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April 16th, 2015

Kevin Frayer Wins Fourth Annual Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

©Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

©Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Kevin Frayer has been named winner of the 2015 Getty Images and Chris Hondros Fund (CHF) Award of $20,000, and Diana Markosian has won the $5,000 emerging photojournalist award, the photo agency announced today. Both photographers are represented by Getty. They will receive their awards April 30 at a reception in New York City.

CHF was established to support the work of photojournalists whose work reflects the legacy and vision of Hondros, who was killed in 2011 while on assignment covering the Libyan civil war. The three previous CHF Award winners were Daniel Berehulak, Andrea Bruce, and Tomás Munita.

Frayer, a Canadian photojournalist based in Beijing, has documented conflict throughout the Middle East, and currently covers stories in Asia. “I aspire to use this opportunity to create meaningful photography that would move Chris in the same way his images reached me and so many others,” Frayer said in a prepared statement.

Markosian, a Moscow-born photographer and 2014 PDN’s 30, has shot assignments for National Geographic, The New York Times and other publications. She has completed several long-term projects, including “Inventing My Father,”  a widely acclaimed work about reconnecting with her estranged father.

“Chris encouraged me to take a chance on myself, to find my own way,” she says in a prepared statement.

Jurors included Getty Images Vice President for News Pancho Bernasconi, New York Times photographer Todd Heisler, freelance photojournalist Jeff Swensen and CHF Board President Christina Piaia.

Related Articles
Daniel Berehulak to Receive Getty Images  & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them as They Lived

April 15th, 2015

Åsa Sjöström, Amirtharaj Stephen Win 6th Annual Activist Awards

From "The Secret Camps." ©Åsa Sjöström

From “The Secret Camps.” ©Åsa Sjöström

Åsa Sjöström has won the $15,000 Activist Award for professional photographers, while Amirtharaj Stephen has won the $5,000 award for emerging photographers, Catchlight has announced.

Formerly known as PhotoPhilanthropy, Catchlight sponsors the Activist Awards to recognize photographic excellence in service of NGOs addressing a variety of social issues.

Sjöström’s winning essay, called The Secret Camps, explores the issue of domestic violence through her images of women and children taking temporary refuge in summer camps operated by the Women’s Rights Association of Malmö, Sweden. “I want to create awareness and also to induce a genuine situation between me and the people in my photographs,” the photographer told Catchlight.

In a prepared statement about this year’s award winners, jurors praised Sjöström’s project for a “visually distinctive approach” that captures a transformational time for victims of domestic violence and that “brings attention to an issue that affects women and children all over the world.”

Finalists for the professional prize were Annalisa Natali Murri and Sergi Camara. (more…)

March 24th, 2015

Heidi Levine Wins First Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award

American photojournalist Heidi Levine has won the first Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism award, the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) has announced. The $20,000 prize was established in memory of Niedringhaus, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Associated Press photographer who was killed while covering the elections in Afghanistan in 2014.

Levine, who lives in Jerusalem, has covered the ongoing conflict in Gaza. ““Her courage and commitment to the story in Gaza is unwavering. She documents tragic events under dire circumstances while displaying a depth of compassion for the people she encounters,” the jury wrote in a statement announcing the award. (more…)

March 20th, 2015

On Showing Both Commercial & Fine-Art Work: Emily Shur’s Advice

Emily Shur's photograph of Kevin Hart for Men's Health. © Emily Shur

Emily Shur’s photograph of Kevin Hart for Men’s Health. © Emily Shur

"Hotel Pool, Osaka-fu," is part of Shur's ongoing project about Japan. © Emily Shur

“Hotel Pool, Osaka-fu,” is part of Shur’s ongoing project about Japan. © Emily Shur

Emily Shur recently posted on her Tumblr about two of her images (above) being selected for American Photography 31, each shot for very different purposes. One is a portrait of the comedian Kevin Hart commissioned by Men’s Health; the other, a photograph of a hotel pool in Osaka, Japan, that is part of a long-term personal project. While building her career as a commercial and editorial photographer, Shur has also made a point of showing and promoting her personal projects at portfolio reviews, on her site and to her social media audience. She also recently published a book of her work from Japan.

In her Tumblr post, Shur made some interesting observations about how, in a photographer’s career, the pursuits of commercial work and personal work seem, at times, to be in opposition to one another. She also addressed the concern that it might be detrimental or counterproductive for “commercial photographers” to show personal, fine-art photographs that may appear to differ completely from their commissioned images.

We asked Shur for permission to publish excerpts of her blog post here, because we though it might resonate with readers of PDNPulse who aspire to be successful both commercially and with their personal work. (more…)

March 12th, 2015

The Best Drone Movies: NYC Drone Film Festival Crowns Winners

We’re still in the infancy of drone cinematography, but there’s more than enough content available now to start passing judgement on it.

The New York City Drone Film Festival wrapped up earlier this month and handed out awards, or “Dronies” in nine categories. To enter, films had to be five minutes or less with at least 50 percent of the footage captured using a drone.

A few of the winners, like “Superman with a GoPro,” may be recognizable from their days on the viral video circuit, but a few were new to us. We’ve included a few of the winning films below. The full list is here. (more…)

March 4th, 2015

World Press Photo Disqualifies Controversial Prize Winner

After questions over whether Giovanni Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about his "Dark Heart of Europe" project.

After questions over whether Giovanni Troilo staged this image, new questions arise about his “Dark Heart of Europe” project.

World Press Photo has revoked a prize awarded last month to photographer Giovanni Troilo, on the grounds that Troilo’s entry “was not in compliance with the entry rules,” according to an announcement on the World Press Photo web site. (more…)

February 26th, 2015

Iturbide, Fink, Van Houtryve to Be Honored at ICP Infinity Awards 2015

The International Center of Photography (ICP) announced their list of 2015 Infinity Award Winners this morning. The awards will be presented April 30 at a gala in New York City.

The 2015 Cornell Capa Lifetime Achievement Award will be given to Graciela Iturbide. ICP will give the award for Art to photographer Larry Fink. Tomas van Houtryve will receive this year’s award for Photojournalism.

For the first time, ICP is giving a New Media award. The award goes to Question Bridge: Black Males, an interactive exhibition created through a collaboration between Hank Willis Thomas, Chris Johnson, between Bayete Ross Smith, Kamal Sinclair and Jesse Williams.

The other Infinity Award winners are:
Publication: LaToya Ruby Frazier, The Notion of Family
Special Presentation: Mario Testino
Young Photographer: Evgenia Arbugaeva
Trustee: The Lean In Collection, by Getty Images and LeanIn.Org

The 2015 Selection Committee consisted of: Kristen Lubben, Curator, ICP; Kathy Ryan, Director of Photography, The New York Times Magazine; and Deb Willis, Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. ICP says that due to a personal conflict, Willis recused herself from the selection for the New Media prize. (Hank Willis Thomas is her son.)

Related Articles
Tomas van Houtryve Drone Essay Longest Ever Published by Harper‘s

Hank Willis Thomas on Truth, Lies and Advertising

PDN‘s 30 2014: LaToya Ruby Frazier

PDN‘s 30 2013: Evgenia Arbugaeva

February 23rd, 2015

Artist Residency for Photographers of Color: Deadline February 28

© Rose Wind Jerome. Photographer Maria Buyondo working at the Center for Photography at Woodstock on her handmade book, Where No One Can See Me.

© Rose Wind Jerome. Photographer Maria Buyondo working at the Center for Photography at Woodstock on her handmade book, Where No One Can See Me.

The artist-in-residency program at the Center for Photography at Woodstock supports artists of color working in the photographic arts who reside in the US. The residency comes with an honorarium, a stipend for food and travel, and access to the Center’s darkroom and assistants. Equally important, the AIR provides artists time to work on projects without the interruptions or distractions of everyday life. Applications for the next CPW residency program must be postmarked February 28 or earlier.

For insights into how photographers have successfully landed this prestigious residency in the past — and how they used their quiet time in upstate New York — check out our article, “Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Center for Photography at Woodstock,” and read the comments by photographers Caleb Ferguson and Maria Buyondo and CPW executive director Ariel Shanberg.

An application and submission guidelines are available on the CPW website.

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Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Center for Photography at Woodstock

13 Tips for Building Your Fine-Art Network

Donna J. Wan on the Center for Photography at Woodstock Artist Residency

February 18th, 2015

Gerd Ludwig Wins POYi’s Best Photo Book of the Year Award

Gerd Ludwig has won the 2015 POYi Best Photo Book of the Year honors for The Long Shadow of Chernobyl, his book about the lingering environmental, social, and economic consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. The award, part of the Reportage Division of the POYi competition, was announced on the POYi web site.

Ludwig’s book stands out as a case study in the challenges of photo book publishing. Not only did he pursue the project at great personal risk, as he explained in this PDN video interview last year, but he struggled to find support. He undertook two separate Kickstarter campaigns to fund his travel to Chernobyl, as well as the printing and distribution of the book.

Gerd Ludwig: The Long Shadow of Chernobyl from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

The project dates back to 1993, when Ludwig first visited Chernobyl while working on a story for National Geographic. “From that point on, I always wanted to return,” because he didn’t get as much access as he had hoped for, he told PDN last year.

He  returned in 2005, after Ukraine’s so-called Orange Revolution enabled him to gain better access. He planned to return again in 2011, on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the disaster. “The general media was not interested,” he said, so he collected funds for the 2011 trip through a Kickstarter campaign.

Ludwig left for Chernobyl while his Kickstarter campaign was still underway, and while he was there, the Fukushima nuclear disaster occurred in Japan. That stimulated more contributions to Ludwig’s Kickstarter campaign–a total of $23,316, which was almost twice his goal of $12,000. After his return, he used the extra money to publish an iPad app titled The Long Shadow of Chernobyl.

With plans to produce a printed book in time for the 30th anniversary of the disaster, in 2016, Ludwig made another trip to Chernobyl in 2013 on an $8,200 grant from Kulturwerk der VG Bild/Kunst, a German artists’ rights organization.

Meanwhile, publisher Lois Lammerhuber of Lammerhuber Editions (Austria) had approached him at the Lumix Festival of Young Photojournalism in Hanover, Germany. “He said, ‘I want to do your book,’but then the  distributor said to him, ‘Bad news doesn’t sell and Chernobyl is bad news,’” Ludwig recounted.

So he and Lammerhuber turned to Kickstarter once again in the spring of 2014, and managed to raise $45,571–well over twice his goal of $20,000–in pre-order book sales.

In a telephone interview today, Ludwig emphasized that the total funding he raised on Kickstarter “sounds like a high number” but only covered his expenses for the production and printing, and helped promote the project “It’s not a money maker,” Ludwig says. “If I count all my time, I definitely didn’t make money on this project. It’s a labor of love and an important piece of history that should be told. It’s a warning, a document to human hubris.”

Ludwig says he is continuing work on the project, and most recently had a story published in National Geographic about tourism inside the Chernobyl exclusion zone. “There are constant surprises” at Chernobyl, he says, and it stands as an archetype of nuclear disaster. “From Chernobyl, you can see what’s going to happen to these other areas” like Fukushima, he says.

Related:
Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition
Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

February 18th, 2015

Should Photogs Disqualified from World Press Be Banned? Org Says No, For Now

In the days since World Press Photo announced that 20 percent of the photographs they considered in the final rounds of the competition were disqualified for manipulation, many in the industry have called for WPP to release the offending images and make their standards more clear. In comments by jurors, WPP administrators and photographers published on the New York Times Lens Blog, 2015 competition jury chair and New York Times director of photography Michelle McNally noted that the manipulations led “many in the jury to feel we were being cheated, that they were being lied to.” World Press Photo jury secretary David Campbell notes that newspaper and wire service photographers get fired when they are caught manipulating news photos: “Narciso Contreras and Miguel Tova have lost their jobs because of manipulations that crossed the one line we can draw.”

These reactions beg the question: If World Press Photo is a reflection of the photojournalism industry, should photographers who attempted to deceive jurors—and the public—be banned from the competition? After all, newspaper and wire services have fired photographers who manipulated images.

According to World Press Photo managing director Lars Boering, the organization is not currently planning to ban any photographers who submitted manipulated images to the competition. “I might discuss that with the board and the team that is organizing the competition,” he told PDN, adding that “a lot” of the disqualified photos were cases of “clumsy” Photoshop use rather than blatant attempts to deceive competition judges.

World Press Photo rules state: “The content of an image must not be altered. Only retouching that conforms to currently accepted standards in the industry is allowed.” In her statement on Lens, McNally clarified that the manipulation the jurors disqualified included “removing or adding information to the image, for example, like toning that rendered some parts so black that entire objects disappeared from the frame. The jury—which was flexible about toning, given industry standards — could not accept processing that blatantly added or removed elements of the picture.”

The organization is very aware that manipulation accusations can deal huge blows to the careers of photojournalists, Boering says, which is why they are keeping confidential the names of photographers who were disqualified—despite calls for more transparency. “If people get caught by agencies, then they are thrown out, and I know it’s difficult for these people to get back to work or find other agencies, so that’s a serious thing,” Boering explains. “If an agency makes that decision it’s up to them because that’s their rules. We organize a competition; we care a lot about photojournalism and visual journalism, but…I don’t think we should be the ones that decide on the careers of photographers, and whether they should be ruled out of competitions with others or whether they should lose their job with their agency.”

“We’re not going to put their names out unless we think it’s really severe what they’ve done,” Boering adds. “It might be that we think about talking to them about the way they go about it.”

Boering said WPP had today sent notices to the disqualified photographers presenting their evidence and explaining their decisions. He says the organizations has received one or two responses from photographers accepting the decision.

It’s more important to WPP that this controversy sends a message to photojournalists and the industry, sparks discussion and, hopefully, a resolution, Boering says. “Technology makes a lot of things possible, but it makes it possible to find things…. The technicians that do our research, they’ve showed me several examples of things that you can do and I think it’s amazing.”

Boering says he’s heard from people at agencies and news organizations, and others in the photo industry in the past few days. World Press Photo is planning “several debates” starting on the day of the awards presentation, that he hopes will help the “find common ground with the industry to get it right.”

Related: Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize
AP Cuts Ties with Photographer Narciso Contreras Over Photoshopped Image
Photographer Fired by AP Says Decision Was Fair, But Process Wasn’t