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men’s custom tailor Lord Willy’s, with art direction and styling by the brand’s co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It’s also his head on the wall.

“It’s such a joy to work with an art director who’s also the client,” says Mark Mann, the photographer behind a series of images currently gracing the walls and website of Lord Willy’s, a men’s custom tailor in New York’s Nolita neighborhood. (more…)

November 26th, 2013

Job Rankings Claim Dishwasher a Better Job than Photojournalist

Career-building website CareerCast.com has ranked the top 200 jobs, and “Photographer” and “Photojournalist” were ranked 172 and 188 respectively.

According to the study, which factors in “physical demands, work environment, income, stress, and hiring outlook,” noted the Wall Street Journal, photojournalist ranks just above “corrections officer” and just below “dishwasher.”

Photographers fare slightly better than photojournalists in the rankings, sandwiched between “Construction Worker” and “Seamstress/Tailor.”

“Newspaper reporter” was the worst of the 200 jobs ranked by the survey.

Read the full list of rankings over at the Wall Street Journal, but we advise you take them with a grain of salt and have a good laugh.

Related: Newspaper Job Cuts Hit Photographers Hardest, Pew Research Says

November 18th, 2013

Pro Tips for Photographers with Jake Stangel

Colleagues know San Francisco-based photographer Jake Stangel as a person who is open with information, advice and encouragement for his peers and aspiring shooters.

Occasionally over the past few years Stangel has answered questions and offered “Pro Tips” on his Tumblr to younger photographers who are wondering how to go about building a career in today’s market.

Stangel gave us permission to reprint a couple of our favorite of these pieces on PDNPulse, and has also agreed to field questions from PDN readers for some new installments of his “Pro Tips” columns.

To submit a question for Jake please send an email to editor@pdnonline.com with the subject line “Pro Tips.”

On When to Work With a Rep and When to Just Work Harder

Question: So I’ve worked with some editors and worked for some companies doing small time shoots and small editorial things. My relationship with editors/publications is kind of going much too slow and I don’t feel confident in sending them promo or emailing them and expecting results. Would it be appropriate to find an agent? I feel confident in my work and abilities but I’m wondering if ever there’s a time to search for representation, would it be now?

What exactly should I be looking for with representation? And what should I be prepared to send them?

Answer: By and large, the appropriate time to search for representation is when you literally can no longer manage shooting and client requests and calendars and making estimates and negotiating various licenses and shoot deliverables all at once.

The other time an agent is helpful is if you’re extraordinarily talented but a recluse, and want someone to be your “face” and leave it up to you to just make photographs. But the key thing here is that you need to be extraordinarily talented. Extraordinarily. Talented. (more…)

November 12th, 2013

Newspaper Job Cuts Hit Photographers Hardest, Pew Research Says

In an article published yesterday by the Pew Research Center, writer Monica Anderson noted that photographers and other visual journalists have borne the brunt of newspaper layoffs from 2000-2012.

Basing her findings on newsroom census data released by the American Society of News Editors, Anderson wrote that “The ranks of photographers, artists and videographers have been trimmed by nearly half (43%)—from 6,171 in 2000 to 3,493 in 2012.” By comparison, the number of full-time writers and reporters fell only 32%, and editor and producer jobs by only 27%.

Related: Chicago Sun-Times Eliminates Photo Staff

Via Poynter

October 29th, 2013

PDN Video: Gregory Heisler on How Clients Really Decide Which Photographer to Hire

In this final clip from our video interview with portrait master Gregory Heisler, he tells the secret to getting hired by clients. Hint: it has far less to do with your portfolio than you might think.

Heisler recently released 50 Portraits, his first book, which is a retrospective of his career, as well as a rich tutorial in the art and craft of portraiture. Check out the excerpt of the book in this month’s issue of PDN, and also the three previous video clips featuring Heisler’s tips on lighting, relating to subjects, and other topics.

Gregory Heisler on How Photographers Get Hired from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

Related:

Gregory Heisler Shares the Techniques That Go Into His Portraiture
PDN Video: Gregory Hesiler on How to Relate to Portrait Subjects (Even If You Are Shy and Bumbling)
PDN Video: Gregory Heisler on His New Book and Best Portraits
PDN Video Pick: Gregory Heisler’s Tips on Lighting Portraits
How Top Photographers Shoot Great Portraits
PDN Video Pick: Miller Mobley’s Tips for Landing Clients

October 4th, 2013

If We Spend $25K On A Photo Essay, Readers Should Pay to See It, Says Harper’s Publisher

Harper’s publisher John R. MacArthur wrote a letter for the October issue of the magazine in which he took a strong stand against publishing free writing and photography on the web. He tackles the question of how journalism should be funded and distributed today, arguing that publishers, readers and journalists should reject the idea that good journalism should be given away for free in hopes of gaining page views. When he talks about good journalism, he includes good photography. (We’ve noted previously that Harper’s has become a great publisher of photography, winning National Magazine awards and other accolades.)

MacArthur says he has been distressed in recent years as publishers give away the work done by journalists and editors “in the quest for more advertising. Instead of honoring the reader, writer, and editor, this new approach to the publishing business instead insulted them,” MacArthur writes, “both by devaluing their work and by feeding it—with little or no remuneration—to search engines, which in turn feed information to advertising agencies (and, as it turns out, the government.)”

MacArthur says advocates of free content are peddling “nonsense.” “Who needs fact-checkers when we have crowdsourcing to correct the record? Why doesn’t Harper’s give away a particularly good investigative piece… so more people will read it?”

He also has the temerity to suggest that publishers, journalists and editors “have to earn a living.” He singles out a recent photo essay by an anonymous photographer, who risked arrest and imprisonment to report from inside Iran. The assignment cost the magazine $25,000, MacArthur says. “Shouldn’t Anonymous be paid for this courage and skill?” MacArthur asks. “Shouldn’t Harper’s be compensated for sending Anonymous into the field?”

“It is unreasonable to expect that an advertiser would directly sponsor such daring photography,” MacArthur writes. “It is wishful thinking to believe that parasitic Google, now bloated with billions of dollars’ worth of what I consider pirated property, will ever willingly pay Harper’s, or Anonymous, anything at all for the right to distribute Anonymous’s pictures…”

MacArthur will hopefully forgive us for quoting him at length on our blog, which is not behind a paywall. Those who want to read the rest of his statement, and see Michael Christopher Brown‘s fantastic photographs from Libya, or Misty Keasler‘s touching images accompanying a report about a controversial Montana orphanage for Russian children, will have to pick up the magazine on the newsstand, or subscribe for $20, about twice what I will probably spend on lunch today.

September 12th, 2013

Are Women Photographers Being Discriminated Against in the Editorial Market?

A week ago editorial photographer and artist Daniel Shea published a post on his Tumblr, titled “On Sexism in Editorial Photography,” hoping it would “initiate a broader conversation.” Shea began the post with the disclaimer that he is “a white, cis male photographer” who didn’t claim to speak for anyone but himself, before pointing out that, to him, “It would seem that the biggest magazines with the most hiring power hire mostly male photographers.”

The post has generated nearly 550 likes and reblogs on Tumblr, as well as a number of comments.

Without naming names, Shea cites informal conversations with photo editors who offered some interesting explanations as to why a gender imbalance might exist. Some editors said they didn’t know women photographers whose esthetic fit with their magazines. “To further complicate this issue,” Shea continues, “one editor mentioned that most media, art and literature is made to fit a masculine perspective, and perhaps that’s why men are more ‘apt’ at photographing that content.”

Shea notes also that most photo editors are women; one editor floated the idea that women are “natural nurturers” of men. Shea says he’s “skeptical” of that explanation. Instead, he suggests other reasons. One is that sexism in editorial photography is a microcosm. “Larger systems of oppression, like sexism and misogyny, replicate themselves very effectively on smaller scales,” Shea wrote. (more…)