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May 10th, 2016

Adriane Ohanesian Wins 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award

© Adriane Ohanesian. Central Darfur, Sudan – February 27, 2015: Adam Abdel, age 7, was badly burned when a bomb dropped on February 12, 2015 by a Sudanese government’s Antonov plane, landed next to his family’s home in Burgu, Central Darfur.

© Adriane Ohanesian. Central Darfur, Sudan – February 27, 2015: Adam Abdel, age 7, was badly burned when a bomb dropped on February 12, 2015 by a Sudanese government’s Antonov plane, landed next to his family’s home in Burgu, Central Darfur.

American photojournalist Adriane Ohanesian is the recipient of the 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) announced today. The $20,000 award, which “celebrates the courage of women photojournalists who tell vital stories from countries and communities around the world through pictures,” is given in honor of Anja Niedringhaus, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Associated Press photographer who was killed while covering the elections in Afghanistan in 2014.

Ohanesian, a freelance photographer who is based in Nairobi, Kenya, has documented civil war in South Sudan and conflicts in Darfur and Somalia, among other stories. Earlier this year, Ohanesian won a World Press Photo Award for her photograph of a boy in Darfur who was badly burned when a bomb landed next to his family home in rebel-held territory.

The jury for the Niedringhaus Award praised Ohanesian’s “evocative images and tenacious dedication to documenting the effect of conflict on citizens in perilous regions,” according to a statement. “Her perceptive, compassionate eye offers an extraordinarily personal glimpse into places the global community may not otherwise see.”

© Adriane Ohanesian. Central Darfur, Sudan – March 4, 2015: Members of the rebel group, the Sudan Liberation Army, led by Abdul Wahid (SLA-AW), defend a mountain from the Sudanese government forces in Central Darfur.

© Adriane Ohanesian. Central Darfur, Sudan – March 4, 2015: Members of the rebel group, the Sudan Liberation Army, led by Abdul Wahid (SLA-AW), defend a mountain from the Sudanese government forces in Central Darfur.

Jurors for the award included Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Carol Guzy; AP director of photography Santiago Lyon; New York Times director of photography and assistant managing editor Michele McNally; journalist and former editor of CNNPolitics.com Bryan Monroe; and photojournalist and VII photo agency co-founder Ron Haviv.

Lynsey Addario and Paula Bronstein received honorable mentions. All three photographers will be honored at a reception in Washington, D.C. on June 9th, hosted by the German Ambassador to the U.S. Peter Wittig and Mrs. Huberta von Voss-Wittig.

The IWMF established the annual Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award, now in its second year, with funding from the Howard G. Buffet Foundation. American photojournalist Heidi Levine won the 2015 award.

Related:
Heidi Levine Wins First Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award
AP Photographer Anja Niedringhaus Killed in Afghanistan

May 4th, 2016

Suzy Lake Wins $50k Scotiabank 2016 Photography Award

Suzy Lake, Forever Young, 2000

Forever Young, 2000. Photos © Suzy Lake.

Suzy Lake has been named as the winner of the sixth annual Scotiabank Photography Award and has been awarded a $50,000 cash prize. The award also includes a solo exhibition at the Ryerson Image Center in 2017 and a book of her work to be published by Steidl.

Lake’s work explores performative, feminist and self-identification themes and, “her influence has spread throughout several generations of artists, both nationally and internationally,” said Edward Burtynsky, chair of the Scotiabank Photography Award jury, in a prepared statement announcing her nomination for the prize.

The Extended Goodbye. Photo © Suzy Lake.

The Extended Goodbye. Photo © Suzy Lake.

The two other finalists, Pascal Grandmaison and Jayce Salloum, will receive cash prizes of $10,000 each.

The jurors for this years’ awards were Nova Scotia College of Art & Design professor Robert Bean, deputy director of the Canadian Cultural Centre Catherine Bédard, and Robert Enright, a professor of art at University of Guelph, Ontario.

The award is meant to honor the work of contemporary Canadian photographers and provide support to a mid to late career artist. Previous winners include Angela Grauerholz, Mark Ruwedel, Stan Douglas, Arnaud Maggs and Lynne Cohen.

Related Links:

Mark Ruwedel Wins 2014 Scotiabank Photography Award

Edward Burtynsky Establishes Photo Book Grant with Prize Money

April 28th, 2016

Bassam Khabieh Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal for Syria Coverage

The body of a dead man is seen next to blood stains at a field hospital, after what activists said were air and missile strikes, in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, Syria December 13, 2015. Douma in Syria, an area controlled by rebels fighting to topple President Bashar al-Assad, has been shelled continuously for the past three years. The injured are taken to basements and shelters transformed into field hospitals run by medical staff who have stayed in the battered neighborhood of Damascus.

The body of a dead man is seen next to blood stains at a field hospital, after what activists said were air and missile strikes, in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, Syria December 13, 2015. © Bassam Khabieh / Reuters

At an event this evening in New York City, The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) will award the 2015 Robert Capa Gold Medal for photography to Reuters photographer Bassam Khabieh for his coverage of the Syrian civil war, the organization has announced. The award is given for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise.” In grisly images that depict dead and injured men, and wounded children, in a makeshift field hospital in Damascus, Khabieh’s images show the brutal reality of the war in Syria, now in its fifth year.

The Overseas Press Club statement about the story, “Field Hospital Damascus,” notes the danger of living and working in Syria as a journalist. A Syria native who left an information technology career to photograph the war, Khabieh began working for Reuters in 2013. “Further setting this entry apart from the others was the courage and enterprise required not only to cover but live day in and day out in one of the most hostile and unpredictable environments on the planet,” the OPC said in a statement. More than 100 journalists have been killed in Syria since the start of the civil war in March, 2011.

Stephen Dupont will receive The Olivier Rebbot Award, which honors “photographic reporting from abroad in magazines or books,” for Generation AK: The Afghanistan Wars, 1993-2012 (Steidl, 2015).

The John Faber Award, which recognizes “reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services,” will go to Mauricio Lima, Sergey Ponomarev, Tyler Hicks and Daniel Etter for their coverage of the migrant crisis for The New York Times. The photographers recently won a Breaking News Photography Pulitzer Prize for the same work.

Another New York Times-published story, Daniel Berehulak’s “High in the Himalayas, A Search After the Nepal Earthquake Yields Grim Results,” will receive The Feature Photography Award for “photography published in any medium on an international theme.”

The OPC will livestream the awards event here beginning at 7:30 EST.

Related:
Marcus Bleasdale Wins 2014 Robert Capa Gold Medal
Tyler Hicks Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

April 27th, 2016

Heidi Swanson and Eater Honored in 2016 James Beard Foundation Awards

Eater-Screen-Shot

A screenshot from Eater’s “One Night: Kachka” feature, which earned the publication the Visual Storytelling honor in the 2016 James Beard Foundation Awards.

The James Beard Foundation announced the winners of its annual Books, Broadcast and Journalism awards on April 26. Cookbook author and photographer Heidi Swanson won top honors for the Photography category for her book Near & Far: Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel. The publication Eater was also honored in the Visual Storytelling category for its online feature “One Night: Kachka.”

Swanson was one of three nominees in the photography category.  Also nominated were Fire and Ice: Classic Nordic Cooking, photographed by Stefan Wettainen, and Root to Leaf: A Southern Chef Cooks Through the Seasons, photographed by John Kernick.

Eater’s Visual Storytelling honor was awarded for the feature’s excellence in photography and graphic design. Other nominees in the category included “How to Make the World’s Best Cheeseburger, Using Magic” from Epicurious and “Smells the Same” from the food blog Lucky Peach.

The James Beard Foundation is a non-profit based in New York City that organizes lectures, workshops, events, and other educational initiatives around the country to promote the exploration of American culinary history and culture. All the James Beard Foundation honorees can be found at JamesBeard.org.

Related articles

Good Food: Romas Foord, Ditte Isager, Food & Wine Honored in 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards

Katie Quinn Davies and Gather Journal Win 2013 James Beard Awards for Food Photography

April 22nd, 2016

Aaron Vincent Elkaim Wins $20K Alexia Foundation Grant for 2016

March 29, 2014. A group of boys climb a tree on the Xingu River by the city of Altamira, Brazil. One third of the city will be permanently flooded by the nearby Belo Monte Dam. Photo © Aaron Vincent Elkaim.

A group of boys climb a tree on the Xingu River by the city of Altamira, Brazil on March 29, 2014. One third of the city will be permanently flooded by the nearby Belo Monte Dam. Photo © Aaron Vincent Elkaim.

Toronto, Canada-based photographer Aaron Vincent Elkaim has won the $20,000 Professional Grant from the Alexia Foundation, the organization announced this morning. Elkaim received the grant for his project “Where the River Runs Through,” which examines the consequences of Brazil’s major hydroelectric expansion on the ecosystems, communities and industries within the Amazon Rainforest.

The winner of the first place Student Grant is Ryerson University senior Nathaniel Brunt for his project “#Shaheed,” a study of the war in Kashmir, the men fighting in it, and the changing relationship between technology and the representation of conflict. His prize is a semester at Syracuse University to further his goal of earning a PhD and to produce his project into a book.

Finalists for the Professional Grant were Adriane Ohanesian for “The Last Lives, Rebel Darfur,” Brendan Hoffman for “Brotherland: War in Ukraine,” Krisanne Johnson for “Post Apartheid Youth,” and Asa Sjöström for “Moldove Silent Land.”

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala received a Judges Special Recognition award for his project “Colombia, The Parallel State,” which documents the reality of a civilian population who live in a hidden Colombia that only knows the reality of sixty years of war.

José Márquez of Brooks Institute, Gabriela Arp of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Sarah Blesener of The International Center of Photography, and Nick Wagner of Western Kentucky University have been awarded Student Award of Excellence Grants.

Judges for the 2016 competition included past Alexia Professional Grant recipients Teru Kuwayama, Darcy Padilla and Ami Vitale.

The mission of the Alexia Foundation is to promote photojournalism through scholarships and grants to bring attention to social injustice and to promote cross-cultural understanding. The foundation was established in 1991 by the family of Alexia Tsairis, a Syracuse University student who died in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.

Related stories:
Paolo Marchetti Wins $20K 2015 Alexia Foundation Grant
Aaron Vincent Elkaim Named Finalist In 2015 FotoVisura Grant

April 21st, 2016

TIS Books Grant Shows Support for Hardworking Photography Adjuncts

Book publisher TIS has launched a grant for adjunct photography instructors. Called the “Essential Non-Essentials Grant,” TIS created the $1,000 award in recognition of hardworking adjuncts, who often work multiple teaching jobs, sometimes in different states, in order to earn a decent living.

“One of our co-founders is part of this army of road dog educators and we understand the struggles that adjunct professors face while trying to support their livelihood and studio practice while also teaching a new generation of artists and makers with no security or benefits,” TIS said in a statement announcing the grant.

As has been widely reported, colleges and universities have in recent years been replacing tenure track teaching positions—in all areas of study, not just the arts—with lower-paid adjunct positions. Adjuncts usually earn between $2,500 and $5,000 per class. For a story about adjunct instructors published in the January 2015 issue of PDN, some adjuncts reported traveling to as many as three states per week to fill their teaching schedules.

The TIS grant aims to provide a bit of extra money to these teachers to use however they wish. The application fee is $7, and they’ve streamlined the application process, asking for seven images, a 300-word statement and a CV. TIS is accepting applications through June 1st, and will announce the winner June 7th.

Go here for more information and to apply.

Related:
Are Art School Hiring Practices Hurting Prospects For MFA Photo Students?
A Part Time Future: Adjunct Teaching Dynamics in Three Parts

April 18th, 2016

2016 Photography Pulitzers Go to The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and Thompson Reuters

Migrants arrive by Turkish cruise boat near village of Skala, Lesbos island Greece, Monday November, 16, 2015. The Turkish boat owner delivered some 150 persons to the Greek coast and tried to escape back to Turkey, he was arrested later in Turkish waters. Photo © Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times.

Migrants arrive by Turkish cruise boat near village of Skala, Lesbos island Greece, Monday November, 16, 2015.The Turkish boat owner delivered some 150 persons to the Greek coast and tried to escape back to Turkey, he was arrested later in Turkish waters. Photo © Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times.

Two photo teams have won Pulitzer Prizes for Breaking News Photography this year: one prize went to Mauricio Lima, Sergey Ponomarev, Tyler Hicks and Daniel Etter of The New York Times and the second went to the photography staff of Thompson Reuters. The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography went to Jessica Rinaldi of The Boston Globe. The prizes were announced this afternoon at the Columbia University School of Journalism in New York.

Lima, Ponomarev, Hicks and Etter were recognized for their work that captures the “resolve of refugees and the perils of their journeys, as well as the struggles of host countries to take them in,” according to the Pulitzer citation.

Thompson Reuters has been recognized for its photographs that follow migrant refugees hundreds of miles across uncertain boundaries to unknown destinations, the Pulitzer Board noted.

© Jessica Rinaldi for The Boston Globe

© Jessica Rinaldi for The Boston Globe

Rinaldi won the Feature Photography prize for her story about a boy who “strives to find his footing after abuse by those he trusted.” The finalist for the award was the Photography Staff of The Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina.

The Pulitzer Committee says that it received more 1,100 journalism entries for this year’s prizes.

Related: 2015 Photography Pulitzers Go to Daniel Berehulak, St. Louis Post-Dispatch Staff (for PDN subscribers)

How Winning a Pulitzer Changed Deanne Fitzmaurice’s Career

Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

April 15th, 2016

How Winning Three Pulitzers Changed William Snyder’s Career

From William Snyder's Pulitzer Prize-winning story about subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. ©William Snyder

From William Snyder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning story about subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. ©William Snyder

In anticipation of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize announcements on Monday, we talked to photographers who have won in the past about how the prize affected their careers. Today, William Snyder talks about his experience as a three-time Pulitzer winner during his tenure as a staff photographer at the Dallas Morning News. In 1989, he shared the prize for Explanatory Journalism with two colleagues. In 1991, he won the Feature Photography prize for his story about children living in subhuman conditions in Romanian orphanages. He shared the 1993 prize for Spot News with colleague Ken Geiger for their coverage of the 1992 Summer Olympics. Snyder also led the Dallas Morning News photo team that won 2006 Breaking News Photography prize for coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Snyder is currently chair of the photojournalism program at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

PDN: What went through your mind the first time you won a Pulitzer?
William Snyder: I was really excited. It’s one of those things you dream of. My little tiny disappointment was that it wasn’t in photography, but that’s just being selfish.

PDN: How did the subsequent wins compare?
WS: The [second] one was for a story I did on Romanian orphans that was near and dear to my heart, that I really worked hard on, and it was all my story. I could die happy. I felt like I accomplished something.

William Snyder, in his "lucky" Pulitzer shirt, celebrates in 2006 with the Dallas Morning News photo team that won the prize for Breaking News Photography. ©Mei-Chun Jau/Dallas Morning News

William Snyder, in his “lucky” Pulitzer shirt, celebrates with the Dallas Morning News photo team that won the 2006 prize for Breaking News Photography. ©Mei-Chun Jau/Dallas Morning News

PDN: Does winning the Pulitzer go to your head–not your head, of course, but a photographer’s head?
WS: On the eve of winning the first one, I was talking to the executive editor. He said to me, “Grace and humility William, after this happens.” I said, “If you’re worried about that, I can’t be any bigger of an asshole than I already am.”

We all know stories that have been great, and photographs that have been fantastic, that haven’t won. Is there luck involved? Are there things that are out of your control that are involved? Absolutely.  What I learned was:  You don’t rest on your laurels. You’ve got to keep working, day in and day out.

PDN: Is there a burden to winning?
WS: I’ve heard of people who win once and they’re frozen, because they’re so afraid that everyone’s going to be looking at them to produce something of Pulitzer quality every time they walk out the gate. There’s only a burden if you let there be a burden.

PDN: Did you always dream of winning the Pulitzer? Was that the Holy Grail for you?
WS: It wasn’t the Holy Grail, but it was pretty close. I never won Photographer of the Year in POY. This is the sick thing about me: I feel incomplete because I never won that. That should tell you about me: I was never satisfied. That’s the kind of person I am. [As journalists] we want to do great work, but we want the medals, because the medals live even longer than the great work.

PDN: What do you mean?
WS: There are people who you know as “Pulitzer Prize winner” and you have never seen their work. You’ve never read their book, seen their play, heard their music, but you see that phrase, and you know they’re good.

PDN: Is the Pulitzer as coveted as it used to be, after the decimation of the newspaper business? Does it have the cache that it used to?
WS: I think more so now. [Now] it’s difficult to win for a picture you happen upon. Most Pulitzers now are for involved stories, whether they’re news or features, right? So if you win a Pulitzer now, you’ve put in the time. You’ve done a great story. In an age when many media companies say “good enough is good enough,” the Pulitzer is still the high water mark, the beacon.

PDN: Did anything change for you after you won?
WS: The first one, absolutely not.

PDN: How about the second one?
WS: There were a ton of offers for lectures, workshops and freelance gigs. My boss just said, “Do ‘em.” Also it was the main reason I was accepted as a Michigan Journalism Fellow (now called the Knight-Wallace Fellowships) and why I was chosen as the inaugural James Burke Fellow.

Things really changed after I won the third Pulitzer. My boss and I got along better. There wasn’t this constant conflict. I just wanted to be able to work. That was the best thing about it: Just to be able to do the work, and be supported. From 1993 to 1998, when I stopped shooting, those were the four or five best years of my career because I was supported and listened to. Did I get what I wanted all the time? Absolutely not.

PDN: Why did you give up the shooting?
WS: There was no one reason. I was traveling a lot back then. I was getting burnout, and I had two young boys I wanted to see grow up and spend some time with. I got to the point where I saw nothing on the horizon—no story that I wanted to do–and my boss was pushing me to be an editor.

PDN: What’s your advice to this year’s Pulitzer winners?
WS: Enjoy it, and then go back to work. If you watch the end of Patton [1971 Oscar winner for Best Picture], he’s talking about how in the old days, there’d be this great parade, and the triumphant warrior would come in with the adjutant standing behind [him], holding the golden crown over his head, and whispering in his ear, “All glory is fleeting.” And that’s it: Enjoy it, and then you gotta go back to work.

Related:
How Winning a Pulitzer Changed Deanne Fitzmaurice’s Career

April 14th, 2016

Bryan Denton Wins Fifth Annual Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund Award

American photojournalist Bryan Denton has won the fifth annual $20,000 Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund (CHF) Award, and fellow photojournalist Kiana Hayeri has also been awarded the $5,000 emerging photojournalist grant, Getty Images announced today. The awards will be presented at a reception at the Aperture Gallery in New York on May 4.

Bryan Denton for The New York Times

© Bryan Denton for The New York Times

The CHF award was established to honor the work and celebrate the legacy of photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed in April 2011 while on assignment covering the Libyan civil war. The four previous CHF Award winners were Kevin Frayer, Daniel Berehulak, Andrea Bruce, and Tomás Munita.

Denton has been based in Lebanon, Beirut since 2006 and has completed assignments in the Middle East, Africa, South East Asia and Afghanistan for The New York Times, Newsweek, TIME, The Wall Street Journal and more. He was previously selected as a finalist by the CHF in 2013.

“I was lucky enough to have been friends with Chris, which makes this accolade a bittersweet motivation to keep pushing my work forward, and to do so with the kindness, grace and spirit that Chris embodied both in his work and in life,” Denton said in a prepared statement.

Hayeri, who was born in Iran and migrated to Toronto as a teenager, won the emerging photojournalist grant for work exploring topics such as migration and adolescence.  Her work has appeared in publications including Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Monocle, and The Washington Post.

Jurors for the 2016 CHF awards included Getty Images vice president of news Pancho Bernasconi, New York Times photographer Todd Heisler, freelance photojournalist Jeff Swensen and CHF board president Christina Piaia, who was engaged to Hondros at the time of his death.

Related Stories:

Kevin Frayer Wins Fourth Annual Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Chris Hondros’s Testament

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

April 13th, 2016

David Bailey, Zanele Muholi Among Honorees at ICP Infinity Awards 2016

Mick Jagger. © David Bailey

Mick Jagger. © David Bailey

 

The International Center of Photography (ICP ) honored their 2016 Infinity Award winners at a gala in New York City on April 11.

David Bailey, the fashion and portrait photographer, received the 2016 Infinity Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award for Documentary & Photojournalism went to South African photographer/activist Zanele Muholi. The Art award was given to Walid Raad.

For the second year in a row, ICP named a winner for Online Platform & New Media. The award was given to Jonathan Harris, artist and engineer, and Gregor Hohmuth, an artist and computer scientist, who co-created the creators of Network Effect, a site that examines “human life on the Internet.”

The other Infinity Awards winners were:
Artist’s Book: Fire in Cairo by Matthew Connors
Critical Writing & Research: Susan Schuppli
Trustee Award: Artur Walther, The Walther Collection

Information on, and short videos about, each of the winners can be found at http://www.icp.org/infinity-awards.

Related articles
Iturbide, Fink, Van Houtryve to Be Honored at ICP Infinity Awards 2015

Zanele Muholi on Fighting Homophobic Violence with Portraiture (for PDN subscribers)

Bruce Weber on David Bailey, Diane Arbus, Lisette Model and Romance

PDN Legends Online: David Bailey