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April 22nd, 2014

Daniel Berehulak to Receive Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

© Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

© Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Photojournalist Daniel Berehulak has been chosen the winner of the Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award, the Chris Hondros Fund announced today. Berehulak, a photojournalist based in New Delhi, India, will receive a $20,000 prize to support his documentary work. Preston Gannaway, a US photographer, has been named a finalist for the award, and will receive a $5,000 prize.

The awards will be given on May 7, at a benefit for the Chris Hondros Fund to be held at Aperture Gallery in New York. The Chris Hondros Fund is a non-profit photojournalism organization founded in memory of photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed in a mortar attack while covering the conflict in Libya in April 2011. The Fund “advances the work of photojournalists who espouse [Chris Hondros's] legacy and vision, and sponsors fellowships, grant making and education to raise understanding of the issues facing reporters in conflict zones.”

Berehulak, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, the same agency that represented Hondros, said in a statement, “I had the pleasure of knowing Chris as a colleague and looked up to him as one would an older brother.”

Earlier this year, Berehulak was named Freelance Photographer of the Year at the Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition for a portfolio of work that included his story about malnutrition in Afghanistan, published in The New York Times.

Related articles
Tomas Munita, Bryan Denton to Receive Getty & Chris Hondros Fund Awards

Andrea Bruce Wins Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year

April 15th, 2014

Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award Announced

The International Women’s Media Foundation has announced the creation of the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, honoring the Associated Press photojournalist who was slain April 4 while covering preparations for the recent elections in Afghanistan.

IWMF, based in Washington, DC, says the award will be given annually “to a woman photojournalist whose work follows in the footsteps of Anja Niedringhaus.”

Details of the award, including its monetary value and when the first award will be given, are undetermined. “We’re bouncing around a lot of ideas,” including the possibility of giving it to more than one photojournalist a year, says IWMF spokesperson Anna Schiller. “We’re still working on the details.”

The award is being established with a $1 million endowment gift from the Howard G. Buffet Foundation, according to IWMF. Several years ago, the foundation provided funding for Niedringhaus to attend Harvard University as a 2007 Nieman Fellow.

“I considered Anja a friend who represented the best of photojournalism. By creating this award, we ensure her spirit lives on,” Howard Buffet said in a statement released with the IWMF announcement.

Niedringhaus and AP correspondent Kathy Gannon were traveling with a convoy of election workers who were delivering ballots in the town of Khost, near the border with Pakistan when they were shot by an Afghan police commander on April 4. Niedringhaus died immediately. Gannon is recovering from her injuries.

Niedringhaus started her career in 1990 as a staff photographer for European Press Photo Agency. She joined the AP in 2002, covering assignments throughout the Middle East as well as Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to the AP.

Recognized for covering war and its effects on local populations, she won the IWMF Courage in Journalism Award in 2005.

At her funeral on April 12 in the central German town of Hoexter, AP Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll said of the slain photographer: “She found the quiet human moments that connected people in great strife to all the rest of us around the world.”

Related:
AP Photographer Anja Niedringhaus Killed in Afghanistan

April 10th, 2014

11 Photographers Among Winners of 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced the recipients of their 2014 fellowships today. Eleven photographers are among the 178 recipients.

They are (links direct to their bios and image galleries on the Guggenheim site):

Robert Dawson
LaToya Frazier
Jason Fulford
Phyllis Galembo
Gregory Halpern
Brenda Kenneally
Andrew Moore
Lori Nix
Matthew Pillsbury
Mark Ruwedel
Rachel Sussman

Guggenheim Fellows receive a grant to pursue a project; the Foundation does not disclose the amount of money they receive.

Founded in 1922, the prestigious Fellowship program is intended to “add to the educational, literary, artistic, and scientific power of this country, and also to provide for the cause of better international understanding.” The Fellowship supports individuals in mid-career‚ “who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.”

Past recipients of Guggenheim Fellowships include photographers Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Lewis Baltz, Robert Adams, Brian Ulrich, Richard Mosse, Alec Soth, Christian Patterson and Penelope Umbrico.

Related: City Search: Gregory Halpern Explores the Rust Belt
Helping Communities Speak for Themselves: Upstate Girls
PDN Video Pick: LaToya Ruby Frazier at The Whitney Biennial

March 27th, 2014

Amy Elkins Wins 2014 Aperture Portfolio Prize

© Amy Elkins, "Four Years Out of a Death Row Sentence (Ocean), 2011," from "Black is the Day, Black is the Night."

© Amy Elkins, “Four Years Out of a Death Row Sentence (Ocean), 2011,” from “Black is the Day, Black is the Night.”

Photographer Amy Elkins has won the 2014 Aperture Portfolio Prize for two bodies of work exploring capital punishment. The Aperture Foundation announced the prize today.

For her series “Parting Words,” Elkins utilized the text of the last words of executed prisoners to reconstruct their mug shots and portraits. “These briefest of statements resonate with the micro-narratives of entire lives, tragic crimes, and opportunities and potential squandered,” writes Aperture Books Publisher Lesley A. Martin in a statement announcing Elkins’ award.

To create her second series on capital punishment, “Black is the Day, Black is the Night,” Elkins corresponded with death-row inmates and created images based on those conversations. In her series she combines these images with photographs of the physical letters, and with portraits of the inmates which she obscures digitally according to the amount of time the inmate has been incarcerated. “As viewers, we are invited to puzzle over an assortment of clues, including reenactments, exhibits submitted for our considerations, partial evidence, and statements both leading and misleading,” Martin writes.

The prize, which was judged by members of the Aperture staff and the organization’s work scholars, includes a $3,000 award and an exhibition at Aperture Gallery.

Elkins was chosen from a shortlist that included Matt Eich, Davide Monteleone, Max Pinckers and Sadie Wechsler. More than 1000 photographers submitted portfolios, Aperture said in a statement.

Previous winners of the Portfolio Prize have included Michael Corridore (2008), Alexander Gronsky (2009), David Favrod (2010), Sarah Palmer (2011), and Bryan Schutmaat (2013).

Related: Grays the Mountain Sends: A Photographic Study of American Mining Towns
Disputed Territories: Exploring Daily Life in the Northern Caucasus

March 26th, 2014

Tlumacki, Proctor Win Photojournalist of the Year Honors at BOP

John Tlumacki of The Boston Globe has won Photojournalist of the Year (Large Markets) at the 2013 Best of Photojournalism competition, while Sean Proctor of Michigan’s Midland Daily News has won Photojournalist of the Year (Small Markets).

The National Press Photographers’ Association, which sponsors the competition, announced the complete results on March 24.

Tlumacki won largely on the strength of his coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings in April, 2013. He was at the scene when the bombs exploded. “While others ran away,” NPPA said, “Tlumacki ran toward the scene.”

He spent months documenting the recovery of victims he photographed at the scene.

Proctor, meanwhile, is relatively new to photojournalism, having graduated from Central Michigan University in 2011. He held internships before joining the Midland Daily News just over a year ago, according to NPPA.

In other categories, Patrick Smith won Sports Photojournalist of the Year for the second year in a row. Last month, Smith was named 2014 POYi Sports Photographer of the Year by the Pictures of the Year International Competition.

Jim Gehrz of the Minneapolis Star Tribune won the Cliff Edom “New America” Award for a story about the oil boom in North Dakota and its impact on traditional life there.

Rick Loomis of the Los Angeles Times won the Returning Veterans Coming Home award.

NPPA has posted a complete list of winners on its web site. (Scroll way down.)

Judges for BOP’s still photography competition were photojournalists Cheryl Diaz Meyer and Bill Luster; Kenneth Irby of The Poynter Institute, and NPPA president Mark Dolan. The judging took place at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication.

March 13th, 2014

Chloe Dewe Mathews Named 2014 Gardner Fellow By Harvard’s Peabody Museum

From Chloe Dewe Mathews's series "Caspian." © Chloe Dewe Mathews

From Chloe Dewe Mathews’s series “Caspian.” © Chloe Dewe Mathews

British photographer Chloe Dewe Mathews was named the 2014 Robert Gardner Photography Fellow by Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, the museum announced earlier this week. The documentary photography fellowship provides a stipend of $50,000 to a photographer to work anywhere in the world on a book project about “the human condition.”

During her fellowship, Mathews, who is represented by Panos Pictures, will continue her series on the Caspian region, which she began in 2010 and which included her look at an Azerbaijani city, Naftalan, famous for petroleum-based therapeutic treatments. Mathews has returned several times to the region, with trips to Russia and a burning gas crater in Darvaza, Turkmenistan.

The fellowship was established by Robert Gardner, a documentary filmmaker and author, who studied at Harvard University, and was the director of the Film Study Center there from 1957–1997.

The fellowship is judged by a committee of four, whose identities were not disclosed by the museum. The museum seeks nominations from experts around the world.

Past fellowship winners include Guy Tillim (2007), Dayanita Signh (2008), Alessandra Sanguinetti (2009), Stephen Dupont (2010), Miki Kratsman (2011) and Yto Barrada (2013).

Related: Israeli Photographer Wins $50k Robert Gardner Fellowship for 2011
PDN’s 30 2012

March 7th, 2014

Eddie Adams Workshop, Smith Grant, Other Grants Accepting Applications

Earlier this week The Eddie Adams Workshop began accepting applications for its tuition-free, four-day photojournalism workshop in upstate New York. The Eddie Adams Workshop brings together top photography professionals and 100 students each year, and its alumni include many of the top photojournalists working today. Applications for the 2014 Workshop will be accepted through May 31. Students are selected based on the merit of their portfolios.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund is accepting applications through May 31 for the 2014 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography, which carries an award of $30,000. In addition, the jury will also give out an additional $5,000 in fellowships. There is a $50 fee to apply.

The nonprofit arts advocacy organization Crusade for Art is accepting proposals for its first-ever Engagement Grant, a $10,000 award given to a photographer or group of photographers who submit “the most innovative plan for increasing their audience and collector base.” There is a $20 fee to apply.

The Photographic Museum of Humanity, a digital photography museum, is awarding a grant of $4,000 for photographers. Applications are due March 12, and judges include Alec Soth and Diana Markosian. There is no fee to apply.

Related: Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Minnesota’s Artist Initiative Grants (PDN subscription required)
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Jon Lowenstein’s Guggenheim Fellowship (PDN subscription required)

March 5th, 2014

Scotiabank Announces 2014 Finalists for $50K Photography Prize

Rodney Graham, Mark Ruwedel, and Donald Weber have been named finalists for the 2014 Scotiabank Photography Award, the sponsor announced yesterday. The winner of the $50,000 prize will be announced April 29 in Toronto.

The award was established four years ago to honor the work of contemporary Canadian photographers. The 2014  nominees “have unique and distinctive bodies of work that show true excellence in Canadian contemporary photography,” says photographer Edward Burtynsky, chairperson of the award jury.

Graham, a conceptual artist, has created a varied body of work the comprises photography and media art installations that incorporate film, painting, literature, and music.

Ruwedel is a landscape photographer, working in both black and white and color. His latest book, called “Pictures of Hell” will be released this fall.

Weber, a documentary photographer, is “devoted to the study of how power deploys an all-compassing theatre for its subjects,” according to the Scotiabank announcement.

Nominations came from curators, photographers, artists, gallery directors, art critics, and academics from across Canada.  The finalists were selected by a three-member jury including Robert Bean, an artist, writer and photography professor; Catherine Bédard, art historian and Deputy-Director of the Canadian Cultural Centre; and  Ann Thomas, Curator, Photographs Collection, National Gallery of Canada.

In addition to the $50,000 cash prize, the winner of this year’s award will have a book of his work published by Steidl, and an exhibition at Ryerson Image Centre, Ryerson University, in Toronto.

Related:
State Power: Donald Weber’s Interrogations
PDN’s 30 2008: Donald Weber (subscription required)

February 26th, 2014

Brent McDonald Named 2014 POYi Multimedia Photographer of the Year

Video journalist Brent McDonald of The New York Times has won 2014 Multimedia Photographer of the Year at the Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers have announced. He won for a portfolio that included a video called “A Deadly Dance” about a surge of heroin use in Portland, Maine; and a story about Christine Quinn’s campaign for mayor of New York.

A Deadly Dance from The New York Times – Video on Vimeo.

Documentary Project of the Year honors went to NPR’s Planet Money team for a project called “Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.” The project also won first prize for Documentary Journalism (multimedia).

National Geographic won Best eBook (app) honors for “The Photography Issue, October 2013.”  The Best Website award went to Narratively.

Adam Panczuk won the Best Photography Book award for “Karczeby,” about the people of a region of east Poland with a strong cultural attachment to the land.

Contest organizers also announced on Monday that The New York Times won Best Newspaper honors, while National Geographic won for Best Magazine.

Judging for the competition, which began February 5, ended today. Various teams of jurors judged entries in five separate divisions: News, Sports, Reportage, Editing, and Multimedia. (Click links to see our stories on category winners in each division.)

Related:

Who’s Winning at POYi? PDN Links to First Place Entries in Editing and Multimedia Categories
Daniel Berehulak Named 2014 POYi Freelance Photographer of the Year
Barabara Davidson Named 2014 POYi Newspaper Photographer of the Year
Patrick Smith Named 2014 POYi Sports Photographer of the Year