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February 29th, 2016

Andrew Ellis, Casper Dalhoff, Stephen Dupont and National Geographic Win Top Awards in Late Round POYi Judging

From "A Commitment to Life" by Casper Dalhoff, winner of the World Understanding Award at the 2016 POYi competition. ©Casper Dalhoff

From “A Commitment to Life” by Casper Dalhoff, winner of the Community Awareness Award at the 2016 POYi competition. ©Casper Dalhoff

Andrew Ellis of MediaStorm has won Multimedia Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd anual Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, while National Geographic has won Documentary Project of the Year and the Angus McDougall Overall Excellence in Editing Award.

Ellis submitted a portfolio that included stories about a farmer at risk of losing his farm because of drought in California, and a video game collector who has been selling his collection to care for his family. National Geographic won Documentary Project of the Year honors for its November 2015 single topic issue on climate change

The awards were announced late Friday after judging ended for the Visual Editing Division of the three-week competition.

Winners of top awards in other divisions included Casper Dalhoff, who won the Community Awareness Award for his project titled “A Commitment to Life,” about life in a home for the mentally and physically disabled in Denmark. Stephen Dupont won the Best Photography Book award for his book Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars 1993-2012.

As previously announced in PDN, Reportage Division winners included Paolo Marchetti, who won Photographer of the Year honors, and Hossein Fatemi, who won the World Understanding Award. In the News Division, Carolyn Van Houten of the San Antonio Express-News won Newspaper Photographer of the Year, while Al Bello of Getty Images won Sports Photographer of the Year in the Sports Division.

Judging took place at the Missouri School of Journalism from February 8-26. News Division judges were Muhammed Muheisen, Marvin Joseph, Mary F. Calvert and Michael Hamtil. Judges for the Sports Division were Wally Skalij, Nate Gordon, and Seth Greenberg, and Reportage Division judges were Ken Geiger, Jane Evelyn Atwood, Janet Jarman, and Matt Campbell. Editing Division judges were Travis Fox, Deb Pastner, Leslie dela Vega, and Pat Davison.

The judges selected winners in 40 categories. A complete list of winners and runners up, as well as their entries, are posted at POYi.org.

Related:
Paolo Marchetti, Carolyn Van Houten and Al Bello Are Top POYi Winners So Far

February 22nd, 2016

Paolo Marchetti, Carolyn Van Houten and Al Bello Are Top POYi Winners So Far

From "The Price of Vanity," by Paolo Marchetti, winner of Reportage Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd annual POYi competition. ©Paolo Marchetti

From “The Price of Vanity” by Paolo Marchetti, winner of Reportage Photographer of the Year honors at the 73rd annual POYi competition. ©Paolo Marchetti

Photographer Paolo Marchetti has won Reportage Photographer of the Year in the 73rd annual Picture of the Year International competition. His portfolio, selected as the winner over the weekend, includes stories about exploited and abused children around the world, and the industrial harvesting of animal hides for the fashion business. The latter project, called “The Price of Vanity,” also won first prize in the Science & Natural History Picture Story category.

Other POYI winners so far include Newspaper Photographer of the Year Carolyn van Houten of the San Antonio Express-News. Her portfolio includes stories about the oil bust in south Texas and the aftermath of the May 2015 floods in Blanco, Texas.

Al Bello of Getty Images won Sports Photographer of the Year honors for a portfolio that shows Bello’s eye for decisive moments, as well as dramatic action, light, and camera angles.

Francine Orr of the Los Angeles Times won top prize for Issue Reporting Story in the newspaper category for her story about families living on the social and economic margins in a down-and-out motel.

Végh László of Magyar Nemzet, a Hungarian daily, won first prize for Feature Picture Story in the newspaper category for a project titled “Subcarpathia in the shadow of the Russian-Ukranian War.”

Photographer Hossein Fatemi won POYi’s World Understanding award for his portfolio titled “An Iranian Journey,” about the hidden complexity and modernity of Iranian society.

Brent Stirton, recent winner of National Geographic Photographer’s Award, has won POYi’s Environmental Vision award for his project about the ivory wars in central Africa.

Iranian photographer Sadegh Souri won first place in the Issue Reporting Story category for her project about young Iranian women on death row, called “Waiting for Capital Punishment”

POYi contest judging began February 8 and continues through February 26. Winners have been selected in more than two dozens newspapers, sports and reportage categories so far, but POYi has a tradition of withholding the names of winners until all judging is competed. This week, judges will select winners for the competition’s editing categories, which include Documentary Project of the Year and Multimedia Photographer of the Year.

February 12th, 2016

Fund Your Work: Four Documentary Photography Prizes Looking for Applications

The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University has extended the deadline for its $3,000 Documentary Essay Prize to February 23, 2016. The prize honors a documentary photography project that is ongoing or that has been completed in the past two years. The three-year old award alternates year to year in honoring writing and photography. The previous winner for photography was Latvian photographer Iveta Vaivode, for her series “Somewhere on a Disappearing Path,” which reimagined the photographer’s family album. There is a $35 entry fee.

CDS is also accepting applications for the $10,000 Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize. Named in recognition of the collaboration between Lange, a photographer, and Taylor, a writer, the prize recognizes the work of documentary artists pursuing projects that feature an interplay of words and pictures. Recent winners include Michel Huneault, Jon Lowenstein, Jen Kinney, Sarah Dohrman and Tiana Markova-Gold, and Teru Kuwayama and Christian Parenti. Any artist, or team of artists, pursuing a project that combines words and images can apply for the prize. There are no nationality restrictions. The entry fee is $65, and applications are being accepted through May 9, 2016.

Photographers living and working in the Arab region can apply for one of 12, $5,000 grants being awarded by The Arab Fund for Arts and Culture in partnership with the Prince Claus Fund for Culture and Development and the Magnum Foundation. Photographers awarded the AFAC’s Arab Documentary Photo Program grants are expected to complete projects within eight months, and they are required to attend two workshops. There is no fee to enter, and applications are due by April 1, 2016.

The UK-based Royal Photographic Society, in partnership with The Guardian, is currently seeking entries for the £2000 ($2900) Joan Wakelin Bursary, which supports a “photographic essay on an overseas social documentary issue.” The bursary, named for Wakelin, a deceased Honorary Fellow of the society, is open to photographers of any nationality and there are no application fees. Shortlisted photographers, however, are required to interview at The Guardian’s offices in London in July. Applications are due May 20, 2016.

Related: Advice on Funding Your Photo Project
How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects
Advice From a Fundraising Expert About Soliciting Donations and Applying For Grants
$10K Lange-Taylor Prize Goes to Michel Huneault for Project About Oil Train Disaster

January 6th, 2016

Documentary Photographers: Contest Deadlines Approaching Fast

Marzell Williamson plays the tuba, by Jerry Wolford, winner of Photojournalist of the Year honors at last year's Best of Photojournalism competition. ©News & Record/Jerry Wolford Photojournalism 2015 Ph

Marzell Williamson plays the tuba, Greensboro, NC. Jerry Wolford won Photojournalist of the Year honors for a portfolio including this image, at last year’s Best of Photojournalism competition. ©News & Record/Jerry Wolford

Winter is the height of the photojournalism contest season, and entry deadlines are fast approaching for a number of international competitions. Among them are:

The World Press Photo entry deadline is January 13, although entrants must register by January 7. (Multimedia entries are due by  January 20.) There is no entry fee, but participants must provide proof of their professional status.  This year’s contest is subject to a new code of ethics and strict new rules about photo manipulation, as well as other rule changes. See the contest website for details. Photo contest winners will be announced February 18. The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2015 will receive a cash prize of 10,000 EUR, and winners in all categories will be invited to travel to Amersterdam for an awards ceremony in April at the expense of World Press Photo organizers.

Entries for the 73rd POYi competition are due by January 15. The competition includes multiple categories in photojournalism, multimedia, and visual editing divisions. The entry fee is $50. Prizes are primarily bragging rights and exposure, but winners of several premier categories also receive modest cash awards–$1,000 for Photographer of the Year and $500 for Newspaper Photographer of the Year, for instance. Judging takes place from February 8-25 at the Missouri School of Journalism, which sponsors the contest. Details and rules are on the POYi website.

Photo entries for the Eyes of History competition are due January 15. The competition is sponsored by the White News Photographers Association. The entry fee is $67. The competition has other divisions with different entry due dates: video entries are due January 29, multimedia entries are due January 31, and student entries are due February 1. The entry fees for those divisions also vary. All divisions except the student division are open to WHNP members only. See the WHNP website for complete details.

Best of Photojournalism entries are due by January 29. The contest, which is sponsored by National Press Photographers Association (NPPA), is open to NPPA members and non-members alike. There is no entry fee, and there are no monetary prizes (just bragging rights and plaques). Like POYi, BOP includes still photo, multimedia and editing divisions, plus a video division. Contest details and rules are available on the NPPA website. No date has been set for announcing winners, but winners for past competitions have been announced in March or April.

The deadline for entering PDN’s Photo Annual competition is February 3. In addition to photojournalism/documentary and video/multimedia categories, the competition categories include: advertising, editorial, photo books, sports, self-promotion, stock photography, personal work and student work. The entry fee is $50 for single images, and $60 for each series of images. Cash awards total more than $20,000. Contest information and rules are available at the PDN Photo Annual website.

The Piclet.org International Prize for Contemporary African Photography  (POPCAP) is accepting entries until February 7. The prize is for work about Africa or the diaspora of an African country. Entrants must submit a single series or story consisting of 10 to 25 images. There is no entry fee. The prizes include an artists’ residency. Finalists will be announced February 29, and five winners will be announced March 7. Past winners include Zed Nelson, Léonard Pongo, Anoek Steketee, Patrick Willocq, and Cristina de Middel. Full details and rules are available at the POPCAP website.

Entries for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, sponsored by Natural History Museum in London, are due by February 25. “Judges are looking for outstanding images that raise awareness of nature’s beauty and fragility, while also championing the highest ethical standards in wildlife photography,” according to the contest website. Entrants may submit up to 25 images. The entry fee is £30.00 ($44). Top prize is £10,000 ($14,675) for Best Single Image, but the competition awards monetary prizes in a number of categories. Winners will be notified May 13. Past winners include Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols, Greg du Toit, and Paul Nicklen. Full contest details are available at the WPY website.

Related:
After Staged-Photo Debacle, World Press Changes Rules

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year Honors at 2015 POYi Competition

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize (PDN subscription required)

November 25th, 2015

After Staged-Photo Debacle, World Press Changes Rules

The 2016 World Press Photo contest will be carried out with new rules, guidelines and procedures, organizers announced today in Amsterdam. The changes include a new code of ethics, backed by more specific rules against photo manipulation, as well as other changes.

The new code of ethics reflects the World Press Photo Foundation’s efforts at reform and transparency, undertaken in the wake of a photo manipulation scandal last year that led to the disqualification of 20 percent of the final round entries, and the revocation of a first-place prize in the Contemporary Issues category.

“We want the audience to have trust in the accuracy of the pictures that win awards and are shown in our exhibition, so, for the first time, the contest has a code of ethics that sets out what we expect from entrants,” World Press Photo managing director Lars Boering said in a prepared statement.

Entries for the 2016 World Press Photo competition are due by January 13, 2016, at noon Central European Time.

The new code of ethics calls on photographers entering the contest not to stage events, and to avoid being misled into photographing events staged by others; to make no “material” changes to the content of their images; to provide accurate caption information; to edit stories in a manner that is accurate and fair; and to be open and transparent about how they made the photos they enter in the World Press Photo contest.

In support of that code, the new rules define illegal manipulation as “staging or re-enacting events” and “adding or removing content from the image.”

For example, World Press Photo says it is not acceptable to remove physical marks on the body, small objects in the pictures, reflected light spots, shadows, or extraneous items on a picture’s border that could not be removed by cropping. It is also unacceptable to add elements by cloning  highlights, painting in object details, photo montage, or replicating material on the border of a picture to make a neat crop possible.

But “cropping that removes extraneous details is permitted” and “sensor dust or scratches on scans of negatives can be removed,” the 2016 rules say. They also say that “processing by itself” does not constitution manipulation. Specifically, “adjustments of color of conversion to grayscale that do not alter content are permitted,” the new rules say.

(more…)

November 17th, 2015

Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions

The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University is accepting submissions for their $3,000 Documentary Essay Prize now through February 16, 2016. The prize honors a documentary photography project that is ongoing or that has been completed in the past two years.

The three-year old award alternates year to year in honoring writing and photography. The previous winner for photography was Latvian photographer Iveta Vaivode, for her series “Somewhere on a Disappearing Path,” which reimagined the photographer’s family album.

In addition to the cash award, the winner will have his or her work featured on the CDS website and in their periodical Document. The work will also become part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library, Duke University.

The winner will be announced in June 2016.

Related: Nadia Sablin’s Project About Her Aunts’ Lives in a Small Russian Village was Awarded the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

November 13th, 2015

Daniel Mayrit Wins $10K First PhotoBook Award from Aperture, Paris Photo

© Riot Books

You Haven’t Seen Their Faces by Daniel Mayrit, © Riot Books

Daniel Mayrit has won the First PhotoBook Award and a $10,000 prize at the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. The award, which is given for an outstanding monograph, was announced today at a ceremony at the Paris Photo festival. Mayrit’s book, You Haven’t Seen Their Faces (published by Riot Books) features photos of “the most powerful people in London” that have been rendered in grainy black and white by the artist to imitate closed-circuit TV footage this is used by police during criminal investigations.

The prize for PhotoBook of the Year was awarded to Illustrated People by Thomas Mailaender (published by the Archive of Modern Conflict/RVB Books). Maileander laid negatives, pulled from the Archive, over the bodies of his models, then projected a UV lamp onto them: “Maileander then photographed each of his models before the sun made the image disappear,” according to the publisher’s description of the book.

A special Juror’s mention was awarded to Deadline by Will Steacey, a tabloid-sized, newsprint publication which chronicles the decline of The Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper.

Images of Conviction: The Construction of Visual Evidence won Photography Catalogue of the Year; it was published in connection with an exhibition at Le Bal in Paris of photos and video used as crime evidence.

The winners and all the shortlisted photo books are currently on display in Paris. The jurors who selected this year’s winners were: Frish Brandt, president of Fraenkel Gallery; Christophe Boutin, cofounder of onestar press; Clément Chéroux, curator of photography at Centre Pompidou; Donatien Grau, author and editor; and Lorenzo Piani, curator of the Enea Righi Collection, Bologna.

The shortlist was selected by Yannick Bouillis, founder, Offprint Projects; Julien Frydman of the LUMA Foundation; Lesley A. Martin, creative director of Aperture; Mutsuko Ota, editor-in-chief, IMA and Christoph Wiesner, artistic director of Paris Photo.

Related Articles

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Nicoló Degiorgis Wins $10k Paris Photo-Aperture First PhotoBook Award

October 28th, 2015

Lucie Awards: George Tice, Kathy Ryan Honored; Sandro and Maxim Dondyuk Share International Photographer of the Year

Fran Drescher and Simon Doonan honor Roxanne Lowit, who won the Lucie Award for Achievement in Fashion.

Fran Drescher and Simon Doonan honor Roxanne Lowit, who won the Lucie Award for Achievement in Fashion.

George Tice, Jerry Uelsmann, Danny Lyon, Roxanne Lowitt, Stephanie Sinclair and photo editor Kathy Ryan were among the honorees at the 13th annual Lucie Awards, held last night at New York City’s Carnegie Hall. The International Photography Award was a tie: The honor was split between the Ukraine-based Maxim Dondyuk, honored for his recent work on the ongoing conflict and demonstrations in his country, and Chicago-based photographer Sandro, whose project “Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich” reimagined classic photos with actor John Malkovich as his sole subject.

The Discovery of the Year award went to the Finnish photographer Ville Kansanen for his fine-art project “The Procession of Spectres.” The Lifetime Achievement award went to large-format documentary photographer George Tice, who noted in his acceptance speech that he won his first trophy for his photography when he was 14.

Rangefinder‘s Libby Peterson reported on the awards ceremony. For her full report on the awards, including winners of the awards for curator of the year, book publisher of the year and photo editor of the year, see Rangefinder‘s Photo Forward blog.

Related:

Maxim Dondyuk: Inside a Camp for Cossack Youth

October 23rd, 2015

Lucie Technical Awards Highlight the Great Gear Behind the Great Photos

Logo_LucieTechnicalAwards_150609

Photographers have long been familiar with the Lucies, one of the marquee awards in the industry. This year, the technology enabling the world’s great photography earned its day in the sun with the inaugural Lucie Technical Awards, which were announced this week in New York.

Lucie Technical Awards were handed out across multiple product categories for technologies and services introduced over the past year with the exception of the darkroom category, which focused on innovative businesses irrespective of when they were established.

Here’s who took home the trophy.

BEST CROP SENSOR CAMERA: Canon EOS 7D Mark II

BEST FULL FRAME CAMERA: Sony a7R II

BEST MEDIUM FORMAT CAMERA: Hasselblad H5D-50c

BEST CAMERA BAG: ThinkThank Photo Airport Helipak Backpack

BEST TRIPOD: Gitzo Traveler Series 1

BEST SUPERZOOM LENS: AF-S Nikkor 200-500mm F/5.6E ED VR

BEST WIDE ANGLE LENS: Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 16-35mm F2.8 ZA SSM II

BEST ZOOM LENS: Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II

BEST LED LIGHTING ELEMENT: Arri Skypanel & Lume Cube (a tie)

BEST SOFTWARE: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 6

BEST MEMORY CARD: SanDisk High Endurance Video Monitoring microSDHC and microSDXC Memory Card

BEST ACTION CAMERA: GoPro Hero4 Session

BEST INSTANT FILM & CAMERA: Lomography Lomo’Instant White Edition

BEST DARKROOM: Labyrinth Photographic, London

September 21st, 2015

$10K Lange–Taylor Prize Goes to Michel Huneault for Project About Oil Train Disaster

Chaudière River at sunrise, February 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Chaudière River at sunrise,” February 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

Canadian photographer Michel Huneault has won the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University, CDS announced today. Huneault was recognized with the $10,000 award for his project documenting the aftermath of an oil train derailment and explosion that killed 47 people in the small town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec.

The award, named in honor of the partnership between documentary photographer Dorothea Lange and writer Paul Taylor, supports long-term documentary work that combines images and words to tell a story.

Huneault’s project, “Post Mégantic,” relies on photographs, videos, oral histories, and installations to delve into the aftermath of the catastrophic explosion in 2013, which levelled the Lac-Mégantic town center and left one in 128 citizens dead. Huneault has spent more than two months in the town over the course of fourteen trips, and he plans to use the the Lange–Taylor Prize to continue the project.

Serge, September 2013. From "Post MÈgantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Serge,” September 2013. From “Post MÈgantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“I’ll keep going back [to Lac-Mégantic]—hopefully to find more light and healing—but also up the train track toward North Dakota, to where this oil and darkness originated,” Huneault writes in his project statement. “Today, although Mégantic’s center remains flattened and contaminated while the criminal investigation continues, the tracks were the first thing to be rebuilt and train traffic has resumed. While no oil is transiting here, [they are] passing through other North American towns.”

Dandelion achenes, June 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Dandelion achenes,” June 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

The Center for Documentary Studies awarded an honorable mention to Alice Leora Briggs and Julián Cardona for their project about violence in Juárez, Mexico. In addition, Serge J-F. Levy received special recognition for his project about relocating from New York City to Tucson, Arizona.

Previous winners Lange-Taylor Prize winners include Antonin Kratochvil and Jan Novak; Donna DeCesare and Luis Rodriguez; Paola Ferrario and Mary Cappello; Larry Frolick and Donald Weber; Teru Kuwayama and Christian Parenti, and Jen Kinney. The prize has been awarded a total of 23 times.

Related: Video Pick: “He Doesn’t Love You Any More”
Lange-Taylor Prize of 10K Given For Photo Project On Tiny Alaska Town
A Photographic Response to an Oil Train Explosion