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April 14th, 2016

Bryan Denton Wins Fifth Annual Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund Award

American photojournalist Bryan Denton has won the fifth annual $20,000 Getty Images Chris Hondros Fund (CHF) Award, and fellow photojournalist Kiana Hayeri has also been awarded the $5,000 emerging photojournalist grant, Getty Images announced today. The awards will be presented at a reception at the Aperture Gallery in New York on May 4.

Bryan Denton for The New York Times

© Bryan Denton for The New York Times

The CHF award was established to honor the work and celebrate the legacy of photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed in April 2011 while on assignment covering the Libyan civil war. The four previous CHF Award winners were Kevin Frayer, Daniel Berehulak, Andrea Bruce, and Tomás Munita.

Denton has been based in Lebanon, Beirut since 2006 and has completed assignments in the Middle East, Africa, South East Asia and Afghanistan for The New York Times, Newsweek, TIME, The Wall Street Journal and more. He was previously selected as a finalist by the CHF in 2013.

“I was lucky enough to have been friends with Chris, which makes this accolade a bittersweet motivation to keep pushing my work forward, and to do so with the kindness, grace and spirit that Chris embodied both in his work and in life,” Denton said in a prepared statement.

Hayeri, who was born in Iran and migrated to Toronto as a teenager, won the emerging photojournalist grant for work exploring topics such as migration and adolescence.  Her work has appeared in publications including Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Monocle, and The Washington Post.

Jurors for the 2016 CHF awards included Getty Images vice president of news Pancho Bernasconi, New York Times photographer Todd Heisler, freelance photojournalist Jeff Swensen and CHF board president Christina Piaia, who was engaged to Hondros at the time of his death.

Related Stories:

Kevin Frayer Wins Fourth Annual Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund Award

Chris Hondros’s Testament

Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros: Remembering Them As They Lived

April 13th, 2016

David Bailey, Zanele Muholi Among Honorees at ICP Infinity Awards 2016

Mick Jagger. © David Bailey

Mick Jagger. © David Bailey

 

The International Center of Photography (ICP ) honored their 2016 Infinity Award winners at a gala in New York City on April 11.

David Bailey, the fashion and portrait photographer, received the 2016 Infinity Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award for Documentary & Photojournalism went to South African photographer/activist Zanele Muholi. The Art award was given to Walid Raad.

For the second year in a row, ICP named a winner for Online Platform & New Media. The award was given to Jonathan Harris, artist and engineer, and Gregor Hohmuth, an artist and computer scientist, who co-created the creators of Network Effect, a site that examines “human life on the Internet.”

The other Infinity Awards winners were:
Artist’s Book: Fire in Cairo by Matthew Connors
Critical Writing & Research: Susan Schuppli
Trustee Award: Artur Walther, The Walther Collection

Information on, and short videos about, each of the winners can be found at http://www.icp.org/infinity-awards.

Related articles
Iturbide, Fink, Van Houtryve to Be Honored at ICP Infinity Awards 2015

Zanele Muholi on Fighting Homophobic Violence with Portraiture (for PDN subscribers)

Bruce Weber on David Bailey, Diane Arbus, Lisette Model and Romance

PDN Legends Online: David Bailey

April 13th, 2016

How Winning a Pulitzer Changed Deanne Fitzmaurice’s Career

Saleh draws an airplane dropping bombs, after nurses taped a felt-tipped pen to his arm in an effort to soothe him. ©Deanne Fitzmaurice

Saleh draws an airplane dropping bombs, after nurses taped a felt-tipped pen to his arm in an effort to soothe him. ©Deanne Fitzmaurice

The 2016 Pulitzer Prize winners will be announced on Monday, April 18, marking the 100th awarding of the prizes since they were initiated in 1917. We recently asked photojournalist Deanne Fitzmaurice how winning the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature photography has affected her career. Now a contributor to Sports Illustrated, ESPN the Magazine, National Geographic and other publications, Fitzmaurice was a staff photographer at the San Francisco Chronicle when she won her Pulitzer. The story she won for was about an Iraqi boy named Saleh who was undergoing treatment at an Oakland hospital after he was nearly killed by an explosion in Iraq.

PDN: What went through your mind when you heard your name read?
Deanne Fitzmaurice: it was complete disbelief. I had been a staff photographer at the Chronicle for maybe 15 years. I thought the Pulitzer was so far out of my reach. But it was a story I felt was so important for people to see, and winning the Pulitzer brought it to a much larger audience.

PDN: What immediate effect did winning the Pulitzer have on your career?
DF: The Chronicle pretty much said, What do you want to work on? It gave me independence to work on stories I really cared about. But in some ways, life was back to normal two weeks later. I was out on assignment for the real estate section, photographing a guy who was up on a ladder. He goes, “Gee, wouldn’t it be funny if I fell off the ladder? You’d probably end up winning a Pulitzer if I did.” And I said, “You’re not going to believe this, but a couple weeks ago I actually did win the Pulitzer.” I’m sure he didn’t believe me.

Deanne Fitzmaurice hears she has won a Pulitzer Prize, April 4, 2005. ©AP Photo/San Francisco Chronicle, Brant Ward

Deanne Fitzmaurice, reacting to the news that she had won a Pulitzer Prize, April 4, 2005. ©AP Photo/San Francisco Chronicle, Brant Ward

PDN: Does it go to your head? Don’t you think, “Why am I shooting these stupid real estate assignments? I’ve won the Pulitzer!”
DF: I didn’t want the other staff photographers to think I was a prima donna, so I wanted to do those ordinary, everyday assignments. Of course, I wanted to do some high level, in-depth projects as well.

There was another funny story about people’s reactions. I was at a wedding, the priest had heard I won the Pulitzer, and he was telling everyone. After the ceremony, he got really drunk, and well into the reception, he’s still telling people about my award, but at that point, he’s telling people I had won the Nobel Peace Prize.

PDN: The Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize are among the few prizes you get to wear for the rest of your life, like: “I’m a  Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer.”
DF: Right, and sometimes it’s awkward–you feel weird doing that, like you’re full of yourself, but at the same time, you’re proud of it and it’s important.

PDN: What effect has it had on your career in the long run?
DF: I stayed at the San Francisco Chronicle as a staff photographer for three years after winning. A lot of opportunities came to me, and I became really busy.

PDN: Who was calling? What kinds of projects?
DF: There was a Pulitzer exhibit in some museum in Minneapolis. Some [art] buyers happened to see it, and they were looking for a photographer to work a project for Target. It was a commercial project but they wanted it shot in a photojournalistic style for Target. So they contacted me, and I got that project, and that was great. I was working on weekends doing things like that. I reached a point where I was too busy, and I was making a decision: Do I stay as a staff photographer, or take this moment to try to make it as a freelancer? I spent about six months of sleepless nights. I thought, photographers are getting laid off, the industry is changing, and I’m thinking of walking away from a perfectly good job. But I thought, If I’m ever going to do this, now is the time. I think I would have regretted if I didn’t, so I took a chance. I was scared to death, walking away. If I had stayed at the Chronicle, my life wouldn’t have changed that much. By going independent, it has given me lots of options and lots of opportunities.

PDN: Does winning the Pulitzer carry any kind of burden?
DF: After I won the Pulitzer, I was putting pressure on myself, saying, “You need to continue working at this level.” I didn’t want to be a one-hit wonder. The feeling that I could produce that kind of work, I wanted to keep doing that.

PDN: What’s your advice to photographers about how to make the most of it if they win?
DF: When you win, your phone is going to start ringing like crazy, your inbox is going to fill up and there are going to be lots of opportunities to to go out and talk about your work and your process. It’s easy for it to become a distraction. After I won, I spent the following year doing speaking engagements and other things related to that project. It was a great honor and privilege, but then I felt like: enough talking, just start producing some work.

Related:
Photography Pulitzers Go to Daniel Berehulak, St. Louis Post-Dispatch Staff (for PDN subscribers)
Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography (for PDN subscribers)
Instagram: @deannefitzmaurice

April 6th, 2016

2016 Guggenheim Fellowships Announced

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has announced the recipients of their 2016 fellowship grants. Eleven photographer are among the 178 fellows who work in the humanities, creative arts, social sciences and natural sciences. The fellows were selected from a field of nearly 3,000 applicants. Guggenheim Fellows receive grants of varying but undisclosed amounts to pursue a proposed project.

The 2016 Guggenheim Fellows in photography are:
Dru Donovan
Hasan Elahi
McNair Evans
Lyle Ashton Harris
Matthew Jensen
Alex Majoli
Eileen Neff
Louie Palu
Robin Schwartz
Lida Suchy
Yvonne Venegas

Another photographer, Carlos Javier Ortiz, received a fellowship for a new video project.

The Fellowships are considered “midcareer” grants. They are awarded to artists and scholars who have “already demonstrated capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts,” according to the Foundation.

Related:
11 Photographers Win 2015 Guggenheim Fellowships
McNair Evans: Confessions for a Son
Stan Douglas Wins $118,000 Hasselblad Award for 2016
Mira Mexico: Louie Palu’s Conceptual Project About the War on Drugs

April 4th, 2016

Video Pick: Magnus Wennman Pushes Boundaries with “Fatima’s Drawings”

FATIMA’S DRAWINGS from Magnus Wennman on Vimeo.

Among three finalists for the World Press Photo short form multimedia prize is Magnus Wennman’s outstanding 5-1/2 minute video called “Fatima’s Drawings.” His “Where the Children Sleep” project was widely published last year, and “Fatima’s Drawings” is a continuation of his work documenting the plight of refugee children from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. The video features a five-year-old Syrian refugee in Sweden, recounting (in a voiceover) the trauma and loss she experienced in Syria and while fleeing to Europe. It’s an example of spare, exquisite filmmaking, with care and attention to all the creative and technical details, from the storyboarding and shooting, to the sound recording and mixing, to the atmospheric hue of the lighting. It also includes animation: Wennman shows Fatima by the light of a window, making stick-figure drawings of scenes from her past. One shows her playing with the best friend she left behind in Idlib, Syria; another shows airplanes bombing her old neighborhood. The drawings suddenly come to life as the camera lingers overhead. Some purists might argue the technique strains the limits of journalism, but Wennman’s video adds up to more than the sum of its individual parts, and documentary storytelling doesn’t get much better than this.

Related:
Video Pick: “Denali,” Film about Photographer Ben Moon and His Dog, Goes Viral
Video Pick: Chris Jordan’s “Midway,” on Beauty in Environmental Activism

March 25th, 2016

Eli Durst Wins 2016 Aperture Portfolio Prize

Photographer Eli Durst has won the 2016 Aperture Portfolio Prize for his series “In Asmara.” The prize, which includes $3,000 and an exhibition at Aperture Gallery in New York, is intended to identify trends in contemporary photography and highlight artists whose work deserves greater recognition, according to Aperture. Past winners include LaToya Ruby Frazier, Michal Chelbin, and Bryan Schutmaat.

From Eli Durst's series, "In Asmara," Aperture Portfolio Prize winner.

From Eli Durst’s series, “In Asmara.” Photo © Eli Durst.

“In Asmara” documents Durst’s time visiting the capital city of East African country Eritrea. The city is renowned for its large collection of intact modernist buildings, however, Durst’s series documents the life going on around the buildings—a trash dump, a table set for dinner, the backseat of a car.

Runners up for this year’s prize are Bill Durgin, Sean Thomas Foulkes and RaMell Ross. Their work will be featured on Aperture’s website. They will also have the opportunity to participate in the Aperture Foundation limited-edition print program.

Durst grew up in Texas and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2011. After college he assisted photographer Joel Meyerowitz and worked at the fine-art printing studio Griffin Editions. He is currently pursuing an MFA in photography at the Yale School of Art.

 

March 17th, 2016

Japanese Photographer Daisuke Yokota Wins €20,000 Foam Paul Huf Award

Untitled, 2015, From the series Color Photographs © Daisuke Yokota / Courtesy G/P Gallery

Untitled, 2015, From the series Color Photographs © Daisuke Yokota / Courtesy G/P Gallery

Foam, the Amsterdam-based photography museum, has awarded the 10th annual Paul Huf Award to Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota. The award includes an exhibition at Foam, publication in the organization’s magazine and a €20,000 ($22,642) prize. Named for Dutch photographer Paul Huf, who helped establish Foam, the award supports emerging photographers of any nationality under the age of 35.

“Yokota has established a formidable reputation as a young artist who has the ability to take photography forward into ever more original directions; from prints, to artist’s books, installations, and collaborative performance, and always with a distinctive and unmistakable visual language,” said Tate London’s Simon Baker, chairman of the jury, in a statement.

The other jurors were: curator and editor Joshua Chuang; Lucy Conticello, Director of Photography at M, Le Monde; Felix Hoffmann, chief curator at C/O Berlin; and Thyago Nogueira, the head of contemporary photography at Moreira Salles Institute and editor ZUM photography Magazine.

The jurors selected Daisuke from a pool of 97 nominees from 29 countries.

Previous Paul Huf award-winners include Taryn Simon, Mikhael Subotzky, Pieter Hugo, Léonie Hampton-Purchas, Alexander Gronsky, Raphaël Dallaporta, Alex Prager, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Daniel Gordon and Momo Okabe.

Related: Gideon Mendel Wins $50,000 Pollock Prize for Creativity
An Interview with Foam’s Marcel Feil (Login required)
Momo Okabe Wins the Foam Paul Huf Award 2015

March 16th, 2016

Gideon Mendel Wins $50,000 Pollock Prize for Creativity

Gideon Mendel has won the inaugural Pollock Prize for Creativity, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation announced today. The South African photographer, who for the last nine years has been working on an ongoing project about climate change called “Drowning World,” has been awarded a $50,000 cash prize.

Jeff and Tracey Waters, Staines-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK. From Gideon Mendel for Pollock Prize

“Jeff and Tracey Waters, Staines-upon-Thames, Surrey, UK,” from “Drowning World.” Photo © Gideon Mendel.

The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, which safeguards the artistic legacies of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, initiated the Pollock Prize to support outstanding mid-career artists working in painting, sculpture, works on paper and printmaking, or photography.

“It’s a huge honor to receive this award named after Jackson Pollock, an artist I’ve always loved for his freedom in breaking barriers. Because my own work increasingly straddles the border between art, documentation and activism, it’s all the more important to me that the prize is given not for photography but for creativity in general,” Mendel said in a statement released by the foundation.

Mendel has previously covered the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa and elsewhere. His work has been exhibited in museums and shows including the ICP Triennial in New York and published in magazines including National Geographic, Rolling Stone and more.

The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, has made more than 4,100 grants to individual artists in 77 countries, says foundation chairman and CEO Charles Bergman. The grants have totaled more than $65 million. The new Pollock Prize for Creativity will be given annually by a foundation jury based on the recommendations of a network of nominators.

March 15th, 2016

Aragón Renuncio Wins $120K Grand Prize in International Photo Contest

Antonio Aragón Renuncio's grand-prize winning image, shot in Togo. ©Antonio Aragón Renuncio

$120,000 grand prize winner of the 2016 Hamdan International Photography Award competition. ©Antonio Aragón Renuncio

Antonio Aragón Renuncio of Spain has won the $120,000 grand prize in the Hamdan International Photography Award (HIPA) competition in Dubai. The theme of the competition was “Happiness.” Aragón won the prize for an image of happy kids chasing motorcycle tires outside of an NGO clinic in Togo. Winners were announced yesterday at a ceremony in Dubai.

The HIPA competition, now in its fifth year, is sponsored by Dubai’s crown prince Sheikh Hamdan Bin Mohammed Al Maktoum, a 33-year-old photography enthusiast. Previous HIPA grand prize winners include Anurag Kumar of India (2015); Fuyang Zhou of China (2014); and Osama Al Zubaidi of United Arab Emirates (2013).

Winners of $25,000 first-place prizes in other 2016 contest categories were Francisco Negroni Rodgriquez of Chile (General category); Khaled Al Sabbah of the Palestinian Territory (Father and Son category); Hameed Husain Isa of Bahrain (Happiness category); and Steve Winter of the US (Wildlife category). No first place winner was announced in the Wildlife category, but Lynn Emery of the UK won second prize.

Organizers announced second, third, fourth and fifth place awards in each category, with prizes of $12,000, $10,00, $8,000 and $6,000, respectively.

Special awards included the $20,000 Photography Appreciation Award, which went to Oscar Mitri; and the $25,000 Photographic Research/Report Award, won by Don McCullin.

Organizers said more than 80,000 photographs were submitted for the competition. The entries were judged by David Maitland, Frans Lanting, Maggie Steber, Michael Lohmann, Michael Pritchard, Michael Yamashita, Monica Allende, Phillip S. Block and Stephen Mayes.

More information about the competition is available online at the HIPA website.

March 9th, 2016

POPCAP’16 Prize for Contemporary African Photography Winners Announced

© Sabelo Mlangeni  From “Isivumelano: An Agreement, 2003-2014,” his series on weddings in South African townships, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland.

© Sabelo Mlangeni
From “Isivumelano: An Agreement, 2003-2014,” his series on weddings in South African townships, Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland.

Nicolas Henry, Jason Larkin, Sabelo Mlangeni, Thom Pierce and Julia Runge have been named the winners of the POPCAP’16 Prize for Contemporary African Photography. The announcement was made March 6 by piclet.org, the online directory of photographers’ portfolios which organizes the juried prize.

The prize honors series that were taken in an African country or deal with a diaspora of an African country. Only one of the winners, Sabelo Mlangeni, a South African, was born on the African continent. Pierce, who lives in Cape Town, South Africa, was born on Jersey;  Larkin, born and raised in London, made his project, “Waiting,” from 2013-2015 while living in Johannesburg. Henry lives in France  Runge lives in Germany.

The five winners were chosen from 900 applications from 94 countries. The organizers had previously announced 20 shortlisted photographers, including photographers from Nigeria, Senegal, Morocco, Tunisia, Congo and Egypt.

Winners of the prize are included in POPCAP exhibitions shows at Image Afrique in Basel, Lagos Photo Festival, Eyes On-European Month of Photography and the FIFCV Festival Internacional de Fotografiade de Cabo Verde (Cape Verde).

I congratulate all the winners. I can’t help noting that in many European photo festivals, it’s not uncommon to find the work of Europeans who photograph in Africa, but Africans working in Africa aren’t often given showcases that reach international audiences. I wish they were.

Work by all the winners and shortlisted photographers, along with their bios, can be found on the POPCAP website.