You are currently browsing the archives for the awards category.

November 17th, 2015

Fund Your Work: $3K Documentary Photo Essay Prize from CDS Seeking Submissions

The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University is accepting submissions for their $3,000 Documentary Essay Prize now through February 16, 2016. The prize honors a documentary photography project that is ongoing or that has been completed in the past two years.

The three-year old award alternates year to year in honoring writing and photography. The previous winner for photography was Latvian photographer Iveta Vaivode, for her series “Somewhere on a Disappearing Path,” which reimagined the photographer’s family album.

In addition to the cash award, the winner will have his or her work featured on the CDS website and in their periodical Document. The work will also become part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library, Duke University.

The winner will be announced in June 2016.

Related: Nadia Sablin’s Project About Her Aunts’ Lives in a Small Russian Village was Awarded the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

November 13th, 2015

Daniel Mayrit Wins $10K First PhotoBook Award from Aperture, Paris Photo

© Riot Books

You Haven’t Seen Their Faces by Daniel Mayrit, © Riot Books

Daniel Mayrit has won the First PhotoBook Award and a $10,000 prize at the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. The award, which is given for an outstanding monograph, was announced today at a ceremony at the Paris Photo festival. Mayrit’s book, You Haven’t Seen Their Faces (published by Riot Books) features photos of “the most powerful people in London” that have been rendered in grainy black and white by the artist to imitate closed-circuit TV footage this is used by police during criminal investigations.

The prize for PhotoBook of the Year was awarded to Illustrated People by Thomas Mailaender (published by the Archive of Modern Conflict/RVB Books). Maileander laid negatives, pulled from the Archive, over the bodies of his models, then projected a UV lamp onto them: “Maileander then photographed each of his models before the sun made the image disappear,” according to the publisher’s description of the book.

A special Juror’s mention was awarded to Deadline by Will Steacey, a tabloid-sized, newsprint publication which chronicles the decline of The Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper.

Images of Conviction: The Construction of Visual Evidence won Photography Catalogue of the Year; it was published in connection with an exhibition at Le Bal in Paris of photos and video used as crime evidence.

The winners and all the shortlisted photo books are currently on display in Paris. The jurors who selected this year’s winners were: Frish Brandt, president of Fraenkel Gallery; Christophe Boutin, cofounder of onestar press; Clément Chéroux, curator of photography at Centre Pompidou; Donatien Grau, author and editor; and Lorenzo Piani, curator of the Enea Righi Collection, Bologna.

The shortlist was selected by Yannick Bouillis, founder, Offprint Projects; Julien Frydman of the LUMA Foundation; Lesley A. Martin, creative director of Aperture; Mutsuko Ota, editor-in-chief, IMA and Christoph Wiesner, artistic director of Paris Photo.

Related Articles

Inside the Decline of American Newspapers

Nicoló Degiorgis Wins $10k Paris Photo-Aperture First PhotoBook Award

October 28th, 2015

Lucie Awards: George Tice, Kathy Ryan Honored; Sandro and Maxim Dondyuk Share International Photographer of the Year

Fran Drescher and Simon Doonan honor Roxanne Lowit, who won the Lucie Award for Achievement in Fashion.

Fran Drescher and Simon Doonan honor Roxanne Lowit, who won the Lucie Award for Achievement in Fashion.

George Tice, Jerry Uelsmann, Danny Lyon, Roxanne Lowitt, Stephanie Sinclair and photo editor Kathy Ryan were among the honorees at the 13th annual Lucie Awards, held last night at New York City’s Carnegie Hall. The International Photography Award was a tie: The honor was split between the Ukraine-based Maxim Dondyuk, honored for his recent work on the ongoing conflict and demonstrations in his country, and Chicago-based photographer Sandro, whose project “Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich” reimagined classic photos with actor John Malkovich as his sole subject.

The Discovery of the Year award went to the Finnish photographer Ville Kansanen for his fine-art project “The Procession of Spectres.” The Lifetime Achievement award went to large-format documentary photographer George Tice, who noted in his acceptance speech that he won his first trophy for his photography when he was 14.

Rangefinder‘s Libby Peterson reported on the awards ceremony. For her full report on the awards, including winners of the awards for curator of the year, book publisher of the year and photo editor of the year, see Rangefinder‘s Photo Forward blog.


Maxim Dondyuk: Inside a Camp for Cossack Youth

October 23rd, 2015

Lucie Technical Awards Highlight the Great Gear Behind the Great Photos


Photographers have long been familiar with the Lucies, one of the marquee awards in the industry. This year, the technology enabling the world’s great photography earned its day in the sun with the inaugural Lucie Technical Awards, which were announced this week in New York.

Lucie Technical Awards were handed out across multiple product categories for technologies and services introduced over the past year with the exception of the darkroom category, which focused on innovative businesses irrespective of when they were established.

Here’s who took home the trophy.




BEST CAMERA BAG: ThinkThank Photo Airport Helipak Backpack

BEST TRIPOD: Gitzo Traveler Series 1

BEST SUPERZOOM LENS: AF-S Nikkor 200-500mm F/5.6E ED VR

BEST WIDE ANGLE LENS: Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 16-35mm F2.8 ZA SSM II

BEST ZOOM LENS: Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM II

BEST LED LIGHTING ELEMENT: Arri Skypanel & Lume Cube (a tie)

BEST SOFTWARE: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 6

BEST MEMORY CARD: SanDisk High Endurance Video Monitoring microSDHC and microSDXC Memory Card


BEST INSTANT FILM & CAMERA: Lomography Lomo’Instant White Edition

BEST DARKROOM: Labyrinth Photographic, London

September 21st, 2015

$10K Lange–Taylor Prize Goes to Michel Huneault for Project About Oil Train Disaster

Chaudière River at sunrise, February 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Chaudière River at sunrise,” February 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

Canadian photographer Michel Huneault has won the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University, CDS announced today. Huneault was recognized with the $10,000 award for his project documenting the aftermath of an oil train derailment and explosion that killed 47 people in the small town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec.

The award, named in honor of the partnership between documentary photographer Dorothea Lange and writer Paul Taylor, supports long-term documentary work that combines images and words to tell a story.

Huneault’s project, “Post Mégantic,” relies on photographs, videos, oral histories, and installations to delve into the aftermath of the catastrophic explosion in 2013, which levelled the Lac-Mégantic town center and left one in 128 citizens dead. Huneault has spent more than two months in the town over the course of fourteen trips, and he plans to use the the Lange–Taylor Prize to continue the project.

Serge, September 2013. From "Post MÈgantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Serge,” September 2013. From “Post MÈgantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“I’ll keep going back [to Lac-Mégantic]—hopefully to find more light and healing—but also up the train track toward North Dakota, to where this oil and darkness originated,” Huneault writes in his project statement. “Today, although Mégantic’s center remains flattened and contaminated while the criminal investigation continues, the tracks were the first thing to be rebuilt and train traffic has resumed. While no oil is transiting here, [they are] passing through other North American towns.”

Dandelion achenes, June 2014. From "Post Mégantic" by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

“Dandelion achenes,” June 2014. From “Post Mégantic” by Michel Huneault, winner of the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize.

The Center for Documentary Studies awarded an honorable mention to Alice Leora Briggs and Julián Cardona for their project about violence in Juárez, Mexico. In addition, Serge J-F. Levy received special recognition for his project about relocating from New York City to Tucson, Arizona.

Previous winners Lange-Taylor Prize winners include Antonin Kratochvil and Jan Novak; Donna DeCesare and Luis Rodriguez; Paola Ferrario and Mary Cappello; Larry Frolick and Donald Weber; Teru Kuwayama and Christian Parenti, and Jen Kinney. The prize has been awarded a total of 23 times.

Related: Video Pick: “He Doesn’t Love You Any More”
Lange-Taylor Prize of 10K Given For Photo Project On Tiny Alaska Town
A Photographic Response to an Oil Train Explosion

September 10th, 2015

Getty and Instagram Announce Winners of $10K Grants For Underreported Stories


An image by Adriana Zehbrauskas, one of the winners of the inaugural Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers using the social media platform to tell underreported stories. Here, a woman holds her daughter before her baptism at Mexico City’s Basílica de Guadalupe.

Getty Images, in partnership with Instagram, have announced three winners of the first annual Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers who’ve used the social media platform to tell underreported stories around the world. The winners, all of whom are experienced professional photographers, have documented communities in Bangladesh, Latin America and Russia. They will each receive $10,000 and mentorship from Getty photojournalists, and their work will be part of an exhibit which opens today at Photoville in Brooklyn, New York.

Brazilian-born photojournalist Adriana Zehbrauskas (@adrianazehbrauskas), who lives in Mexico City and whose clients include The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and The Sunday Times, was recognized for her photographs covering climate change and the everyday lives of Latin Americans. Zehbruskas, who worked as a staff photographer at a Brazilian newspaper for 11 years before moving to Mexico, says she began publishing her work on Instagram “naturally” and that her feed evolved from a place where she shared personal images to a space for professional work. “The fact that you could share something in real time appealed to me, maybe because of my newspaper background,” she told PDN via email. She says Instagram allowed her to “post images that were true to my vision and style” without having to conform to the wishes of a publication. It also allowed her to “build a story over time, in just one place.”

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse.

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse. This image depicts the prosthetic leg of Raihan Kabir, who lost his right leg after a machine smashed it during the collapse, trapping him for 14.5 hours in the wreckage.

Documentary photographer Ismail Ferdous won for his project “After Rana Plaza,” which documents the lives of the survivors of the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Ferdous created the @afterranaplaza Instagram feed to share those stories. Ferdous has an unusual way of sharing his stories on Instagram, publishing still images with audio commentary from his subjects.


An image of a child with Russian Airborne troops, from Dmitry Markov’s Instagram feed, where he often depicts orphaned and underprivileged children.

Dmitry Markov ( of Pskov, Russia, has used Instagram to share his photographs of orphaned children and highlight the work of charities for which he volunteers, such as the Russian Children’s Fund.

The three recipients were chosen from more than 1,200 photographers in 109 countries, Getty Images said in a statement. Judges for the grants were National Geographic photographer David Guttenfelder; TIME director of photography Kira Pollack; photographers Maggie Steber and Malin Fezehai; and photographer and @everydayiran co-founder Ramin Talaie.

The three recipients “could not better exemplify the original aim of this grant: to document and share stories of underrepresented communities that otherwise rarely come into focus,” said Elodie Mailliet, Getty Images’ Senior Director of Content Partnerships.

Zehbrauskas plans to use the grant money to start a new project creating portraits of the families of 43 students who disappeared from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers School last year. Family portraits are important as “a proof of existence, [and in] perpetuating memory and hopefully saving [the missing students] from the fate of being forever forgotten,” Zehbrauskas says.

Beyond the financial award, the recognition for her work “means a great deal,” she adds. “It means that someone is listening to what you have to say, that it is worth it to keep doing it and believing in it.”

Related: Picture Story: Everyday Africa on Instagram
Are Visual Storytelling Platforms a Good Thing for Photographers? (PDN subscribers only; login required)
PDN Video: Ruddy Roye on Instagram, Storytelling, and Risking the “Angry Black Man” Label
New Instagram Feed Highlights Effects of Climate Change

September 9th, 2015

Newsha Tavakolian Wins €100K Cultural Prize; Pledges to €45K to Help Refugees, Charities in Iran

Photographer Newsha Tavakolian. ©Frank van Beek

Photographer Newsha Tavakolian. ©Frank van Beek

Iranian photographer Newsha Tavakolian has been named winner of the 2015 Principal Prince Claus Award, the Prince Claus Fund for Culture and Development announced last week in Amsterdam. She will receive a 100,000 Euro prize, and she has already pledged to donate nearly half of her prize money to charity, including an aid organization for Iraqi and Syrian refugees.

In announcing the award, Prince Claus Fund organizers described Tavakolian as “a trailblazing artist and photojournalist whose work offers a compelling insider’s perspective on contemporary life in Iran and the Middle East…she fuses artistic work and documentary reportage to create intimate portraits and unexpected human stories that enable us to look deeply inside societies. ” Tavakolian will receive the prize December 2 at a ceremony at the Royal Palace in Amsterdam.

Ten other individuals and organizations will also receive awards. But Tavakolian was named the winner of the Prince Claus Fund’s top award “for her beautiful and moving testimony of the complexities and ambiguities of contemporary Iran” as well as for her courage, critical insight, support for young photographers, and her commitment to women’s voices, organizers said.

In addition to the prize money, Tavakolian’s award includes an exhibition of her work at The Prince Claus Fund Gallery in Amsterdam from November 27 to March 4, 2016.

“Unfortunately it is hard for me to enjoy this prize as much as I would like to, seeing the region where I work and live in flames and tens of thousands seeking refuge in faraway lands,” the photographer said on her Facebook page, after the award was announced.

She went on to say she would donate 15,000 Euros to an organization that supports Syrian and Iraqi refugees. “[I] want to give back [for] all the kindness Iraqi’s and Syrians always welcomed me with, despite the dire circumstances they live in,” she wrote on Facebook.

Tavakolian pledged another 13,000 Euros to an independent photography prize in Iran that supports young photographers; 10,000 Euros to an Iranian charity that helps children with cancer; and 7,000 Euros to several organizations in Iran that protect animals.

The Prince Claus Awards  were established 19 years ago to honor outstanding achievements in the field of culture and development. They are awarded annually to individuals and groups who have had a positive impact on the development of their societies, according to the Prince Claus Fund web site.

Among other winners of 2015 Prince Claus Awards was photographer Latif Al-Ani, who documented life in Iraq from the 1950s to the 1970s. The other winners included artists, journalists, and arts collectives.

This year, the fund invited 250 people to submit nominations for the awards. Winners were selected from 103 nominations. Jurors included filmmaker and journalist Bregtje van der Haak (Netherlands); architect and writer Suad Amiry (Palestine); art historian Salah Hassan (Sudan); writer Kettly Mars (Haiti); theater producer and director Ong Keng Sen (Singapore); and independent curator Gabriela Salgado (Argentina).

August 14th, 2015

Álvaro Laíz Wins 2015 FotoVisura Personal Project Grant

Photo By Álvaro Laíz

Kostya, a 33-year-old Udege hunter, looks out at the taiga from his cabin. © Álvaro Laíz

Visura announced today that Álvaro Laíz has won the 2015 FotoVisura Grant for Outstanding Personal Project for “THE HUNT,” his project documenting the shamanistic Udege people of Russia’s Far East taiga, or boreal forest. He received a $2,000 cash prize, a paid commission from the Washington Post to publish his work on its In Sight blog, as well as a lifetime sponsored GUILD membership with Visura.

Laíz became acquainted with the Udege when he traveled to Southeast Russia for the first time in the fall of 2014. He worked with national parks, scientists, rangers and Udege hunters. He lived with them for a month, making portraits and documenting their hunt. One hunter he met (seen in the above photo) died just hours after Laíz photographed him. The Udege practice animism, a belief that non-human life forms such as plants, animals and inanimate objects possess spirits. “Animism and the relationship among nature and culture are not really new to me,” Láiz told the Post. “I have been working on those topics for the last six years.” In fact, it was a legend of a poacher killed by the dark spirit of a tiger he had killed is partly responsible for his initial interest in the culture.

Three finalists for the Visura grant were also named.  Linda Forsell’s “Children who have Children” was named “Top Finalist,” and both Annie Flannagan’s “We Grew Up With Gum in Our Hair” and Aaron Vincent Elkaim’s “Where the River Runs Through were named “Finalists.”

The entries for the FotoVisura grant were evaluated by a six-member jury: MaryAnne Golon of the Washington Post; Judy Walgren of the San Francisco Chronicle; Simon Barnett of CNN Photos; Grey Hutton of VICE; Elizabeth Griffin of Esquire; and photographer Sebastian Liste, a member of NOOR.

July 10th, 2015

JH Engström, Wiktoria Wojciechowska Win 2015 Leica Oskar Barnack Awards

© JH Engstrom

© JH Engstrom

Swedish photographer JH Engström has been awarded the Leica Oskar Barnack 2015 Award, which comes with a 25,000 Euro prize, for “Tout Va Bien,” a project consisting of landscapes, portraits and diaristic snapshots. Engström’s award, announced this week at the Rencontres D’Arles in France, also includes a Leica M camera and lens.

Wiktoria Wojciechowska, who is Polish, has been named the winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Newcomer Award. She will receive 5,000 Euros and a Leica M camera and lens. Her winning project, “Short Flashes,” consists of street photos she made while living in China in 2013 and 2014.

The festival Rencontres D’Arles continues through this weekend and includes the announcement of several other awards.

The LUMA Rencontres Dummy Book Award, supporting the production of proposed photo book, was announced July 7. Yann Gross will receive 25,000 Euros towards the publication of his book titled The Jungle Book.

Yesterday photographer Tommaso Tannini’s book H. Said He Loved Us (published by Discipula) was named the winner of the Author Book Award, which comes with an 8,000 Euro prize. The juried award honors an outstanding contemporary photography book. Honorable mentions were given to Miguel Angel Toneron for his book The Random Series (published by Dalpine) and to Dima Gavrysh for his book Inshallah (published by Kehrer Verlag).

Related Articles
Evgenia Arbugaeva Wins Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2013

July 10th, 2015

Shortlist for $105K Prix Pictet Announced

Alixandra Fazzina was shortlisted for “A Million Shillings—Escape from Somalia,” her long-term project documenting migrants and refugees from Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. © Prix Pictet Ltd 2015

Alixandra Fazzina was shortlisted for “A Million Shillings—Escape from Somalia,” her long-term project documenting migrants and refugees from Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. © Prix Pictet Ltd 2015

The organizers of the Prix Pictet today announced the 12 photographers on the shortlist for the sixth cycle of the award, which was founded by Swiss private bank Pictet Group. At CHF 100,000 CHF ($105,487), the Prix Pictet is one of the richest prizes for photography.

Each of the six cycles of the Prix Pictet have centered on a particular theme related to sustainability. The theme for the sixth Prix Pictet is Disorder. In a statement announcing the theme at a reception in November 2014, Prix Pictet chair Stephen Barber said: “The eternal struggle between order and chaos is the central tension of our times. Throughout the world there are examples of attempts to impose order without a clear understanding of the long-term consequences of so doing. With each passing day the illusion of order is shattered in a thousand different ways.” Previous themes have included Consumption, Power, Growth, Earth and Water.

The shortlisted photographers for the 2015 prize are: Ilit Azoulay (Israel); Valérie Belin (France); Matthew Brandt (U.S.); Maxim Dondyuk (Ukraine); Alixandra Fazzina (U.K.); Ori Gersht (Israel); John Gossage (U.S.); Pieter Hugo (South Africa); Gideon Mendel (South Africa); Sophie Ristelhueber (France); Brent Stirton (South Africa); Yang Yongliang (China). (more…)