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January 14th, 2014

Post-9/11 War Business Project Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

© Luca Locatelli

© Luca Locatelli

Italian photographer Luca Locatelli has won the $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for his project “United Colours of War,” which looks at the increase in business connected to war following 9/11.

The Aftermath Project also recognized several finalists, whose work will be included in War is Only Half the Story, the annual Aftermath Project publication: Philippe Dudouit for his project on rebel movements in the Sahel region of Africa; Olga Ingurazova for her work on Abkhazia; Diana Markosian for her project on young Muslim girls raised in post-war Chechnya; and Javad M. Parsa for his work about Iranian refugees living around the world.

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization founded by photographer and filmmaker Sara Terry that supports documentary photography that tells post-conflict stories. The Foundation to Promote Open Society provides funding for the Aftermath Project Grant.

Judges for this year’s grant were: MaryAnne Golon, Director of Photography, The Washington Post; Elizabeth Krist, Senior Photo Editor, National Geographic; Muriel Hasbun, Professor and Chair of Photography, Corcoran College of Art+Design; Elizabeth Rappaport, photographer, board member The Aftermath Project; Sara Terry, photographer, founder and artistic director, The Aftermath Project.

Related: What It Takes To Win An Aftermath Project Grant
Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application

December 16th, 2013

New Elliott Erwitt Book Comes With Hidden Flask of Rare Macallan Whisky

An image from Elliott Erwitt's new book with The Macallan. © Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos

An image from Elliott Erwitt’s new book with The Macallan. © Elliott Erwitt/Magnum Photos

Scotch whisky producer The Macallan announced the latest release in its “Masters of Photography” series—a book of photographs Elliott Erwitt made on commission in Scotland. The book, Elliott Erwitt’s Great Scottish Adventure, features 158 images the Magnum photographer made during an open commission to photograph in Scotland.

Erwitt is the fourth photographer to work on “The Macallan Masters of Photography” series; Rankin, Watson and Annie Leibovitz preceded him. (more…)

December 9th, 2013

Photogs Richard Mosse and Zanele Muholi Named Top “Global Thinkers” by Foreign Policy

Two photographers, Richard Mosse and Zanele Muholi, made Foreign Policy (FP) magazine’s list of “The Leading Global Thinkers of 2013.” The list of 100 people Foreign Policy chose to single out in its hefty digital feature includes Edward Snowden, John Kerry, Elon Musk, The Pope, Rand Paul, scientists, innovators, politicians and artists.

FP cited Mosse for “seeing war through a new lens.” His pink-hued images of military and militia in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, created using now-discontinued Kodak Aerochrome film developed for the U.S. Military, have captivated audiences through their unusually esthetic interpretation of a conflict-ridden landscape and population. FP notes that Mosse’s film, “The Enclave,” “stole the show” at the 2103 Venice Biennale.

Mosse’s works “are allowing viewers to see conflict in a way they never imagined they could,” FP writes.

Zanele Muholi, a South African artist, has documented the black LGBT community in her country through striking black-and-white portraits. FP singles Muholi out “for photographing hidden lives,” and notes that her work has been widely published and exhibited, bringing much-needed awareness to the gulf between the legal rights of LGBT South Africans and their actual treatment in their communities.

FP divided their list of Global Thinkers into groups that included “Artists,” “Advocates,” “Challengers” and “Decision-Makers” among others. Mosse and Muholi are considered “Chroniclers,” people who, FP says, “[show] us novel ways of understanding the world and our place in it.”

Related: Theft of South African Photog’s Work May Be Attempt to Silence Her
Field Studies: Exploring the Complexities of War-Torn Congo

December 5th, 2013

Barter, Creative Collaboration Pay Off for Photog Mark Mann and Custom Tailor Lord Willy’s

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men's custom tailor Lord Willy's, with art direction and styling by the brand's co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It's also his head on the wall.

A collaboration between photographer Mark Mann and men’s custom tailor Lord Willy’s, with art direction and styling by the brand’s co-owner, Alex Wilcox. Wilcox (right) is pictured here with a client. It’s also his head on the wall.

“It’s such a joy to work with an art director who’s also the client,” says Mark Mann, the photographer behind a series of images currently gracing the walls and website of Lord Willy’s, a men’s custom tailor in New York’s Nolita neighborhood. (more…)

November 26th, 2013

Updated: Tragic Story of Former Photoj Inspires Upswell of Support on FB

Yesterday photojournalist Benjamin Lowy posted a photograph on Instagram and Facebook of a man he identified as a former photojournalist, who through a series of tragic circumstances found himself living on the street. Lowy shared his image of the man, named Scott Sutton, and recounted the conversation he and Sutton had on the street near Union Square in New York City. After Lowy told Sutton that he is a photojournalist, “the conversation took a turn to the surreal,” Lowy wrote.

Sutton told Lowy that he had once been a photojournalist as well. According to Lowy, Sutton told him he’d lost everyone close to him, including his wife, who passed away, and has been on the street for two years.

Many in and out of the photo community have shared the story and posted nearly 100 comments on Facebook. Several people have said they know Sutton and have offered to help him. “Very difficult to see him this way but any of us could easily find ourselves in the same spot,” wrote Patrick Whalen, a Wall Street Journal photo editor who said he worked with Sutton in the 90s.

As of this afternoon, Lowy wrote an update saying that since the post yesterday, “quite a few of his friends have contacted me from RIT – where he did his PJ grad schooling, and Archive Photos – where he was a darkroom tech in the 90′s. Currently we are all trying to figure out how to best help him, and I’ll be going back out today to try and find him.”

Lowy’s image and story are here, on his Facebook page.

Update: A previous version of this article stated that Sutton had worked as a photojournalist for Getty Images. A Getty representative told PDNPulse via email that Sutton never worked as a Getty Images photographer.

November 26th, 2013

Job Rankings Claim Dishwasher a Better Job than Photojournalist

Career-building website CareerCast.com has ranked the top 200 jobs, and “Photographer” and “Photojournalist” were ranked 172 and 188 respectively.

According to the study, which factors in “physical demands, work environment, income, stress, and hiring outlook,” noted the Wall Street Journal, photojournalist ranks just above “corrections officer” and just below “dishwasher.”

Photographers fare slightly better than photojournalists in the rankings, sandwiched between “Construction Worker” and “Seamstress/Tailor.”

“Newspaper reporter” was the worst of the 200 jobs ranked by the survey.

Read the full list of rankings over at the Wall Street Journal, but we advise you take them with a grain of salt and have a good laugh.

Related: Newspaper Job Cuts Hit Photographers Hardest, Pew Research Says

November 18th, 2013

Pro Tips for Photographers with Jake Stangel

Colleagues know San Francisco-based photographer Jake Stangel as a person who is open with information, advice and encouragement for his peers and aspiring shooters.

Occasionally over the past few years Stangel has answered questions and offered “Pro Tips” on his Tumblr to younger photographers who are wondering how to go about building a career in today’s market.

Stangel gave us permission to reprint a couple of our favorite of these pieces on PDNPulse, and has also agreed to field questions from PDN readers for some new installments of his “Pro Tips” columns.

To submit a question for Jake please send an email to editor@pdnonline.com with the subject line “Pro Tips.”

On When to Work With a Rep and When to Just Work Harder

Question: So I’ve worked with some editors and worked for some companies doing small time shoots and small editorial things. My relationship with editors/publications is kind of going much too slow and I don’t feel confident in sending them promo or emailing them and expecting results. Would it be appropriate to find an agent? I feel confident in my work and abilities but I’m wondering if ever there’s a time to search for representation, would it be now?

What exactly should I be looking for with representation? And what should I be prepared to send them?

Answer: By and large, the appropriate time to search for representation is when you literally can no longer manage shooting and client requests and calendars and making estimates and negotiating various licenses and shoot deliverables all at once.

The other time an agent is helpful is if you’re extraordinarily talented but a recluse, and want someone to be your “face” and leave it up to you to just make photographs. But the key thing here is that you need to be extraordinarily talented. Extraordinarily. Talented. (more…)

November 15th, 2013

Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Award Winners Announced

An interior spread from Karma, photographs by Óscar Monzón (Dalpine, Madrid / RVB Books, Paris) © Óscar Monzón 2013

An interior spread from Karma, photographs by Óscar Monzón (Dalpine, Madrid / RVB Books, Paris) © Óscar Monzón 2013

The winners of the 2013 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards were announced this evening in Paris.

The self-published book A01 [COD.19.1.1.43] — A27 [S | COD.23] by Rosângela Rennó was named PhotoBook of the Year. The book considers the disappearance due to theft of the material in 27 archival boxes housed in the General Archive of the City of in Rio de Janeiro.

KARMA by Óscar Monzón (RVB Books, Paris / Dalpine, Madrid) is the winner of $10,000 First PhotoBook prize. KARMA is comprised of photographs of automobiles and their drivers made in Madrid between 2009 and 2013. (more…)

November 15th, 2013

Head of Kodak Alaris Tells Lomographers: Film Lives

In a move to reassure a large base of film buyers, Kodak Alaris President of Personalized Imaging Dennis Olbrich issued an open letter to members of the Lomographic Society yesterday. Olbrich told the international group of analogue camera enthusiasts that the Eastman Kodak spinoff is “as committed to preserving your Kodak Moments as we ever were!”

Kodak Alaris, Olbrich wrote, will continue to manufacture film and photographic paper and development chemicals, and will also continue to offer their instant printing kiosks.

Read the full letter on the Lomography site.

November 14th, 2013

Shortlist for $109K Prix Pictet Announced

An image from Mishka Henner's series "Beef & Oil" on the Prix Pictet website.

An image from Mishka Henner’s series “Beef & Oil” on the Prix Pictet website.

The shortlist for the fifth Prix Pictet was announced last night in Paris. Kofi Annan, the former secretary-general of the United Nations, will announce the winner of the CHF 100,000 (approx. $109,218 US) prize, which will be awarded to a photography project fitting the theme “consumption,” on May 21, 2014 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

The 11 shortlisted photographers and projects were selected by an independent jury from a pool of more than 650 nominations.

The Shortlisted photographers are: Adam Bartos of the United States, who was nominated for his project “Yard Sale”; Motoyuki Daifu of Japan, nominated for “Family”; Rineke Dijkstra of the Netherlands, nominated for “Almerisa”; Hong Hao of China, nominated for “My Things”; Mishka Henner of Belgium, nominated for “Beef & Oil”; Juan Fernando Herrán of Colombia, nominated for “Escalas”; Boris Mikhailov of Ukraine, nominated for “Tea, Coffee & Cappuccino”; Abraham Oghobase of Nigeria, nominated for “Untitled 2012”; Michael Schmidt of Germany, nominated for “Lebensmittel”; Allan Sekula (who died in August of this year) of the United States, nominated for “Fish Story”; and Laurie Simmons of the United States, nominated for “The Love Doll.”

In addition to awarding the prize, the Pictet & Cie, the Geneva-based bank that founded the prize in 2008, will award a commission to one of the nominees to create a project in an area of the world where the Pictet Group supports a sustainability project.

Previous Prix Pictet winners include Luc Delahaye, Mitch Epstein, Benoit Aquin and Nadav Kander.