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April 9th, 2014

Cramped but Cool Studio: Time To Vote For Your Favorite

Photographers have shared their workspaces in our Cramped But Cool Studio showcase, and now it’s time for PDN Pulse readers to pick the one they think is the coolest. The photographer whose petite space garners the most votes here by April 23 will win a gift certificate from B&H Photo & Video worth $50. (Knowing that their workspace, though small, is admired by readers of PDN Pulse: priceless.)

You can review all three of entries in the Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase by clicking the links below, then cast your vote.

We congratulate each of the photographers who sent us images of their spaces: You’ve all made ingenious use of your small but convenient workspaces.

© Andrea Brizzi

© Andrea Brizzi

Down to the Basics in Honolulu
Photographer Andrea Brizzi shared his one-room, studio-living space in Honolulu.

© MNRD Photography

© MNRD Photography

Polished, 300-Square-Foot Renovation near Toronto
Bob Menard of MNRD Photography in Toronto totally renovated his 300-square foot space to bring light and ease into his basement workspace.

© Emily Hlavac Green

© Emily Hlavac Green

Sunny Dual-Photographer Studio in New Zealand
Alex Lovell-Smith and Emily Hlavac Green of A&E Studio in Dunedin, in the province of Otago, New Zealand, pack a lot into their shared space, which they customized for storage of backdrops and gear.

Which is your favorite? Vote now.

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Cramped but Cool Studio: Time To Vote For Your Favorite

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March 26th, 2014

Magnum Foundation Awards 10 Emergency Fund Grants

© Oscar B. Castillo

© Oscar B. Castillo

The non-profit Magnum Foundation today announced the winners of its 2014 Emergency Fund Grants, which help photographers investigate and complete stories on critical but under-reported issues. This year’s winners will look at a variety of social and political topics in nine countries. The 2014 EF Grantees and their stories are:
Oscar B. Castillo: “Our War, Our Pain,” Venezuela
Qinggang Chen: “Patients at Muli County,” China
Edmund Clark: “Unseen Spaces of the Global War on Terror,” USA/Afghanistan
Carolyn Drake (with Ashley Cleek):  “Invisible Bus,” USA
Zann Huizhen Huang: “Remember Shatila,” Lebanon
Kai Löffelbein: “Death Metals, Indonesia
Laura Morton: “Wild West Tech,” USA
Ed Ou: “North,” Canada
Alessandro Penso: “Refugees in Bulgaria,” Bulgaria
Christian Werner: “Depleted Uranium – The Silent Genocide,” Kosovo

Magnum Foundation has also announced its newest Human Rights Fellows. The fellowships allow photographers from non-Western countries to participate in the six-week photography and human rights program organized by Magnum Foundation and the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, a program designed to focus students on strategies for visual storytelling in their own countries.

The 2014 Fellows are:
Mohammed Elshamy, 19, Egypt
Abbas Hajimohammadisaniabadi, 30, Iran
Yuyang Liu, 22, China
Loubna Mrie, 22, Syria
Pedro Silveira, 29, Brazil
Sumeja Tulic, 28, Bosnia & Herzegovina

Related articles:
Magnum Foundation Announces 2012 Emergency Fund Grantees

PDN Photo of the Day: Laura Morton: Society Galas in San Francisco

March 24th, 2014

VII Photo Announces 5 New Photographers in its Mentor Program

© Poulomi Basu/VII Mentor Program

© Poulomi Basu/VII Mentor Program

VII Photo announced today that five emerging photographers have been selected to join the photo agency’s mentor program.

This year’s roster of photographers were chosen from 150 applicants. Over the next two years, VII photographers will mentor the five emerging photographers to foster their professional growth. The five are:

Poulomi Basu, based in New Delhi, who will be mentored by Stefano DeLuigi
Maika Elan, based in Hanoi, who will be mentored by John Stanmeyer
Ali Arkady, based in Khanaqin, Iraq, who will be mentored by Ed Kashi
Arthur Bondar, currently based in Moscow, who will be mentored by Donald Weber
Cristobal Olivares, based in Santiago, Chile, who will be mentored by Christopher Morris

These five replace the photographers who will soon complete their two years of mentoring in the program: Gazi Nafis Ahmed, Sim Chi Yin, Laura El-Tantawy, Jost Franko and Amanda Rivkin.

VII launched its mentor program in 2008. Past participants have included Benedicte Kurzen, Peter DiCampo, Erin Trieb, Agnes Dherbeys and Gulio Di Sturco. Anastasia Taylor-Lind, who entered the mentor program in 2009 and is now a full member of VII Photo, provided this fun quote for the VII press release: “When I joined the Mentor Program in 2009 I was working part-time as a chiropractor’s receptionist to fund my documentary projects. I knew how to make pictures then, but not how to be a photographer. My mentor, Ron Haviv, taught me how to find my photographic voice and by the time I left two years later I was a fully fledged full-time photojournalist.”

March 24th, 2014

World Press Photo Multimedia 2014 Honors New York Times, National Film Board of Canada, Marco Casino

HighriseThe National Film Board of Canada and The New York Times share first prize for Interactive Documentary in the World Press Photo 2014 Multimedia contest for their collaborative multimedia piece, “A Short History of the Highrise.” The World Press Multimedia awards, now in their fourth year, honor documentary work in three categories: interactive documentaries, short and long features. The winners were announced this morning in Amsterdam.

“A Short History of the Highrise” tells the story of vertical living and the construction of skyscrapers through four short films, photos, text and microgames.

First prize for best short feature was awarded to “Staff Rider,” a video about kids in South Africa who “surf” atop trains. Photographer Marco Casino recorded photos, video and sound for the story. First prize for long feature went to “Witnessing Gezi,” directed by photojournalist Emin Ozmen and Baris Koca, who documented the protests against the development of Istanbul’s Taksim Gezi Park and civil resistance in Turkey.

The first place winner in each category will be awarded a cash award of 1,500 euros.

The full list of winners, and credits for editing, sound design and more, can be found at www.worldpressphoto.org/2014-multimedia-contest/winners-list.

The winners were selected from 373 entrants. The chair of the jury, Jassim Ahmad, global head of multimedia innovation at Reuters, said in a statement, “Interactive teams are employing a variety of visual tools and techniques. We looked for examples that are designed for the medium to explain more and bring you closer.” He also noted, “We agreed innovation could not be at the expense of clarity. Communication is the essence of journalism.”

Other jury members were Gabriel Dance, interactive editor, Guardian US; Liza Faktor, co-founder of Screen; photographer Ed Kashi of the VII Photo Agency; Marianne Lévy-Leblond, head of web productions and transmedia projects at Arte France; Grant Scott, senior lecturer on photography at the University of Gloucestershire and founder and editor Unitednationsofphotography.com; and photographer Luis Weinstein. Alan Stoga, president of Zemi Communications, was the jury secretary.

Related articles
Sinclair, Dimmock Win World Press Multimedia Contest

Jurying the World Press Photo Multimedia Contest (for PDN Subscribers)

The Next Generation of Online Storytelling: Bear 71 (by National Film Board of Canada)

March 13th, 2014

Calumet Photographic to Liquidate, Closes US Stores

calumet-FBCalumet Photographic, the 75-year-old camera supply and rental company, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the Chicago Tribune reports.

This morning, Calumet announced on its Facebook page that it had closed all its stores in the US, though its stores in Europe remain in business.  Calls to Calumet stores in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles were not returned, and the company’s website is down.

Calumet’s bankruptcy filing lists 585 creditors, including photo manufacturers such as Canon, Fuji, Manfrotto, Phase One, Hasselblad, Cambo, Mac Group and many others.

PDN will continue to follow this story.

February 28th, 2014

Facebook’s Teru Kuwayama on How To Use Social Media for Documentary Storytelling

Long before he went to work for Facebook as the social media giant’s liaison to the photo community, photographer Teru Kuwuyama saw social media as a tool for photographers “to eliminate the gatekeepers and the editors, and to be our own operators,” he told a standing-room-only crowd at the Aperture Gallery in New York on Tuesday.  Old media models formed in “an analogue era” no longer exist, but he said many photographers who have been “adaptable” to social platforms are using them to reach and engage audiences.

Kuwayama spoke along with Lev Manovich of the Software Studies Initiative at “Documentary, Expanded: Interventions in Social Media,” a panel moderated by photographer Susan Meiselas, executive director and board member of the Magnum Foundation, which organized the talk as part of its Photography, Expanded program. Photography, Expanded held its first conference, in collaboration with the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project, in April 2013, Meiselas said, to encourage photographers to expand their storytelling beyond the still image at a time when “we all felt the ground shifting beneath our feet” due to a shortage of assignments and production budgets from traditional media. Kuwayama shared work by photographers who are using Instagram to connect with audiences — though not, in most cases, to make money with their images.

He began by showing his own social-media-based project, Basetrack. After having worked in Afghanistan as an embedded photojournalist, Kuwayama won a James S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford, where he came up with a plan to gather a small group of embedded photographers who would post images and information about a Marine battalion in Afghanistan for their families back home. Launched in 2010, Basetrack was “basically a tricked out blog,” he said, with a map and a countdown clock to the end of the Marines’ deployment, but equally important was the Basetrack Facebook page, which “became a rallying point for the community.” Basetrack was never intended to reach more than about 1,000 viewers. “Who cares about this 20-year-old Marine who was 8 when this war started? It was clear it was his mom, his sister,” Kuwayama explained.
(more…)

February 26th, 2014

Video Pick: Adrien Broom Turns Her Studio into an Underwater World

Behind the Scenes of the Blue World from Adrien Broom on Vimeo.

One of our “Studio Tour” features this month goes inside the studio of fine-art photographer Adrien Broom, where she builds the large sets for “The Color Project,” her ongoing series of fantastical narratives. Located in the old Erector Set toy factory in New Haven, Connecticut, the 900-square-foot space has an open plan, large windows and a lot of storage for many of the props and gear she needs when she and her team are spending weeks building the sets. “I have painted the floors over at least ten times, and the walls a few times as well,” she notes. To learn more about the complicated productions she mounts in her studio, we looked at some of the behind-the-scenes videos she has created while working on “The Color Project.” In addition to showing Broom at work, they give a sense of what it takes to turn her workspace into, say, the ocean floor.

All Broom’s behind-the-scenes and stop-motion videos can be found on her Vimeo page.

Related Article
Studio Tour: Adrien Broom’s Place to Work and Play

February 21st, 2014

Cramped But Cool Studio: Sunny Dual-Photographer Studio in New Zealand

© Emily Hlavac Green

© Emily Hlavac Green

A&E Studio in Dunedin, in the province of Otago, New Zealand, houses photographers photographers Alex Lovell-Smith and Emily Hlavac Green. “Though it looks roomy, we pack in a lot here,” says Green (who also shot the photos). The “lot” includes “a custom-made desk complete with makeshift shelves for magazines, plus three backdrops, an art area, coffee grinder, fridge, grapevine, table in the sunniest spot.” When the backdrops are in use, they fill the floor space, so light stands have to be placed on the desk, she says, but when not in use they’re rolled up and stored along a beam in the ceiling. The grapevine was left by the artist who previously occupied the space; it’s thriving in the sunlight from the big windows, Green says. The floorboards have been painted white since a client asked for white floor on a shoot.

Located it an old building in a small town, has some nice conveniences, Green says. “On a good day we can sit out on the ‘balcony’ (fire escape) for lunch. The ‘downstairs office’ (local pub) is close enough that we can pick up our wifi!”

© Emily Hlavac Green

© Emily Hlavac Green

Is your workspace compact but neat, small but con?  Please share it with PDN readers in our Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase. Send us a jpeg or two or three, plus a description of the space and what you like about it to editor@pdnonline.com (be sure to put “Cramped but Cool” in the subject line). The photographer whose Cramped But Cool studio gets the most positive comments and votes on our Facebook page will win a gift certificate to photo retailer B&H Photo & Video.

Coming up on the Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: A sleek little office close to New York City.

Related Articles:

Cramped But Cool Studio: Polished, 300-Square-Foot Reno Near Toronto


Cramped But Cool Studio: Down to the Basics in Hawaii

Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: Show Us Where You Work

February 18th, 2014

Cramped But Cool Studio: Polished, 300-Square-Foot Reno near Toronto

Toronto-based people and pet photographer Bob Menard of MNRD Photography recently completed a renovation on the 300-square-foot basement shooting/working space in the basement of his home, and was kind enough to show us the results.

© MNRD Photography

© MNRD Photography

“I had been using it as my studio before, but it was more of a makeshift setup with fluorescent lighting, popcorn ceilings and carpeting. Not exactly a space I was proud to bring clients to,” Menard says. After the renovation, the space now features eggshell-painted walls, Barnboard Laminate floors, and 5000K LED lights, which he selected for their energy efficiency and color balance, and to brighten the space as much as possible. Menard also says, “I’ve created an office space in one corner (ideal for tethered shooting) and a small viewing area in another with ample storage for my photographic accessories.”

© MNRD Photography

© MNRD Photography

Does your workspace pack maximum efficiency into limited space?  If so, we hope you’ll share it with PDN readers in our Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase. Send us a jpeg or two or three, plus a description of the space and what you like about it to editor@pdnonline.com (be sure to put “Cramped but Cool” in the subject line). The photographer whose Cramped But Cool studio gets the most positive comments and votes on our Facebook page will win a gift certificate to photo retailer B&H Photo & Video.

Coming up on the Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: A sun-kissed workspace in New Zealand.

Related Articles:
Cramped But Cool Studio: Down to the Basics in Hawaii

Cramped But Cool Studio Showcase: Show Us Where You Work

February 17th, 2014

Kodak Alaris Hires New CEO from Motorola Mobility

Kodak Alaris, the personal and document imaging company now owned by the UK Pension Plan (KPP), named Ralf Gerbershagen its new Chief Executive Officer on Friday. Gerbershagen was previously at Motorola Mobility, currently part of Google, where he had held positions as Managing Director Motorola Germany GmbH and VP & General Manager Motorola Mobility Europe and had responsibility for several product portfolios such as Network Infrastructure equipment, Smartphones and Accessories. Gerbershagen’s appointment takes effect April 1, 2014.

Eastman Kodak announced in April 2013 that it was transferring its Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging businesses to its UK Kodak Pension Plan (KPP). The transfer settled the $2.8 billion that KPP claimed against Eastman Kodak during the former film giant’s bankruptcy proceedings. In September, the deal was completed and the company announced its new name, Kodak Alaris.

Kodak Alaris’s Personalized Imaging business includes the manufacture and sale of film products and photographic paper, as well as its business in retail photo kiosks and dry lab systems, and digital souvenir photography services at theme parks, resorts and other destinations.

Gerbershagen will be based in the UK and report to Steven Ross, Interim Chairman of the Board of Kodak Alaris.

Related Articles
Kodak Turns Over Film Division to Its UK Pension Plan

Kodak To Emerge from Bankruptcy in Early September

Kodak Files for Bankruptcy Protection