You are currently browsing an author archive.

January 14th, 2015

Nadia Sablin Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography

"Two-handed Saw." © Nadia Sablin

“Two-handed Saw.” © Nadia Sablin

Nadia Sablin has won the 2014 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography for her series on her aunts who live in northwest Russia. The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, which administers the prize with The Honickman Foundation, announced the award today. Sablin’s book will be published in November 2015 by CDS Books and Duke University Press.

The prize, which is awarded every two years, supports North American photographers who have never published a book-length work. Past winners have included Gerald H. Gaskin, Benjamin Lowy and Danny Wilcox Frazier.

Sablin, who is based in Brooklyn, New York, has been making color photographs documenting the lives of her aunts, Alevtina and Ludmila, for more than six years. Sablin says in her description of the project that  the women, who are in their seventies, “carry on the traditional Russian way of life, chopping wood for heating the house, bringing water from the well, planting potatoes and making their own clothes.”

Sandra S. Philips, curator of photography at the San Francisco Museum of Photography, was the judge for this year’s prize. Joshua Chuang, chief curator of the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, chaired the selection committee that chose the finalists for the prize. The finalists are: Victor Blue, Scott Dalton, Cate Dingley, Hannah Kozak, Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, Joseph Michael Lopez, Diana Markosian, Jeanine Michna-Bales, Chrystie Sherman, Jeffrey Stockbridge and Donna Wan. Their images will be featured on the first Book Prize blog this year.

Related Article
Project on African American and Latino Ballroom Subculture Wins CDS/Honickman First Book Prize

January 7th, 2015

New Instagram Feed Highlights Effects of Climate Change

Everyday Climate Change (photos © the individual photographers)

Everyday Climate Change (photos © the individual photographers)

An Instagram feed showcasing the work of photographers documenting the causes and effects of global climate change launched on January 1. Founded by Tokyo-based photographer James Whitlow Delano, @everydayclimagechange was inspired by the @everydayeverywhere feed, which presents selected images of daily life around the world, and will show how extreme weather and changes to the climate affect life in the developing and the developed world. So far, the feed has featured images by Sara Terry, Katharina Hesse, Michael Robinson Chavez, Janet Jarman, Paolo Patrizi, Ed Kashi, David Butow, John Trotter, Delano and other photographers who have covered such topics as water shortages, pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, forest fires, rising sea levels and the destruction of crops by infestations of funguses and insects.

Delano says that before launching the feed, he contacted photographers he knew who had completed bodies of work relating to climate issues. “I am looking for photographers who are able to see how local climate changes relate to the bigger, global picture,” he says. Delano, who has covered logging and deforestation in Southeast Asia, says he sought photographers based around the world. The contributing photographers are from five continents, and the images featured so far have shown diverse locations: a farm in Mexico; wetlands in Guinea Bissau; a denuded rain forest in southern Papua; a stretch of beach in Far Rockaway, Brooklyn. Says Delano, “I love the way that the photographs tell us that we must all consider how to deal with these issues.”

Though he gave contributors suggestions for hashtags, Delano says he wants to take a hands-off approach to editing. “I have told photographers that I will not curate or interfere unless photos go way off theme. As a photographer, I cherish latitude and freedom.”

Seven days after its launch, the feed has attracted over 1,600 followers. Photographers who have agreed to contribute in the future include Patrick Brown, Ron Haviv, Dominic Bracco II, Veejay Villafranca, Suthep Krisanavarin and Peter DiCampo, co-founder of @EverydayAfrica and @EverydayEverywhere. Delano says he’s happy with the work so far, but might expand the feed in the future. “In a month or so, we may start accepting hashtags or doing a Follow Friday like other everyday feeds. I like the democratization of the feeds that way,” he says. “First, though, I wanted to have a look how the feed functioned. So far, so good.”

Related Articles

Founders of Everyday Feeds Launch @EverydayEverywhere, “Family of Man for the Modern Age”

Picture Story: Everyday Africa on Instagram

Environmental Crusaders: Photographer Peter McBride and the Colorado River

December 23rd, 2014

Amazon Sells iPhone Accessories Infringing Copyrighted News Images of War, Death

Amazon page offering a smartphone case decorated with Daniel Berehulak's image from Liberia.

Amazon page offering a smartphone case decorated with Daniel Berehulak’s image from Liberia.

Dealers of cellphone and iPad cases emblazoned with copyrighted news images by Tomas Van Houtryve, Daniel Berehulak, Tyler Hicks and other photojournalists are using Amazon’s marketplace to sell their wares without permission from the photographers. All the images had been featured by TIME magazine on its “Picks of the Top 10 Photos of 2014.” In addition to the cases featuring news images—such as a photo of a child dying of Ebola and a child killed in an air attack on Gaza—the sellers listed on Amazon also sell cases featuring photos of nature, pets, cars, celebrity actors, major sports teams and other subjects.

A Tyler Hicks image from Gaza on a cellphone case sold by a vendor via Amazon.

A Tyler Hicks image from Gaza on a cellphone case sold by a vendor via Amazon.

One of the infringed photographers, Tomas Van Houtryve, had complained that Amazon removed some of the items infringing his photo, but not all. Van Houtryve tells PDN that after he discovered the unauthorized use of his black-and-white image on cases being sold through Amazon, he contacted the online retailer through the email it provides to report copyright infringement. An automated form asked for more information verifying that he holds the copyright to the image. He says, “I provided that along with a detailed list of links to all of the products infringing on my copyright. I also requested the contact information of the vendors/manufacturers providing the illegal cases,” he says. The following day, some of the products were removed, but many remained. He received another automated email from Amazon saying, “We trust this will bring the matter to a close.” He says, “As you can imagine, I’m not satisfied with this response.” On December 20, he took to Instagram and Facebook, posting images of the pages where the products decorated with his image were sold.

The Massimo Sestini image, cropped on a smartphone case.

The Massimo Sestini image, cropped on a smartphone case.

A search of Amazon for the names of other photographers featured on the TIME list turned up cellphone and iPad cases featuring Tyler Hicks’ image from Gaza of a boy carrying a dead child, Daniel Berehulak’s image of health workers in Liberia carrying a child suffering from Ebola (who later died), and part of Massimo Sestini’s photo of a crowded boat transporting migrants from Africa to Malta, and a tight crop on a portion of Whitney Curtis’s image of police pointing automatic weapons at a protester in Ferguson, Missouri.

Erik Fairleigh, PR spokesperson for Amazon, declined PDN’s request for comment, except to tell PDN “the item is no longer listed for sale,” referring to the product Van Houtryve had complained about. On December 23, however, products made with images by Berehulak, Hicks and Sestini remained on the site.

JP Pappis of Polaris Images, which represents Sestini, says that purusing the makers of the cases would be too costly, since they would be difficult to identify and locate and, if they are overseas, would be beyond the reach of U.S. federal courts. (All the cases “ship from China,” according to the delivery information listed on Amazon.) Sarah Lochting of Getty Images, which represents Daniel Berehulak said the agency is “pursuing the matter. We find it particularly egregious given the content of these images.”

The cases sell for between $12 and $15 through Amazon’s third-party vendor system, which allows any individual or company that fills out an online form to sell their products on Amazon. Amazon’s only requirement is that the seller pay a fee, agree to let Amazon take a cut of sales, and agree to the “Amazon Services Business Solutions Agreement,” which includes a clause indemnifying Amazon against “any claim, loss, damage, settlement, cost, expense or other liability” arising from “any actual or alleged infringement of any Intellectual Property Rights.”

Recognize this photo? Let us know.

Recognize this photo? Let us know.

The sellers offering the photo-emblazoned cases use many names, including David Ray Floyd, Sonja B Williams, DODO7899, Janice Lee Curry, NicoleWilliamHarris. 

Take a look. And if you see your photo on one of the cases being sold, let us know.

Recognize the photo? Let us know.

Recognize the photo? Let us know.

December 19th, 2014

Project on Ukraine Wins $20,000 2015 Aftermath Grant

Justyna Mielnikiewicz has won the 2015 Aftermath Project Grant for “A Ukraine Runs Through It,” a project exploring tensions in modern Ukraine using Dnieper River as a symbolic dividing line. The $20,000 grant, offered by the nonprofit Aftermath Project, supports documentary photography that addresses the legacy of conflict.

The Aftermath Project also announced several finalists, whose work will be published in War Is Only Half the Story, the annual publication of the Aftermath Project. The finalists are:

Bruno Boudjelal, whose project, “Mapping of Massacre Sites in Algeria,” explores the sites of massacres that occurred in 1997 and 1998.

Glenna Gordon for her project, “Artifacts of a Kidnapping: The Things They Carried Home,” a survey of the objects brought home by ransomed kidnapping victims of terrorist groups around the world.

Adam Patterson for “Men and My Daddy,” a project on Northern Ireland, exploring how former terrorists function during peacetime and whether aging ex-paramilitaries find purpose in their lives.

Donald Weber for”War Sand,” a landscape and archeological project about the beaches of Normandy, which still contain particles of shrapnel from the 1944 D-Day invasion of  France during World War II.

A special discretionary grant of $2,500 was given to buy gear for two Syrian refugee teenagers, who have been photographing their lives of Syrians in refugee camps. The money will be administered by photographer Brendan Bannon, who has run UNHCR-sponsored arts education programs for children in refugee camps.

The judges for the 2015 grant were Denise Wolff of Aperture; Amy Pereira of MSNBC; Stephen Mayes, Executive Director of the Tim Hetherington Trust; Elizabeth Rappaport, photographer and Aftermath Project board member;  and Sara Terry, photographer and founder of the Aftermath Project.

Related articles:
Post-9/11 War Business Project Wins 2014 Aftermath Project Grant

Stanley Greene Wins 2013 Aftermath Grant

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Andrew Lichtenstein’s Aftermath Grant

December 8th, 2014

Luke Somers, Killed in Failed Rescue Attempt, Remembered for Compassionate Photos

© Luke Somers for Al Jazeera. Thousands of male and female protesters marched to the residence of President And Mansour Hadi to demand political reforms, December 7, 2012.

© Luke Somers for Al Jazeera. Thousands of male and female protesters marched to the residence of President And Mansour Hadi to demand political reforms, December 7, 2012.

Kidnapped photojournalist Luke Somers was killed December 5 in the midst of a failed attempt by US forces to rescue him from al Qaeda militants holding him hostage in Yemen. Somers, 33,  had been kidnapped in Sana’a, Yemen, in September 2013. He had been working in the country as a freelance photographer.

After President Barack Obama announced Somers’s death on Saturday, several news outlets that Somers had worked for, including Al Jazeera, and his agency, Corbis, shared samples of his photos, starting with images from Yemen’s revolution ousting President Ali Abdullah Saleh in 2011. Writer Tik Root of National Public Radio, who had crossed paths with Somers while they were covering Yemen, said the photographer’s work “reveals his deep and persistent love for the country.”

Last week, the photographer’s captors released a video threatening to kill Somers if the US did not meet their unspecified demands. According to CNN, The Yemen Times and other news outlets had pleaded for Somers’s release, noting days before his death that he “loves Yemen.”

Citing an anonymous source, BBC reports that Navy SEALs had tried to rescue Somers from the compound where he was being held, but a gunfight broke out when the militants spotted the SEALs. Somers was shot, and then evacuated to a US navy ship, where he died.  Committee to Protect Journalists reports that this is the third attempt by US special forces to rescue hostages held in Syria and Yemen; all three failed to rescue captured journalists.

December 3rd, 2014

Shortlist for Deutsche Börse $47,000 Prize Announced

© Nikolai Bakharev. Collection of the Moscow House of Photography Museum

© Nikolai Bakharev. Collection of the Moscow House of Photography Museum

The shortlist for the 2015 Deutsche Börse Prize was announced today.  The annual prize, which comes with 30,000 pound award (about $47,200 US), was established by The Photographers’ Gallery in London. It is given annually to a living photographer (or collaborative partners) to recognize a specific body of work in an exhibition or publication that has contributed significantly to photography in Europe.

The finalists are:
Nikolai Bakharev, nominated for his exhibition at the 55th Venice Biennale of images of bathers on public beaches in Russia, shot during the 1980s and 1990s.

Viviane Sassen, nominated for her exhibition “Umbra,” shown at Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam. The show combined Sassen’s abstract photos, drawings and light installations with poems by Maria Barnas.

Zanele Muholi, nominated for her book Faces and Phases 2006-2014 (Steidl), featuring her black-and-white portraits of members of the LGBT community in South Africa, accompanied by first-person testimonies.

Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, nominated for their book Ponte City (Steidl), about a 54-story apartment block in Johannesburg that has become a refuge for new immigrants to the city. The book, which includes 17 booklets, encompasses architectural plans, essays, personal accounts, and archival material.

The judges for this year’s prize are Chris Boot, Executive Director, Aperture Foundation; Rineke Dijkstra, photographer; Peter Gorschlüter, Deputy Director, MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt and Anne Marie Beckmann, curator of the Deutsche Börse art collection.

The winner will be announced in May 2015 at an award ceremony at The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

Related Articles
Richard Mosse Wins $50K Deutsche Borse Prize for The Enclave

Broomberg and Chanarin Win 2013 Deutsche Borse Prize

November 13th, 2014

If that Kim Kardashian Photo Looks Familiar…

© Jean Paul Goude

© Jean Paul Goude

© Jean-Paul Goude

© Jean-Paul Goude

One of the photos of Kim Kardashian that’s been circulating around (and around) social media since Paper Magazine released its latest issue inspired a sense of déjà vu in people familiar with the work of the photographer who took the image, Jean-Paul Goude. The outlandish shot is a re-hash of a concept and pose Goude used in a 1976 image of model Carolina Beaumont. Perhaps he thought: I liked that photo of a woman balancing a champagne glass on her jutting buttocks looked good once, why not try it again? There are differences in the photos: While the latest overhyped Kardashian spectacle makes us cringe, the original Goude copied makes us squirm.

The Styleite website has insightfully unpacked what makes his use of the Beaumont image grotesque.

In Goude’s original, the subject, who is black, is nude. In his latest version, the subject, who is white, is dressed in evening gown and jewels. In the first, the black woman is “pleased to serve” while the white woman, Styleite notes, is not.  The photo of Beaumont was published in Goude’s 1983 autobiography which he titled Jungle Fever.  The image was controversial at the time, and it hasn’t gotten any more palatable when viewed from a few decades’ distance. The website The Grio delves into more of the history of Goude’s photographs of black women and his fetishization of their body parts in an article called “Kim Kardashian Doesn’t Realize She’s the Butt of an Old Racial Joke.

We wonder: Was Paper so eager for publicity they were willing to court not only Kardashian, but also racial controversy?

November 11th, 2014

Photographer Zwelethu Mthethwa’s Murder Trial Delayed Again

The trial of photographer Zwelethu Mthethwa, who has been charged with the 2013 murder of an alleged sex worker in a suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, has been postponed six months because no judge is available, the Daily Maverick newspaper reports. Mthethwa, who is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery and published his first monograph with Aperture, was arrested in May 2013, and accused of beating and kicking to death Nokuphila Kumalo, 23. A trial scheduled for August 2013 was delayed until April of this year then delayed again until November 10. When Mthethwa appeared in court, however, no judge could be found, so an acting judge set a new trial date of June 1, 2015. Mthethwa remains free on bail.

Outside the courthouse, representatives of  the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce rallied, demanding justice on behalf of the victim, an alleged sex worker. Times Live, a South African news site, reported that Kumalo’s mother was in the courtroom on Monday.

Mthethwa, a graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, has been exhibited internationally. His work was shown at the 2005 Venice Biennale and he had a solo show at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2010.  The murder indictment alleges that Mthethwa “attacked [Kumalo] by repeatedly kicking her and stomping her body with booted feet.” The Sunday Times of South Africa reported the prosecution planned to show closed-circuit television footage of Mthethwa’s car at the scene of the murder.

Related Articles
Fine-Art Photographer Zwelethu Mthethwa Faces Murder Trial August 26

Zwelethu Mthethwa: Color and Commonality

November 4th, 2014

OSI Announces 2014 Audience Engagement Grant Winners, and New Funding Model

Open Society Documentary Photography Project has announced the winners of its Audience Engagement Grant Program, which supports photographers who “have gone beyond documenting a human rights or social justice issue to enacting change.” This year, Open Society Foundations offered two forms of support. The Project Development grants  gave grantees a chance to attend a workshop, organized by Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program, to learn strategies for moving their projects forward. The Project Implementation grants supported photo-based artists who, in partnership with other organizations, are using photography to engage a unique audience. Grant winners were also invited to the professional development retreat.

The grant winners in the Project Development track are:

* Nazik Armenakyan: to document women living with HIV/AIDS in Armenia.
* Paul Botes: to showcase the impact of the Lonmin Marikana Mine violence in South Africa.
* Robert Godden: to address migration policies, practices, and research in Nepal.
* Cristobal Olivares: to confront violence against women in Chile.
* Thenmozhi Soundararajan: to expose sexual violence against Dalit women in India.
* Andri Tambunan: to chronicle the rise of HIV/AIDS within indigenous Papuan communities living in Tanah Papuah.

In the Project Implementation track, the following photographers and partner organizations were named winners:

* Mario Badagliacca with the Archive of Migrant Memories (AMM) on their campaign to collect, archive, and share testimonies of migrants held in Identification and Deportation Centers throughout Italy.
* Rula Halawani with Al-Ma’mal Foundation for Contemporary Art to produce an exhibition addressing Palestinian identity and collective memory, as these relate to the natural and physical environment.
* Karim Ben Khelifa with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Open Documentary Lab, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab to create an augmented reality installation that will allow users to engage with soldiers from across enemy lines.
* Jean Melesaine with Silicon Valley De-Bug to work with California public defender offices in effectively and responsibly producing client “social biography videos” as tools for reducing sentencing and potential incarceration.
* Pete Pin with the Cambodian Association of Greater Philadelphia and Michael Weiss (of IXL Learning) to create an online platform for Cambodian Americans to share their family stories based on ephemera saved from before the war and refugee camps.
* Michael Premo and Andrew Stern with Working Films’ Reel Power Initiative to educate and mobilize communities in areas surrounding shale beds and to build public opposition to the recent lift of a ban on fracking in North Carolina.
* Brooke Singer with the Center for Health, Environment, and Justice to develop a more accessible, user-friendly Superfund365.org, a data visualization archive of the worst toxic-waste sites in the United States.

Open Society Foundations, which funds the grants, announced in April that it decided to divide its funding for projects being launched and those that are ready to implement after recognizing that “cultivating collaborations and effectively executing these projects requires significant effort, time, and strategic planning.” In announcing this year’s winners, Open Society also noted that documentary photographers have to do more to advocate for lasting change than simply raise awareness. As the Open Society Foundation’s website notes, “The 2014 grantees take on multiple and often simultaneous roles—artists, activists, advocates, and community organizers, to name just a few.”

More information on the grant winners, and some of their images, can be found on the Open Society Foundations’ website.

Related Article:

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners

November 3rd, 2014

PhotoPlus Expo 2014: So, You Want to Publish a Photo Book

During her PhotoPlus seminar titled “To Be Published, or Self Publish,” Mary Virginia Swanson, consultant and co-author of Publish Your Photography Book,
ran through the steps involved in producing and marketing a photo book, but again and again she returned to the questions  photographers need to ask themselves before they even consider publishing their work in a book. She asked, “Have you established an audience, and have you established value for your work?” She added, “I see photographers jump ahead before they’ve built an audience for their work.” She said when photographers describe their dream book to her, some mention special papers, large format, and special binding. “I think: ‘That’s a $100 book.’” She urged the audience to consider carefully what prospective buyers will pay to own a book of their images.

She said that photographers have to ask themselves why they want to publish: “Do you have a story you want to share with everyone? Is there a cause or idea you want to advance? As an artist, is it time to get your work out?” As an exercise, she recommended that photographers answer the submission guidelines available on many book publishers’ websites. She showed the lengthy guidelines on the site of Princeton Architectural Press, which ask for a “project description and audience assessment” in eight pages or less. “I feel that if you can complete the Princeton Architectural Press submission guidelines, you can talk to any publisher,” she said. Filling out answers to their questionnaire can help photographers refine their proposals, Swanson said, because “it gets you into the mind of the publisher.” Portfolio reviews, she noted, also provide opportunities to meet two or three book publishers who will “fire back questions” that can help a photographer articulate a book idea.

When shopping for a publisher, she said, “Understand there are small presses and major trade publishers.” A large trade publisher might have staff who can help with design, editing, production management and publicity. Swanson appreciates the attention many small presses will put into designing a book that fits the photographs, but notes that a small press “may be a one- or two-person office” that needs help from a photographer or author on tasks such as editing and publicity. Swanson says there are situations when a publisher, confident that a book can sell well, won’t ask a photographer to contribute towards the cost of production, “and may even pay a small advance.” Those deals are unusual, however. “Most publishers will ask you to contribute in some way,” she said. (For more on this point, see PDN’s article, “The Costly Business of Photo Book Publishing.“)

Whatever the size of the publishing house, she said, “author support is vital” to selling a book. Publishers “will want you to have a website and be active on social media.” While a book takes about a year from concept to binding (less if you self publish), the marketing plan has to begin much earlier, she says, starting with registering a domain name for the book project, planning exhibitions and book signings, and reaching out to potential buyers. Photographers may be affiliated with an association that would buy some copies at a pre-publication cost, or they may be represented by galleries that will buy copies to sell to collectors. Limited edition books have become increasingly collectible, Swanson noted. These are often printed in small quantities, include a signed, limited-edition print, and sell for a few hundred dollars. However, to sell these highly priced editions, a photographer needs to have “established value”—that is, demonstrated that their prints can fetch a high price.

Self-publishing gives photographers total control over design, production and marketing. Photographers who are used to managing photo productions or long-term projects may find self-publishing appealing. “Are you able to manage a publishing project? Are you able to keep to a production calendar?” She noted that print-on-demand companies like Blurb and others now offer a high degree of customization. Swanson showed images of the studio at Conveyor Arts, a production house in Jersey City, New Jersey, that specializes in small-run, custom-designed editions of artists books and exhibition catalogues, and has worked with photographers such as Paula McCartney.

Whether you design your book yourself, or work with a publishing house’s design team, Swanson recommended consulting the many resources available to learn about options for papers, format and binding. Her recommended resources include the Indie Photobook Library, which also organizes traveling shows of photo books; the site Thephotobook.wordpress.com; Aperture’s publication The Photo Book Review; the annual NY Art Book Fair; and the website of the online bookstore Photo-eye,  which includes a showcase of self-published books. If you see a book you admire, she recommended reading the colophon in the back, where the typeface and type of paper used in the book is noted. “Learn the language of publishing so when you work with a designer on your book, you’ll know the vocabulary, and be able to talk about the elements.”

Related Articles

Photographers Share Details of Their Recent Book Deals

The Costly Business of Photo Book Publishing

Tips for Self-Publishing Your Photo Book

The Value of Self-Publishing