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May 20th, 2014

Open Society, Smith Memorial Fund, Burn Magazine, Boulat Association Calling for Grant Applications

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund,  Open Society Foundations, Association Pierre et Alexandra Boulat, and Burn Magazine are all soliciting applications for major photojournalism grants. Deadlines are fast approaching.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund has issued its last call for entries for its $30,000 Grant in Humanistic Photography. There is a $50 application fee, and the deadline for entries is May 31.

The grant is awarded annually to a photographer whose past work and proposed project follows the documentary tradition of legendary photojournalist W. Eugene Smith. Recent winners include Robin Hammond, Peter van Agtmael, and Krisanne Johnson.

The W. Eugene Smith Memorial fund is also calling for entries for the $5,000 Howard Chapnick Grant, which is awarded for education, research, or special projects undertaken in support of the field of photojournalism. Applications for that grant are due July 15, and there is no application fee. See smithfund.org for full details.

The Association Pierre et Alexandra Boulat, based in Paris, has put out a call for entries for the 8,000 euro (about $11,000) Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Grant for photojournalism. The grant is given “in order to allow the winner to produce a story that has never been told but that the photographer cannot find support for within the media,” the association says on its web site. Past winners include Arnau Bach, Maciek Nabrdalik, and Lizzie Saadin.

Applications are due by June 7. There is no application fee. See the association’s web site for an application and guidelines.

The Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project is soliciting proposals for its 2014 Audience Engagement Grant program. The grants, in varying amounts, are designed to help documentary photographers and photo-based artists use their work to affect change by engaging with NGO partners to reach targeted audiences. The deadline for applications is July 8, 2014.

For the first time, OSF is awarding Audience Engagement Grants for training workshops, to help applicants develop their projects, as well as grants for project implementation. See the OSF web site for additional details and application guidelines.

Burn Magazine has announced a call for entries for its $10,000 Emerging Photographer Fund grant. There is a $25 application fee, and the deadline for entries is July 31. The grant, initiated in 2008 by Burn magazine founder David Alan Harvey, is intended to support the continuation of the winners’ personal projects. Past winners have included Diana Markosian, Matt Lutton, and Davide Monteleone. More information is available on the Burn magazine web site.

Related:

Open Society Announces 2013 Audience Engagement Grant Winners
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN subscription required)
Robin Hammond Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant

May 20th, 2014

Wal-mart Sues Photographer’s Widow Claiming Copyright to Decades of Portraits of Walton Family

Wal-mart Stores Inc. and the Walton family, which owns the company, have filed suit to force the widow of an Arkansas portrait photographer to hand over all prints, negatives and proofs of Walton family members made between 1950 and 1994, Professional Photographers of America (PPA) and the Arkansas Times reports. The widow, who reportedly had refused an offer of $2,000 for the pictures, has counter-sued, claiming she owns the copyright.

The Walton family is claiming the photographs belong to them because Bob’s Studio of Photography in Fayetteville made the portraits under the Walton family’s “supervision.” The Walton family says in its lawsuit that the portrait studio stored the photographs as a courtesy, according to the PPA and Arkansas Times reports. More than 200 photographs are in dispute, the reports say.

David Huff and his father, Robert A. Huff, owned Bob’s Studio of Photography. Both are now deceased.

The defendant in the case is Helen B. M. Huff, widow of David Huff. She is countersuing on the grounds that she owns copyright to the photographs because her late husband and his father shot the photographs as private contractors, using their own equipment. She is seeking an injunction against the Walton family and Wal-mart to force them to stop using the photographs without her permission.

A court date is set for July 7.

May 14th, 2014

Kidnapped, Beaten, and Shot in Syria, Photographer and Writer Manage to Escape

Photographer Jack Hill and reporter Anthony Lloyd of The Times of London escaped to Turkey after they were kidnapped, beaten and shot by a rebel gang in Syria, the newspaper has reported.

The two journalists had been in Aleppo accompanied by bodyguards, and were returning to Turkey when their car was forced off the road and they were taken hostage by about seven men.

Hill was forced into the trunk of a car, and “savagely beaten” when he tried to escape, The Times reported. Lloyd was held in the back seat of the car, and was shot twice in the leg during the ordeal.

The two journalists eventually fled to safety in Turkey, although details about how they escaped were not immediately available.

Related:
Spanish Journalists Freed After 194 Days in Captivity in Syria
Freelance Photographer Killed in Syria

May 13th, 2014

Collector Sues Chicago Gallery for Damaging 54 of His Vivian Maier Prints

A photo collector who bought part of the Vivian Maier photo trove when Maier’s storage locker was auctioned off in 2007 has sued a Chicago gallery, Corbett vs. Dempsey, for damaging 54 images during a 2012 exhibition of the work, according to a report today in the Chicago Reader.

Vivian Maier, who was unknown as a photographer when she died in 2009, has since been promoted to stardom by the PR machine of collectors John Maloof and Jeffrey Goldstein. They bought the lion’s share of Maier’s negatives and prints at the 2007 auction and are not involved in the claim against Corbett vs. Dempsey.

The collector suing the gallery is Ron Slattery, who bought several thousand of Maier’s negatives and several thousand prints when her storage locker was auctioned. According to the Chicago Reader report, Slattery provided 56 of the prints to Corbett vs. Dempsey for an exhibition and sale that ran from June through December, 2012.

Two of the prints sold. The gallery returned the other 54 prints in damaged condition, Slattery claims. He alleges that the gallery used too much hinge glue to mount the photographs, and it soaked through the print paper, “severely distorting the images.”

Slattery’s claim also that the damage was “exacerbated” by exposure of the prints to “excessive heat,” and he alleges the gallery tried to cover up the damage, according to the Chicago Reader report.

The gallery says it admitted the damage to Slattery upon return of the images, and claims have made “multiple” offers to settle the claim for $8,700–the cost of repairs estimated by a restorer consulted by the gallery.

Slattery is seeking $200,000 in actual damages to the photographs, plus $2 million in punitive damages.

May 6th, 2014

New Free Web Service Claims to Offer Solution to Runaway Image Fakery

San Jose-based Fourandsix Technologies has announced plans to capitalize on “a growing distrust of manipulated images” with the launch of new forensic tool “to prove that hosted photos have not been modified with Photoshop or other tools,” according to a press release.

The tool is available for free to individual users at izitru.com. A developer API making it possible to integrate the photo authentication software into any website is available to third parties for a fee.

“Viewers are unsure of what to trust, whether they’re looking at a selfie on Facebook, an item for sale on eBay, or a dramatic storm cloud photo on Twitter,” the company says in its announcement.

The izitru.com website prompts users to upload their JPEG images, which are then subjected to six different forensic tests to distinguish original camera files from “subsequent derivations”–ie, files altered with Photoshop or other tools.  “Images that pass all six of these tests get the highest trust rating,” the company says in its announcement.

One of our first questions was, Can this tool be used to determine the authenticity of images already posted online–such as winners of major awards in photojournalism contests, or any other news images, for that matter? (more…)

May 2nd, 2014

Bon Appétit, W, National Geographic, Glamour Win National Magazine Awards for Visuals

bon appetit cover2Bon Appétit, National Geographic, W, and Glamour were the winners of the photography, multimedia and video category awards in the 2014 the National Magazine Awards competition, the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) has announced. The winners were honored at a ceremony last night in New York.

Bon Appétit won the Photography award for overall excellence in print magazine photography. The magazine also won the Style and Design award for fashion, decorating, design and travel coverage.  Alex Grossman and Alex Pollack serve as the magazine’s creative director and photo director, respectively.

W magazine won the Feature Photography award for a May 2013 feature titled “Stranger Than Paradise” with a series of fanciful photographs of Tilda Swinton by Tim Walker.

National Geographic won the Mulitmedia award for “The Last Chase” by Robert Draper, a story about storm chaser Tim Samaras’s death last May 31 in a tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma.

National Geographic also won the Tablet Magazine award for its August, October and November iPad editions.

Glamour won the Video award for three videos from its “Screw You Cancer” series: “Confronting Cancer: BRCA1 & BRCA2 Gene Mutations,”  “Recovery: Meds. And Love,” and “Life Post-Surgery: Back on Stage.” All were posted on Glamour.com last October.

According to ASME, which sponsors the awards, sixty-six magazines were honored as finalists in 24 categories, and 17 magazines won awards. Among the other winners were Fast Company, which won Magazine of the Year; New York magazine, which won the General Interest, Design, and Website awards; and TIME magazine, which won the Public Interest award. The Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame Award went to Graydon Carter, the editor of Vanity Fair since 1992.

A complete list of winners and finalists is posted on the ASME website.

May 1st, 2014

George Steinmetz Wonders: Was It Worth Getting Arrested for National Geographic Cover Story Photos?

Brookover Ranch Feed Yard near Garden City, Kansas, with adjacent crop circles of grain used to fatten cattle. © 2014 George Steinmetz/National Geographic

A picture worth being arrested for? Brookover Ranch Feed Yard near Garden City, Kansas, with adjacent crop circles of grain used to fatten cattle.                © 2014 George Steinmetz/National Geographic

This month’s cover story of National Geographic, about how to meet growing worldwide demand for food, is the story that got photographer George Steinmetz in trouble last June, and he’s still stinging from the experience.

Caught in the political crossfire between animal rights activists and agribusiness interests trying to make it illegal to photograph factory farm operations, he wound up in jail in Kansas while on assignment to shoot the story, called “The New Food Revolution.”

“It was quite a surprise to me,” says Steinmetz, who is renowned for the beautiful aerial landscapes he shoots all over the world, and who is used to encounters with authorities. “I’ve been detained in Iran and Yemen, and questioned about spying, but never arrested. And then I get thrown in jail in America.” (more…)

April 29th, 2014

Mark Ruwedel Wins 2014 Scotiabank Photography Award

"Tonopah and Tidewater #25," 2002. ©Mark Ruwedel, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York.

Tonopah and Tidewater #25, 2002. ©Mark Ruwedel, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York.

Landscape photographer Mark Ruwedel is the winner of the 2014 Scotiabank Photography Award, the bank announced this evening at an awards ceremony in Toronto.

In addition to receiving a $50,000 cash prize, Ruwedel will have a book of his work published by Steidl, and will have an exhibition at Ryerson Image Centre, Ryerson University, in Toronto.

“I’ve followed the development of Mark Ruwedel’s work with keen interest for over thirty years,” Edward Burtynsky, co-founder of the award and chair of the jury, said in a prepared statement. “He is a master of seeing and printing and has inspired countless landscape photographers.”

The two other finalist for the prize were Rodney Graham, a conceptual artist working in a variety of media including photography; and documentary photographer Donald Weber, who was one of the PDN‘s 30 in 2008.

The Scotiabank Photography Award was established four years ago to honor the work of contemporary Canadian photographers. Previous winners include Stan Douglas, Arnaud Maggs and Lynne Cohen.

This year’s finalists were selected by a three-member jury that included Robert Bean, an artist, writer and photography professor; Catherine Bédard, an art historian and Deputy-Director of the Canadian Cultural Centre; and Ann Thomas, Curator, Photographs Collection, at the National Gallery of Canada.

April 24th, 2014

Tyler Hicks Wins Robert Capa Gold Medal Award

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

A Westgate mall visitor shelters children during an attack by Somali gunmen last September. ©Tyler Hicks/The New York Times

Tyler Hicks of The New York Times has won the 2013 Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for his coverage of the attack last September on the Westgate mall in Nairobi, Kenya, the Overseas Press Club (OPC) has announced.

Continue reading at PDNonline.com.

Related:
Josh Haner, Tyler Hicks Win 2014 Pulitzer Prizes for Photography

April 24th, 2014

If Photography Is Not a Crime, When Will Police Get the Message?

In February, just as the City of Baltimore was hammering out a legal settlement to end police interference with photographers, Baltimore police forcibly removed a Baltimore Sun photo editor from the scene of a shooting on a public street. That action underscored a seemingly intractable problem: getting the message to rank-and-file police officers that people have a constitutional right to photograph police carrying out their duties in public.

Judges have repeatedly thrown out criminal charges against photographers arrested while photographing police activities in public. Cities have had to pay to settle claims of civil rights violations stemming from some of the arrests. The City of Boston, for instance, agreed in 2012 to pay $170,000 to settle a videographer’s civil rights claims over his arrest for videotaping police arresting another person on the Boston Common. Baltimore ended up paying $250,000 as part of its recent settlement with Christopher Sharp, who alleged that police erased the videos on his iPhone after detaining him for using the iPhone to record the arrest and beating of another person.

And yet the incidents of police interference with photographers continue apace. No sooner is one case settled, when another incident or claim pops up.

“It certainly is like playing a game of whack-a-mole,” says attorney Mickey Osterreicher of the National Press Photographers Association. (more…)