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February 10th, 2015

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

©Cameron Spencer

©Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Photographer Cameron Spencer of Getty Images has been named Sports Photographer of the Year at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers announced today. His portfolio included a variety of dramatic sports action and feature images from a wide array of sporting events, including the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Runners up for the award were second place winner Al Bello of Getty Images and third place winner Patrick Smith.

In other sports categories, first prize for a Sports Action photo went to Al Bello of Getty Images for his dramatic shot of New York Giants receiver making a one-handed touchdown catch.

The winners of other sports categories are:

Sports Feature: Robert Sabo/Getty (1); Cameron Spencer/Getty (2); Ricky Carioti
Recreational Sports: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Sol Neelman (2); Austin Anthony/AP (3)
Sports Action: Al Bello/Getty (1); Alex Livesey/Getty (2); Joel Marklund
Winter Olympics: Lucas Jackson/Reuters (1); Joel Marklund (2); Ezra Shaw/Getty
Sports Picture Story: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Cristina Aldehuela (2); Yasuyoshi Chiba (3)

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Sports photo categories fall under the competition’s News Division. Judging of Reportage Division entries begins tomorrow.

Related:
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

February 10th, 2015

Funding Your Long-Term Photo Project—Upcoming Award and Fellowship Deadlines

Two awards and a pair of reporting fellowships are currently seeking applications.

The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is seeking applications for reporting fellowships on the topics of health/development and religion.

IRP says that the fellowship awards will include “roundtrip air tickets to and from [fellows'] homes and destinations, but all other travel must be arranged and paid by the fellow. IRP will offer a stipend based, in part, upon the budgets that all applicants must submit.”

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until the deadline on Monday, March 16. Applicants can be freelance or staffers. For more information visit the program website.

The 5,000 Euro (approx. $5656) Alfred Fried Photography Award is seeking photographs that answer the question, “What does peace look like?” All photojournalists may enter the Austria-based award competition free of charge. The entry deadline is May 17, 2015. Visit the Fried Award website for more information.

Last but not least, the New Orleans Photo Alliance is currently accepting applications for its annual Michael P. Smith Fund For Documentary Photography award of $5,000. The award is open to photographers based on the Gulf Coast of the United States—Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Emma Raynes, Director of Programs at the Magnum Foundation, is the judge for this year’s award. Applications require a fee of $25, and are due March 30, 2015. For more info visit the NOPA website.

February 6th, 2015

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

From "Last One Standing," a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

From “Last One Standing,” a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tennessee has won Newspaper Photographer of the Year honors at the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International competition. Vest’s portfolio stood out for its journalistic and esthetic quality, POYi organizers said in a statement released on Friday evening.

Runners-up for the award were Michael Robinson Chavez of the Los Angeles Times, who won second place; and Lisa Krantz of the San Antonio Express-News, who took third place.

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Judging for the News Division categories ends later today.

Winners of other News Division categories so far include Bulent Kilic, who won first place in the Spot News category for his dramatic photograph of an air strike against ISIS militants near the Turkish border; and Alexey Furman, first place winner in the Portrait category for his photograph of a woman who survived the shelling of her home in eastern Ukraine.

Philip Montgomery won first place in the Feature category for an image from the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, while Evgeniy Maloletka won top hones in the General News category for a graphic image from the scene of the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine last summer.

Organizers will officially announce the names of all winners after the judging is complete on February 20.

Winners PDN was able to identify of categories judged so far in the News Division include:

Feature: Philip Montgomery (1); Toni Greaves (2); Kevin Frayer (3)
General News: Evgeniy Maloletka (1); Andreas Bardell (2); unidentified* (3)
World Health: Pete Muller (1); unidentified* (2); John Moore (3)
Portrait: Alexey Furman (1); Philip Montgomery (2); Asa Sjöström (3)
Portrait Series: Victoria Will (1); Marcus Trappaud Bjørn (2); Pieter ten Hoopen (3)
Spot News: Bulent Kilic (1); Moises Saman (2); Anastasia Vlasova (3)
Human Conflict: William Daniels (1); Bulent Kilic (2); Andrey Stenin (3)
News Picture Story–Newspaper: unidentified* (1); Marcus Yam (2); Marcus Yam (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Lisa Krantz (2); unidentified (3)
Feature Picture Story–Newspaper: Stiller Ákos (1); Spencer Heaps (2); Mads Nissen (3)
Photographer of the Year–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Michael Robinson Chavez (2); Lisa Krantz (3)

Judging for sports category entries began over the weekend, and ends today (Monday). Reportage Division entries will be judged later this week, while Editing Division entries will be judged during the week of February 16.

*Readers: Please help us identify these winners.

January 14th, 2015

Nadia Sablin Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography

"Two-handed Saw." © Nadia Sablin

“Two-handed Saw.” © Nadia Sablin

Nadia Sablin has won the 2014 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography for her series on her aunts who live in northwest Russia. The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, which administers the prize with The Honickman Foundation, announced the award today. Sablin’s book will be published in November 2015 by CDS Books and Duke University Press.

The prize, which is awarded every two years, supports North American photographers who have never published a book-length work. Past winners have included Gerald H. Gaskin, Benjamin Lowy and Danny Wilcox Frazier.

Sablin, who is based in Brooklyn, New York, has been making color photographs documenting the lives of her aunts, Alevtina and Ludmila, for more than six years. Sablin says in her description of the project that  the women, who are in their seventies, “carry on the traditional Russian way of life, chopping wood for heating the house, bringing water from the well, planting potatoes and making their own clothes.”

Sandra S. Philips, curator of photography at the San Francisco Museum of Photography, was the judge for this year’s prize. Joshua Chuang, chief curator of the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, chaired the selection committee that chose the finalists for the prize. The finalists are: Victor Blue, Scott Dalton, Cate Dingley, Hannah Kozak, Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, Joseph Michael Lopez, Diana Markosian, Jeanine Michna-Bales, Chrystie Sherman, Jeffrey Stockbridge and Donna Wan. Their images will be featured on the first Book Prize blog this year.

Related Article
Project on African American and Latino Ballroom Subculture Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

December 3rd, 2014

Shortlist for Deutsche Börse $47,000 Prize Announced

© Nikolai Bakharev. Collection of the Moscow House of Photography Museum

© Nikolai Bakharev. Collection of the Moscow House of Photography Museum

The shortlist for the 2015 Deutsche Börse Prize was announced today.  The annual prize, which comes with 30,000 pound award (about $47,200 US), was established by The Photographers’ Gallery in London. It is given annually to a living photographer (or collaborative partners) to recognize a specific body of work in an exhibition or publication that has contributed significantly to photography in Europe.

The finalists are:
Nikolai Bakharev, nominated for his exhibition at the 55th Venice Biennale of images of bathers on public beaches in Russia, shot during the 1980s and 1990s.

Viviane Sassen, nominated for her exhibition “Umbra,” shown at Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam. The show combined Sassen’s abstract photos, drawings and light installations with poems by Maria Barnas.

Zanele Muholi, nominated for her book Faces and Phases 2006-2014 (Steidl), featuring her black-and-white portraits of members of the LGBT community in South Africa, accompanied by first-person testimonies.

Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, nominated for their book Ponte City (Steidl), about a 54-story apartment block in Johannesburg that has become a refuge for new immigrants to the city. The book, which includes 17 booklets, encompasses architectural plans, essays, personal accounts, and archival material.

The judges for this year’s prize are Chris Boot, Executive Director, Aperture Foundation; Rineke Dijkstra, photographer; Peter Gorschlüter, Deputy Director, MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt and Anne Marie Beckmann, curator of the Deutsche Börse art collection.

The winner will be announced in May 2015 at an award ceremony at The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

Related Articles
Richard Mosse Wins $50K Deutsche Borse Prize for The Enclave

Broomberg and Chanarin Win 2013 Deutsche Borse Prize

November 14th, 2014

Nicoló Degiorgis Wins $10k Paris Photo-Aperture First PhotoBook Award

Nicoló Degiorgis received the First PhotoBook prize from the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards, the Aperture Foundation announced today. The award, which is given for an outstanding first monograph, comes with a $10,000 prize. Degiorgis’s first book, Hidden Islam (Rorhof, 2014), depicts semi-permanent and makeshift Muslim places of worship in Italy and elsewhere in Europe.

The book is made entirely of gatefold pages. Black and white depictions of unassuming buildings like garages, shops and warehouses open to reveal color images of the interiors of these places of worship.

In other prize categories, Christopher Williams won Photography Catalogue of the Year honors for his exhibition catalogues Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness and Christopher Williams: Printed in Germany (Art Institute of Chicago, 2014).

PhotoBook of the Year went to Oliver Sieber for his book Imaginary Club (Editions GwinZegal and BöhnKobayashi, 2014), an assemblage of years of work depicting the places and people that define various music subcultures.

Vytautas V. Stanionis received a special mention for his book Photographs for Documents (Kaunas Photography Gallery). To create the book, Stanionis printed photographs from negatives his father shot as passport photos for residents in a small Lithuanian town who were applying for Soviet passports.

Judges for the awards were Alkazi Foundation for the Arts curator Rahaab Allana; MoMA chief photography curator Quentin Bajac; designer and director Cléo Charuet; curator Sebastian Hau; and gallerist and publisher Pierre Hourquet.

Via Aperture.

October 16th, 2014

LaToya Ruby Frazier Awarded United States Artists Fellowship

Photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier is among the 34 people named United States Artists fellows for 2014. The awards, announced on October 13, 2014, come with an unrestricted prize worth $50,000. The “United States Artists” (USA) program is described as investing in “the fundamental value artists contribute to American society.” The organization is funded by individuals and philanthropic groups such as the Bloomberg and Knight Foundations. This year, 16 women and 18 men were selected from among 116 nominated artists; awards were given in architecture and design, crafts and traditional arts, dance, literature, media, music, theater and visual arts.

Frazier, who was selected for PDN‘s 30 2012, released her first book, The Notion of Family, published by Aperture Foundation in September. In it, she tells the story of the racism and economic decline of small-town America through the lens of three generations of her family—herself, her mother, and her grandmother—in her hometown of Braddock, PA. In April 2014, she was awarded a  John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship. She has held academic and curatorial positions at Yale, Rutgers and Syracuse.

Since it was founded in 2006, the program has given $19.1 million to 405 artists. Past visual arts recipients who work in lens-based media include Luis Camnitzer, William Leavitt, Kerry Tribe and Lorraine O’Grady. A complete list of winners can be found at www.unitedstatesartists.org/2014fellows.

Related Articles

PDN’s 30 2012 – bio

Look3: A Defining Moment for LaToya Ruby Frazier

11 Photographers Among Winners of 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships

PDN Video Pick: LaToya Ruby Frazier at The Whitney Biennial

 

October 15th, 2014

2014 Eddie Adams Workshop Award Winners Announced

The annual four-day Eddie Adams Workshop for emerging photographers ended Monday with presentations by students and announcements of awards. Winners included:

Palestinian photojournalist Eman Mohammed, who received the $2,500 Chris Hondros Fund Award.

Zack Wittman, a junior at Central Michigan University, recipient of the Nikon Award, including a Nikon D4S camera, three NIKKOR zoom lenses and Speedlight flash, worth approximately $11,000.

Sean Proctor, a Michigan-based photojournalist, winner of the inaugural Bill Eppridge Memorial Award, a $1,000 cash prize. The prize was created this year in memory of the long-time LIFE photographer who died in October 2013 at age 75.

Rachel Woolf, a student at Ithaca College, who received the Colton Family Award for the student who best embodies the spirit of the workshop, including a $1,000 cash prize.

New York-based Nancy Borowick, recipient of a $1,000 grant from the visual storytelling app Storehouse for innovation in storytelling. (For more on Borowick’s work, see “Picture Story: Love in a Double Shadow of Cancer” on PDNOnline.)

Jonas Wresch, a German photographer based in Colombia, and Adriane Ohanesian, an American photographer based in Kenya, who each received a $1,000 cash award from National Geographic.

Numerous awards in the form of photo assignments and internships were given by the Associated Press, The Denver Post, Education Week, Getty Sports, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Sports Illustrated, Washington Post, a Lightbox feature on Time.com and a one-week internship at the White House.

The four-day, tuition-free workshop hosts 100 photo students and emerging pros with an international mix. Among the more than 20 workshop speakers and coaches at this year’s event were veteran photographers James Nachtwey, Eugene Richards and John White and contemporary talents Barbara Davidson, Gillian Laub, Phil Toledano and Marco Grob.

More information is available at the Eddie Adams Workshop website
www.eddieadamsworkshop.com.

October 15th, 2014

Attention Photojournalists: Upcoming Grant and Prize Deadlines

Looking for support for your visual journalism? Take note of these calls for entries.

Tim Hetherington Grant
A joint initiative of World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch, the Tim Hetherington Grant is a 20,000 euro prize awarded annually to a visual journalist. The grant is intended to help photographers and filmmakers finish ongoing projects on a human rights theme. The deadline to enter is October 31. The grant was created in memory of Tim Hetherington, who was killed in April 2011 while covering fighting in Misrata, Libya. Past winners of this juried prize have included Olivier Jobard and Fernando Moleres.
www.worldpressphoto.org/tim-hetherington-grant

Photo Philanthropy Activist Awards
PhotoPhilanthropy, which connects photographers with nonprofits to drive action for social change, is now accepting entries in its 2014 Activist Awards, open to all professional and emerging photographers who have collaborated with a nonprofit organization on a photo project. The grand prize for a professional photographer is $15,000. A prize of $5,000 will be awarded to an emerging photographer. The deadline is December 3, 2014. The jury will be announced later this month.
photophilanthropy.org/award/

Open Society Moving Walls
Open Society Foundations is now accepting proposals for Moving Walls 2015, an exhibition which will open June 2015 at the Open Society Foundations’ offices in New York City. The application deadline is November 18. Moving Walls highlights long-term photo-based documentary projects addressing human rights or social justice issues in an area where Open Society is active. Open Society covers the cost of printing, travel to attend the opening, and return shipment of photos, and provides a $2,500 participation fee.
www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/moving-walls

Related Articles

Olivier Jobard Wins 2013 Tim Hetherington Grant
Liz Hingley Wins PhotoPhilanthropy Prize

September 17th, 2014

The 50,000 Euro Controversy Over Artistic Freedom and the Carmignac Gestion Prize

carmignac-pageNewsha Tavakolian, the Tehran-based photojournalist who won the 2014 Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award, announced last week that she will return the 50,000 Euro prize, due to “irreconcilable differences over the presentation of my work.” Tavakolian claims Edouard Carmignac, head of the Carmignac Gestion investment bank which funds the Carmignac Foundation and the photojournalism prize, edited her work and changed its title “in ways that were simply not acceptable to me.” In a statement sent to PDN, a spokesperson for the Carmignac Foundation claims the organization has “postponed” planned exhibitions and the publication of Tavakolian’s work to protect the photographer and her family from threats from the Iranian government.

Created in 2009, the Carmignac Gestion photojournalism award “aims to support photojournalists who find themselves working on the front line of different situations.” Selected by a jury of photographers, curators and editors, the prize winner receives 50,000 Euros to complete a project, exhibitions in Paris and elsewhere, and the publication of a book. Previous winners of the Carmignac Gestion prize have included Kai Wiedenhoefer and Davide Monteleone. Tavakolian is the first woman awarded the prize.

Though Tavakolian was selected the 2014 winner in November of last year, her identity was kept confidential due to security concerns while she worked on her project in Iran, according to the Carmignac Foundation. She delivered images to the Foundation in July; her win was announced that month at the Recontres D’Arles photo festival.

On September 11, Tavakolian posted on her Facebook page a statement saying that she was returning the money because of disagreements with Edouard Carmignac.

“Unfortunately…from the moment I delivered the work, Mr. Carmignac insisted on personally editing my photographs as well as altering the accompanying texts to the photographs. Mr. Carmignac’s interference in the project culminated in choosing an entirely unacceptable title for my work that would undermine my project irredeemably.” Tavakolian says she titled the project, which depicts everyday life in Iran, “Blank Pages of an Iranian Photo Album,” but in announcing the prize, the Carmignac Foundation called it “The Lost Generation,” a title Tavakolian calls “overused and loaded” and “unnecessarily controversial.” She said in her Facebook statement that in her emails to Carmignac, “I tried to convince him that as the creator of this project, I am entitled to my artistic freedom. Whilst I absolutely welcome other points of view, I cannot accept that anyone other than myself should have the final say about my work. But at no point would he accept this as my right.”

Tavakolian told PDN on she had contacted the Foundation to arrange the transfer of funds to their account.

A spokesperson sent PDN a statement from the Carmignac Foundation that says Tavakolian had changed the project she had originally proposed to the jury. According to the foundation, Tavakolian “notified the Foundation of specific and significant risks posed to her own safety, and that of her family, and expressed her intention to tone down and shift the focus of her proposed ‘Burnt Generation’ project that had been selected by the Jury.

“Under these circumstances, the Foundation made the difficult decision to postpone the project rather than accept such a change, which it felt would have distorted the Award’s mission without necessarily guaranteeing the safety of its winner.”

Tavakolian told PDN via email, “The reaction from the Carmignac Foundation is a clear manipulation of the truth.” She considers the mention of safety issues “a threat” from Carmignac, she says.

“The issue at hand here is my right for artistic freedom and Mr. Carmignac’s misplaced ambition to edit, alter, and change my project, including the title to his own liking. I do not need Mr. Carmignac’s ‘protection’ as he prefers to call this drama. I have been working in Iran for 15 years and have faced many problems, but solved them myself and managed to tell the story. What [I] need from him is simple: my artistic freedom and the right to have the final say over my own project.”

Though one of Tavokolian’s images remains on the Carmignac Foundation website, exhibitions of her work have been canceled, the Foundation statement says.

Davide Monteleone, last year’s winner, served on the jury that selected Tavakolian for the 2014 prize. He says when he turned in the project on Chechnya he shot with the Carmignac Gestion prize, he worked only with artistic director Nathalie Gallon. “I had no interference from Mr. Carmignac.” Monteleone says his book and exhibition “are exactly the way I wanted them to be. I think for such a prize, this is the only way it should be.”

The Carmignac Foundation is continuing with plans to offer the prize in 2015, this time supporting works on the theme of “lawless areas in France.”