You are currently browsing the archives for the awards category.

April 30th, 2013

Paul Salveson Wins 2013 First Book Award

© Paul Salveson, courtesy MACK / www.mackbooks.co.uk

© Paul Salveson, courtesy MACK / www.mackbooks.co.uk

American photographer Paul Salveson has won the 2013 First Book Award for his project “Between the Shell,” a series of color images made through creative observation and arrangement of objects close at hand. The award, announced last week, is co-administered by MACK books and Britain’s National Media Museum. They will publish Salveson’s book later this year.

The judges for the award were Michael Mack (MACK), Polly Fleury (Wilson Centre for Photography London), Liz Jobey (FT Weekend Magazine), Greg Hobson (National Media Museum) and photographer Clare Strand.

Salveson’s work was selected from more than 100 submissions.

The First Book Award, now in its second year, is open to photographers who have not previously released a book project with a publisher. However self-published and print-on-demand projects do not disqualify a photographer.

In order to be considered for the award, photographers must be nominated by one of an international group of nominators. The names of this year’s nominators were not released.

April 24th, 2013

Fabio Bucciarelli Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

©Fabio Bucciarelli

©Fabio Bucciarelli

Fabio Bucciarelli, who has covered the civil war in Syria for Agence France-Presse, has won the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, the Overseas Press Club (OPC) has announced. Bucciarelli won the award for a portfolio of images titled “Battle to Death,” showing Free Syrian Army soldiers battling intensely against government forces in the streets of Aleppo.

In announcing the award, OPC said, “The images from this portfolio put you ‘in the moment’ and have a palatable sense of urgency. There is a consistency to the images that helps the viewer identify with the subjects and the perils they are encountering.”

The award, given annually by the OPC, recognizes photographers who have shown exceptional enterprise and courage while covering world news events.

In other OPC award categories, freelance photographer Samuel James won the Olivier Rebbot Award for  best photographic reporting from abroad in magazines and books. James won for “The Water of My Land,” a story about oil production and its consequence in the Niger Delta. The story was published in Harper’s magazine.

Bernat Armangue of The Associated Press won the OPC’s John Faber Award for feature photography. Armangue won for his portfolio of images about the conflict in Gaza.

Oded Balilty, also of The Associated Press, also won a feature photography award for his story about an ultra-orthodox wedding near Tel Aviv.

An awards ceremony will be held tonight in New York City. A complete list of award recipients is available on the OPC Web site.

April 3rd, 2013

2013 Grants and Awards Announced by CENTER

"Son magnifique champ de fleurs," from "Gaijin," © David Favrod. Courtesy CENTER.

“Son magnifique champ de fleurs,” from “Gaijin,” © David Favrod. Courtesy CENTER.

CENTER, the Santa Fe nonprofit whose mission is to aid photographers and promote their work, has announced the winners of two grants and a series of awards.

The Project Launch Grant, which aids a photographer in completing and disseminating a fine-art or documentary project and carries an award of $10,000, was given to David Favrod for his series “Gaijin.” The work explores the displacement Favrod experiences as a result of feeling he belongs neither where he grew up, in Switzerland, nor where he was born, in Japan. The grant was judged by Library of Congress Curator Verna Curtis, COLORS Magazine Photo Editor Mauro Bedoni, and Pier 24 exhibition space Director Christopher McCall.

The Project Development Grant, which supports a photographer’s work-in-progress with an award of $5,000, went to Ignacio Evangelista for his project “After Schengen,” a series of landscapes of disused border checkpoints in Europe. The grant was judged by Denise Wolff, Aperture books program senior editor.

CENTER received more than 1000 entries for the grants from photographers around the world, the organization said in a statement.

CENTER’s Choice Awards give a curator, editor and gallerist an opportunity to recognize the work of photographers with exhibition, publication and portfolio review opportunities, among other prizes. (The winners of the two grants mentioned above are also offered exhibition, publication and portfolio review opportunities.)

For the Curator’s Choice Award, curator Tina Schelhorn of the Kolga Tblisi Photo organization recognized Marc Asnin for his long-term project about his drug-addicted uncle. For the Editor’s Choice Award, Vanity Fair Photography Director Susan White recognized Jennifer McClure for her series about her personal struggle for meaning. For the Gallerist’s Award, Pace/McGill Gallery Director Lauren Panzo recognized Bryan Schutmaat for his documentary series on old mining towns in the American West.

The winning work was selected from submissions that totaled 6,000 images, and which came from 43 countries, CENTER said.

For galleries of work by the winners and runners up visit the CENTER site here.

March 26th, 2013

Short Poverty Film Wins Top Multimedia Prize at BOP Competition

Photographer and director Alan Spearman of the Memphis Commercial Appeal has won the Best Use of Multimedia prize at the NPPA Best of Photojournalism contest, judges announced yesterday.

Spearman won the prize for his short film called As I Am, a rich, poetic film about the hard edges of poverty, from the viewpoint of an insider struggling to pull himself out. Spearman entered the film in the NPPA contest under the title, “Memphis Poverty: What Obama Didn’t See.”

The subject of the film, Christopher Dean, had a moment in the YouTube spotlight in 2011 for his charming introduction of Barack Obama at a high school graduation, where Obama spoke.  Community leaders in Memphis rallied around Dean afterwards to help him pay for college. During the summer of 2012, Dean was an intern at the Memphis Commercial Appeal, where he worked with Spearman on the “As I Am” film.

“Memphis Poverty masterfully tells an important American story in a non-traditional way, bypassing the literal translation of poverty to strike the soul,” Best of Photojournalism jurors said in an announcement posted on the NPPA web site. “The artful blend of documentary moments, poetry, music, cinematic shooting and editing craftsmanship moves our art of storytelling forward in a dramatic way.”

The jury, which included Nancy Andrews, Zach Wise, and Jonathan Quilter, gave special recognition to “Dying for Relief,” a multimedia story about the overuse and abuse of prescription drugs, produced by Liz O. Baylen of the Los Angeles Times.

Spearman also won the first place prize in the Feature Multimedia category for the “As I Am” project. First place winners in other BOP multimedia categories included Albert Lee of the Los Angeles Times, who won both the Multimedia Package category and Visual Column/Recurring Series category for his photo and video blog called Framework; MediaStorm in the Documentary Multimedia story category for “A Shadow Remains” (an extension of Philip Toledano’s “Days with My Father” project); Chris Zuppa of the Tampa Bay Times in the New Multimedia/48 Hours category for  “RNC 2012, Inside and Out;” Misha Domozhilov for “Motoball Monsters” in the Sports Multimedia Story category;  and Reuters for “The Wider Image” in the Tablet/Mobile Delivery Project category.

Related:
Picture Story: A Guided Tour of Poverty in Memphis (PDN subscription required)

March 22nd, 2013

Upcoming Deadlines for Grants, Fellowships Up to $10,000

It’s officially spring. Deadlines for some big grants are approaching.

Inge Morath Award
Administered by the Magnum Foundation, the Inge Morath Award of $5,000 is given annually to a female photojournalist under the age of 30. The Award supports the completion of a long-term documentary project, and is juried by Magnum photographers and the director of the Inge Morath Foundation.
Deadline: April 30.
www.ingemorath.org/index.php/2013/01/the-inge-morath-award-2013-guidelines/

Getty Grants for Editorial Photography
Starting April 1, Getty will be accepting applications for its 2013 Grants for Editorial Photography. Five grants of $10,000 each will be awarded to photojournalists “pursuing projects of personal and journalistic significance.” Deadline: May 1.
imagery.gettyimages.com/getty_images_grants/overview.aspx

The Aaron Siskind Foundation
The Aaron Siskind Foundation offers grants of up to $10,000 each to individual photographers, selected by a panel of judges. The entry fee is $10.  Applications are open to US citizens and legal permanent residents 21 years of age and older, and there is no requirement regarding subject matter, genre or process, except that the work must involve photography (no video).  Deadline: May 24.
aaronsiskind.org/grant.html

W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography
Each year the W. Eugene Smith Fund awards a grant (in 2012, the award was $30,000) to a photographer whose past work and proposed project follow the tradition of W. Eugene Smith’s concerned photography and dedicated compassion. The board of trustees of the W. Eugene Smith Fund appoints a three-member jury to evaluate written proposals and photos. There is a $50 application fee. Deadine: End of May.
smithfund.org/eugene-smith-grant

March 8th, 2013

Joan Fontcuberta Wins $143,000 Hasselblad Prize

© Joan Fontcuberta.

© Joan Fontcuberta.

Catalan photographer Joan Fontcuberta has won the 2013 Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography. The award comes with a 110,000 Euro (approximately $143,000 US) prize, an exhibition at the Hasselblad Center at the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden in October and a new book of Fontcuberta’s work, to be published by Mack. The award was delivered at a ceremony in Barcelona on March 7.

In its citation accompanying the award, the Hasselblad Foundation commended Fontcuberta’s “30-year achievement of constantly investigating and questioning the photographic medium.” A prolific writer, curator and teacher, Fontcuberta has used photography to create witty fictions that playfully undermine the trustworthiness of photography.

The full story is now on PDNOnline.

* Photo: In his 1997 book Sputnik, Joan Fontcuberta cast himself as the ill-fated cosmonaut Ivan Istochnikov. 

Related Articles
Paul Graham Wins $150K Hasselblad Award

March 1st, 2013

Abir Abdullah, Sara Naomi Lewkowicz Win 2013 Alexia Foundation Grants

Workers line up unclaimed bodies of victims of on accidental fire in a mass funeral at a grave at Jurain in Dhaka, Bangladesh. ©Abir Abdullah

Workers line up unclaimed bodies of victims of on accidental fire in a mass funeral at a grave at Jurain in Dhaka, Bangladesh. ©Abir Abdullah

Abir Abdullah of Bangladesh has won the $15,000 professional award in the Alexia Foundation grant competition, organizers announced this morning.

Sara Naomi Lewkowicz won the Alexia Foundation Student Grant, which includes a full-tuition scholarship to study photojournalism at the Syracuse University London Program in Fall, 2013, plus a $1,000 grant.

Click here to read the full story.

 

February 27th, 2013

Tips for Applying for Fellowships and Competitions: Free Seminar

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund and the Aperture Foundation are sponsoring a panel discussion called, “Strategies for Photographers: Thoughts On How To Apply For Fellowships and Other Competitions,” to be held Monday, March 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the Aperture Foundation in New York City. The event will be free and open to the public.

The panelists, all former head jurors for the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography, will share their experiences judging grants and competitions, including the W. Eugene Smith Grant, World Press Photo, the Getty Images grants, PDN contests and others. The participants are David Friend of Vanity Fair, collector W.M. Hunt, Marcel Saba of Redux Pictures and Lauren Wendle of Photo District News.

The panel will follow the press conference announcing the call for entries to the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant. Entries for the competition are due by end of May.

For more information on the panel, or the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund Grant, visit the W. Eugene Smith Fund website.

Related Articles
Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Krisanne Johnson Wins 2011 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Proposal: Krisanne Johnson’s Coming of Age Story

February 27th, 2013

POYi Punts on Pellegrin Controversy

©Paolo Pellegrin

©Paolo Pellegrin

Pictures of the Year International organizers have finally weighed in on the controversy surrounding Paolo Pellegrin’s prize-winning contest entry. And they dodged the issue that is central to the debate: the legitimacy of one particular documentary-like image of a subject posing with a gun in a parking garage–at Pellegrin’s request. (The subject told PDN that the image “put him in a bad light.”)

Instead, POYi addresses only the less complicated issues about the sloppiness of Pellegrin’s captions for the story.

POYi’s statement about entry, posted in the POYi Winners Gallery below Pellegrin’s story, reads as follows:

“The spirit of Pictures of the Year International is to honor photojournalists and celebrate their outstanding documentary photography. We do not probe for reasons to disqualify work. POY understands that errors may occur in captions submitted by photographers. We are happy to make corrections and acknowledge the errors. Story summaries and captions are ‘published’ when posted on the POY website. Any misunderstanding regarding self-authorship for ‘published’ captions or story summaries will be corrected by the photographer. POY affirms the awards.”

That response to the controversy is even more tepid than that of the organizers of World Press Photo, which at least addressed the guy-with-gun image directly when they issued their statement about it yesterday:

“The jury is of the opinion that although a more complete and accurate introduction and captions should have been made available by the photographer, the jury was not fundamentally mislead by the picture in the story or the caption that was included with it.”

Asked what safeguards they have in place to vet winning entries for manipulation, World Press Photo told PDN today that they reserve the right “to ask for raw files or untoned scans and consult an external photo expert to advise on possible manipulation. This analysis focuses only on technical facts.”

Rick Shaw, director of POYi, did not immediately respond to PDN’s request for an interview about the POYi statement.

But what the POYi and WPP statements about the Pellegrin entry suggest is that the photo contests are equipped by their rules to deal perfectly well with black and white issues, and less well-equipped to deal with any ethical gray areas.

It is, after all, easier to come up with guidelines about technical questions of how much image manipulation is too much, than it is to make rules about what kinds of actions on the part of a photographer might be misleading or damaging to the subject.

But until the contests are willing to take on such ethical gray areas when they arise, they’re leaving photographers a lot of room to “make things happen,” as long as it doesn’t happen in Photoshop, and as long as the captions pass a basic smell test.

Related:
World Press Hits Pellegrin with Wet Noodle (And Other Contest Scandals)

Paolo Pellegrin and His Subject at Odds Over Photograph