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February 17th, 2015

Daniel Berehulak Wins Reportage Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Ebola victim James Dorbor, 8, is rushed into a treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia last September. He died a short time later. ©Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Australian photographer Daniel Berehulak of Getty Images has won Photographer of the Year honors in the Reportage Division of the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition, which is currently underway at the University of Missouri in Columbia. Paul Hansen of Sweden and Daniel Rodrigues of Portugal were the first and second runners up, respectively.

Berehulak’s winning portfolio emphasized his coverage of the Ebola crisis in West Africa. It also included stories about national elections in India, the economic downturn in Brazil, and single images from stories in Somalia, Afghanistan, and Kenya.

In other POYi Reportage Division categories, Lisa Krantz (USA) won the Community Awareness Award for her project titled “A Life Apart: The Toll of Obesity.”  Finalists for the award included Mario Tama (USA), Toni Greaves (USA), April Saul (USA) and Kuang Huimin (China). (Krantz also won second place for her obesity project in the Issue Reporting Picture Story category of the POYi competition’s Newspaper Division.)

The World Understanding Award went to Jan Grarup (Denmark) for “Somalia in Transition,” and judges awarded Special Recognition to Ryan Spencer Reed (USA) for his project titled “Despite Similarities to Reality.” Finalists for the World Understanding Award were Edu Ponces (Spain), Paula Bronstein (USA), and Renée C. Byer (USA).

David Chancellor (UK) won the Environmental Vision Award for his project “With Butterflies and Warriors.” Michael Robinson Chavez (USA) was awarded special recognition for “The Driest Season: California’s Dust Bowl.”

Other POYi Reportage Division categories and winners included:

News Picture Story: John Moore (1); Carolyn Cole (2); Arash Khamooshi (3)
Feature Picture Story: Hajdú D. András (1); Tomás Munita (2); Corrina Kern (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story: Brent Stirton (1); Alex Masi (2); Daniel Berehulak (3)
Science & Natural History Picture Story: Javier Arcenillas (1); unidentified* (2); Stuart Palley (3)
Science & Natural History: unidentified* (1); unidentified* (2); unidentified* (3)
Best Photography Book Award: TBA The Long Shadow of Chernobyl by Gerd Ludwig

Judging for the POYi competition began February 2 with News Division Entries. Winners in that division, selected last week, included Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Sports Photographer of the Year Cameron Spencer of Getty Images.

Judging for the Reportage Division took place from February 11 to February 14. The competition concludes this week with judging of the Visual Editing Division entries.

*Contest organizers have posted all the winning entries, but have not officially identified winners. Please help us name them.

Related stories:

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year 2014 Prize

February 12th, 2015

Mads Nissen Wins World Press Photo of the Year Prize

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

2014 World Press Photo of the Year. ©Mads Nissen/Politiken

Danish photographer Mads Nissen of the daily newspaper Politiken has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2014 prize for an image showing a gay couple during an intimate moment in St. Petersburg, Russia. The image, which was part of the news coverage last year about rising discrimination and hate crimes attacks against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Russia, also won first prize in the Contemporary Issues category of the World Press Photo competition. The winners of the contest were announced February 12 in Amsterdam.

Read the full story at PDNOnline.com.

 

February 10th, 2015

Cameron Spencer Wins POYi Sports Photographer of the Year Honors

©Cameron Spencer

©Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Photographer Cameron Spencer of Getty Images has been named Sports Photographer of the Year at the 2015 Pictures of the Year International competition, organizers announced today. His portfolio included a variety of dramatic sports action and feature images from a wide array of sporting events, including the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Runners up for the award were second place winner Al Bello of Getty Images and third place winner Patrick Smith.

In other sports categories, first prize for a Sports Action photo went to Al Bello of Getty Images for his dramatic shot of New York Giants receiver making a one-handed touchdown catch.

The winners of other sports categories are:

Sports Feature: Robert Sabo/Getty (1); Cameron Spencer/Getty (2); Ricky Carioti
Recreational Sports: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Sol Neelman (2); Austin Anthony/AP (3)
Sports Action: Al Bello/Getty (1); Alex Livesey/Getty (2); Joel Marklund
Winter Olympics: Lucas Jackson/Reuters (1); Joel Marklund (2); Ezra Shaw/Getty
Sports Picture Story: Jacob Ehrbahn (1); Cristina Aldehuela (2); Yasuyoshi Chiba (3)

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Sports photo categories fall under the competition’s News Division. Judging of Reportage Division entries begins tomorrow.

Related:
Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

February 9th, 2015

PDN Video Pick: Office Scene (“Today, I’m going to let them touch me”)

Photographer Endia Beal’s video “Office Scene” demonstrates how it is possible to make strong, compelling video with almost nothing, if you’re smart about it.

The video is a foray into the discomfort zone of inter-office race and personal relations. Beal, who is African American, heard rumors around a corporate office she worked in that several of her white male colleagues were fascinated by her hair. So she decided to let them touch it–on the conditions that they really dig their hands in, and agree to talk on tape afterwards about how the experience felt to them. Amazingly enough, they agreed. “I transform into a voyeuristic actress fulfilling the desires of my male colleagues,” Beal explains. She uses just two video shots to tell the story. By focusing her camera on the banal and stripping the visuals down to a minimum, she’s able to use the audio to maximum effect, leaving much to the imagination of the viewer.

Beal projected this video, along with her more recent (and equally compelling) “9 to 5″ video, at the National Geographic Photography Seminar last month in Washington, DC.

She explained at that seminar that her work is intended to push conversation about the experience of women of color in corporate America, particularly about issues that people are afraid to talk about. Beal credited Tod Papageorge with pushing her to use photography to explore her own experiences while she was enrolled in the MFA photography program at Yale.

“I said, ‘[Those experiences are] so intimate and personal to me,’” she recounted. “He said, ‘Those are the stories that need to be told.’ So I took the risk. I had no idea that something so personal and private could be universally translated, that other people could understand, that a minority woman could speak to the universal.

“The history of photography for minority women is still being written,” she continued. “I think about Deborah Willis, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Deana Lawson, Carrie Mae Weems, Lorna Simpson–all these wonderful women. But our book is really short. If I can add a couple of photographs to that narrative, then I’ve done my job.”

Related:
Look3: Carrie Mae Weems on Race, Sexuality, History and Finding Meaningful Work

February 6th, 2015

Brad Vest Named Newspaper Photographer of the Year at 2015 POYi Competition

From "Last One Standing," a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

From “Last One Standing,” a story by Newspaper Photographer of the Year Brad Vest about families living in the Foote Homes housing development in Memphis. ©Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal

Brad Vest of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tennessee has won Newspaper Photographer of the Year honors at the 72nd annual Pictures of the Year International competition. Vest’s portfolio stood out for its journalistic and esthetic quality, POYi organizers said in a statement released on Friday evening.

Runners-up for the award were Michael Robinson Chavez of the Los Angeles Times, who won second place; and Lisa Krantz of the San Antonio Express-News, who took third place.

Judging for the POYi competition began at the University of Missouri on February 2, and will continue through February 20. Judging for the News Division categories ends later today.

Winners of other News Division categories so far include Bulent Kilic, who won first place in the Spot News category for his dramatic photograph of an air strike against ISIS militants near the Turkish border; and Alexey Furman, first place winner in the Portrait category for his photograph of a woman who survived the shelling of her home in eastern Ukraine.

Philip Montgomery won first place in the Feature category for an image from the protests in Ferguson, Missouri, while Evgeniy Maloletka won top hones in the General News category for a graphic image from the scene of the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in eastern Ukraine last summer.

Organizers will officially announce the names of all winners after the judging is complete on February 20.

Winners PDN was able to identify of categories judged so far in the News Division include:

Feature: Philip Montgomery (1); Toni Greaves (2); Kevin Frayer (3)
General News: Evgeniy Maloletka (1); Andreas Bardell (2); unidentified* (3)
World Health: Pete Muller (1); unidentified* (2); John Moore (3)
Portrait: Alexey Furman (1); Philip Montgomery (2); Asa Sjöström (3)
Portrait Series: Victoria Will (1); Marcus Trappaud Bjørn (2); Pieter ten Hoopen (3)
Spot News: Bulent Kilic (1); Moises Saman (2); Anastasia Vlasova (3)
Human Conflict: William Daniels (1); Bulent Kilic (2); Andrey Stenin (3)
News Picture Story–Newspaper: unidentified* (1); Marcus Yam (2); Marcus Yam (3)
Issue Reporting Picture Story–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Lisa Krantz (2); unidentified (3)
Feature Picture Story–Newspaper: Stiller Ákos (1); Spencer Heaps (2); Mads Nissen (3)
Photographer of the Year–Newspaper: Brad Vest (1); Michael Robinson Chavez (2); Lisa Krantz (3)

Judging for sports category entries began over the weekend, and ends today (Monday). Reportage Division entries will be judged later this week, while Editing Division entries will be judged during the week of February 16.

*Readers: Please help us identify these winners.

January 28th, 2015

PDN Video Pick: Acclaimed Beijing Portrait Project, Expanded with Video

With support from two clients and a creative approach to funding, photographer Sim Chi Yin has just released this video showing an old project from a new, more immersive angle. The video profiles Zhang Xi, a college graduate turned street peddler who is part of Beijing’s “Rat Tribe,” so named because they live in sub-standard apartments in the basements and former bomb shelters of the city.

Sim’s portraits of “Rat Tribe” basement dwellers, which she began making in 2010, have been widely published–and widely acclaimed. She previously produced a multimedia slideshow of the portraits. But this video expands on her earlier work by exploring how one subject ended up living in a Beijing basement, the tension it has caused with his parents, and what day-to-day life is like for him.

The video, published January 24 by Creative Time Reports (CTR) and Al Jazeera America, is also a case study in multi-source production funding. Sim says it was first “leanly funded” by CTR, a media website that commissioned the video last fall for a European conference on migration issues. For additional funding, Sim applied to the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. Around the same time, Al Jazeera America asked Sim for new portraits of Beijing basement dwellers, and an updated multimedia piece. So she put CTR and Al Jazeera in touch with each other, and “they decided to work together and timed their publications to appear on the same day.”

Sim hired producer Yin Jiawei, a recent college graduate, to work as a fixer and assist with the shooting.  The video was edited by Jian Yi, a freelance Chinese filmmaker.

Related:
Picture Story: Beijing’s Basement Dwellers
PDN’s 30 2013: Sim Chi Yin

January 14th, 2015

PDN Video: Jay Maisel on How to Be a Better Street Photographer

Jay Maisel on How to Be a Better Photographer from PDNOnline on Vimeo.

Based on the lessons he’s taught to photography students over the past five years at PhotoPlus Expo and elsewhere, legendary photographer Jay Maisel recently published Light, Gesture & Color (New Riders Press). He describes the book as one “for people that are tired of bullshit books that tell them exactly what to do, and so they get rote results.” In this video, Maisel shares advice from his book on how to take better photographs, including tips on how to be a more successful street photographer. In a separate PDN video, Maisel explains what he means by the term “gesture,” why it is an important element of good photographs, and how to recognize and use it to your advantage.

Related:
Jay Maisel on the Importance of “Gesture” in Photography

January 9th, 2015

National Geographic’s Photo Engineering at Work

Striving for new and unusual ways to photograph subjects from land, sea, and air, National Geographic photographers often turn for technical assistance to NG photo engineers Kenji Yamaguchi and David Mathews. The two men, who are the subjects of an article in January PDN and now on PDN online, devise ingenious tools for making pictures that would otherwise be too dangerous or difficult for photographers to make. ““These guys are the unsung heroes of the Geographic,” says long-time contributor George Steinmetz.

Yamaguchi and Mathews worked behind the scenes on Nick Nichols’s Serengeti lions project, Steve Winter’s snow leopards project, and various projects by underwater photographer David Doubilet, to name just a few examples. Here are some videos that show their technical ingenuity in action:

 


Nick Nichols and his assistant, Nathan Williamson, at work on the Serengeti lions project with a robotic camera tank and a camera drone.

 


Steve Winter explains how he used camera traps to photograph a mountain lion at night under the Hollywood sign.

 


The Photo Engineering department faces possible budget cuts, but National Geographic recently profiled of Kenji Yamaguchi, with this video showing him at work in the publisher’s Photo Engineering lab.

 

Addition videos on National Geographic’s web site:

Steve Winter describes his 2008 snow leopard project in northern India. Scenes of Winter setting up remote cameras and strobes on snow leopard trails start at 2:47.

An encounter, narrated by Steve Winter, between a tiger and a robotic camera vehicle developed by NG Photo Engineering.

Scenes from the sinking of a ship for the creation of an artificial reef, featuring David Doubilet’s remote camera images from the ship’s deck as engineers set explosive charges, then detonated them. Remote camera images begin at 1:21.

Related Article:
The Technical Ingenuity of National Geographic’s Photo Engineering Department

December 18th, 2014

Time Inc. UK Issues Rights-Grabbing Contract

Time Inc.’s UK division has riled editorial photographers by issuing a new contract requiring freelancers to hand over “all rights” to any assignment images for about 60 specialty publications. The contract takes effect January 1, 2015, but there may be wiggle room for negotiation, at least for some photographers who take the initiative to push back.

“It’s an outrageous rights grab,” says photographer David Hoffman, spokesperson for Editorial Photographers UK (EPUK). “It’s just bullying.”

The contract applies to a wide array of Time Inc UK titles, including fashion, lifestyle, entertainment, and shelter magazines, as well as  niche magazines for marine, wine, gardening, fishing, sport, and technology enthusiasts. The contract does not apply to assignments for TIME, the weekly news magazine.

“The new agreements better reflect our needs as a multi-platform business,” Time Inc. UK’s director of corporate communications Karen Myers told PDN via e-mail. “Contributors need to bear in mind that commercial realities dictate that we will be using the content that we purchase in many different ways to reflect the changing media landscape, both now and in the future.”

Myers acknowledges that some photographers “will not want to assign and/or waive their rights and there is no obligation for them to do so – if they do not wish to do so, they may object and negotiate different terms with us in the usual way.”

Hoffman explains, “If an editor really wants your particular work, or is sympathetic to you, they may be able to do individual deals.”

But photographers who aren’t able to negotiate to keep their copyrights will be deprived of the right to re-license assignment images,  which could ultimately hurt Time Inc., Hoffman says. “The best photographers won’t work for them under those terms,” and those photographers who do accept the terms won’t have much incentive to do their best work, he explains.

December 18th, 2014

Police Intimidation Watch: Photographer Wins $1.1 Million for Malicious Prosecution

A New York woman who was arrested and jailed for four days after photographing an Air National Guard base from a public thoroughfare was awarded $1.1 million in compensatory damages by a federal jury last week.

Nancy Genovese sued the town of Southampton, New York, the Suffolk County sheriff’s department and several individual officers in 2010, alleging violations of her constitutional rights, assault, battery, false arrest, use of unreasonable and excessive force, and malicious prosecution.

In a trial that concluded December 11, jurors concluded that Suffolk County sheriff’s deputy Robert Carlock had maliciously prosecuted Genovese. But Genovese failed to prove that Carlock had initiated criminal proceedings because of her political associations. Therefore, the jury found that Carlock was not liable for violating Genovese’s First Amendment right of free speech.

Although jurors reached agreement on the $1.1 million award for compensatory damages, they were unable to reach a unanimous decision on punitive damages, so deliberations are continuing.

According to court papers, Genovese was driving home in July, 2009 past the Gabreski Airport Air National Guard base in Suffolk County (Long Island) when she stopped her car to photograph a helicopter on display in front of the base. Genovese made the photograph from inside her car, intending to post the photo on a “Support Our Troops” website.

As she was preparing to drive away, a Southampton, New York police officer approached her and asked what she was doing. Genovese explained what she was photographing, tried to show the officer the images on her camera’s LCD, and then ended up giving the officer her camera card to protect her camera, which the officer was treating roughly, according to Genovese’s lawsuit.

At that point, the Southampton police officer ordered Genovese to remain where she was, and called the county sheriff’s department to report Genovese’s presence outside the base, “falsely and wrongly informing” the sheriff’s department that Genovese “posed a terrorist threat,” she said in her claim.

Authorities from the FBI, Homeland Security, the ANG base, and the local police and sheriff’s department rushed to the scene. Genovese was questioned on the roadside for “five or six hours.” She alleged that her car was searched without her consent, and because she had just come from a local shooting range, authorities found an AR 15 rifle, as well as a shotgun and ammunition, in her car. Southampton police seized the guns, which were legally registered, according to court papers.

According to the suit, Suffolk sheriff’s deputy Carlock said to Genovese, “You’re a right winger, aren’t you?” He and another unidentified officer proceeded to taunt Genovese, repeatedly referring to her as a “right winger” and “tea bagger” and allegedly threatening to arrest her for terrorism “to make an example of her to other ‘tea baggers.’”

After hours of questioning, federal authorities concluded that Genovese wasn’t a security threat. After they left the scene, however, an unidentified sheriff’s deputy handcuffed Genovese, and transported her to jail, where Carlock allegedly told her that although authorities “had nothing to charge her with,” they would “find something in order to teach all right wingers and tea baggers a lesson.”

She was charged later that night with “terrorism,” and arraigned the next day on criminal trespass charges. Bail was set at $50,000 because of sheriff’s “inflammatory accusations” that she was a terrorist and a flight risk, she alleges in her lawsuit.

Genovese spent four days in the county jail, until she was finally able to raise the money for her bail. While in jail, she alleges, deputies continued to taunt her, subject her to sleep deprivation, deny her medical care for a leg injury that became infected, and instigate alarmist media coverage by releasing to reporters false information about Genovese and the circumstances of her arrest.

The criminal trespass charges against Genovese were dismissed in November, 2009. She filed suit on July 29, 2010.

In her lawsuit, she alleged violation of her First Amendment right of free speech, as well as violations of her Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments rights of freedom from unreasonable search and seizure. She also claimed she was subject to fear and terror, humiliation, degradation, physical pain and emotional distress.

In 2013, a federal judge dismissed Genovese’s claims against the town of Southampton and its police officers. The judge ruled that the Southampton police officer who originally stopped Genovese had probable cause to do so; that the officer didn’t use excessive force; and that Southampton police seized a gun in her car “under a lawful exception to the warrant requirement of the Fourth Amendment” because it was in plain view insider her car. Therefore, the court said, Southampton police did not violate her constitutional rights.

The judge also dismissed false arrest claims against Suffolk County sheriffs, on the grounds that they acted on the “probable cause” determination of Southampton police. But the court declined to dismiss Genovese’s malicious prosecution claims against Carlock and the sheriff’s department, clearing the way for the trial, which began December 8 and lasted for three days.

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