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August 22nd, 2014

Yale Research Group Launches Fascinating Search Platform for 170k FSA-OWI Images

Image caption: Modern riverboat, St. Louis, Missouri, 1940, by John Vachon.

Modern riverboat, St. Louis, Missouri, 1940, by John Vachon.

Screen shot 2014-08-21 at 6.32.37 PM

An image of the Photogrammar’s map tool, which visualizes the quantities of images FSA-OWI photographers made in regions around the country.

A group of researchers at Yale created “a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).”

The platform, which they’re calling Photogrammar, allows people to use visual tools to search through the digitized photographs from the FSA-OWI archive, which is housed at the Library of Congress. The map tool, for instance, allows users to see the quantity of images made in regions across the United States. One can also use the map to trace the work of individual photographers such as Dorothea Lange, John Collier and Marion Post Wolcott, and see where they worked and produced the most images.

The Treemap, another visualization, uses colored blocks of different sizes to show the number of images of different types FSA-OWI photographers produced in different category topics. Users can drill down into subtopics of the category topics.

The Photogrammar also features a more traditional keyword-driven search function.

Explore the Photogrammar site here. But fair warning: it will suck you in.

Related: 14 Rare Color Photos From the FSA-OWI

August 20th, 2014

Aaron Siskind Foundation Announces 2014 Grant Recipients

The Aaron Siskind Foundation announced the five winners of their 2014 Individual Photographer’s Fellowship grants yesterday. The grant recipients are Lucas Foglia, Curran Hatleberg, Gillian Laub, Peter van Agtmael and Tomas van Houtryve. Each of this year’s winners receives an $8,000 award.

There were two rounds of judging for this year’s IPF grants. The first round judges included curator Elisabeth Biondi, Harper’s Magazine Art Director Stacey D. Clarkson and Alexa Dilworth, of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Photographer Elinor Carucci, Curatorial Assistance CEO Graham Howe, and Morgan Library Curator of Photography Joel Smith were the final round judges.

The IPF program was started in 1991, the same year that the Foundation was created, in keeping with photographer Aaron Siskind’s request that upon his death his estate be used to support and inspire contemporary photography. The grants are open to photographers of all levels who reside in the U.S. and are 21 years of age or older, as long as their work is “based on the idea of the lens-based image,” according to the Foundation’s website. Awards of up to $10,000 have been given every year since the IPF’s inception—with the exception of 1999, 2002, 2003 and 2006. Past recipients have included Gregory Crewdson, Matt Eich, Lisa Elmaleh, Ashley Gilbertson, Ron Jude, Wayne Lawrence, Jenny Riffle and Joshua Lutz.

Related: Out West: Lucas Foglia’s Frontcountry
Tomas van Houtryve Drone Essay Longest Ever Published by Harper’s
Heroes & Mentors: Tina Barney and Gillian Laub

August 5th, 2014

Photogs Marcus Bleasdale, Steve Ringman Win Environmental Journalism Awards

The Society of Environmental Journalists announced their 2014 awards for reporting on the environment yesterday. Seattle Times staffer Steve Ringman and VII’s Marcus Bleasdale were among the honorees.

Ringman was recognized for his work with writer Craig Allen Welch on “Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn,” the Seattle Times‘ multi-part investigation of ocean acidification and its impacts on the Pacific Ocean. (PDN spoke with Ringman and the Seattle Times about the creation of the “Sea Change” for our December 2013 issue. Read that feature here.) Ringman and Welch received the Kevin Carmody Award for Outstanding In-depth Reporting for a large market publication, the top award given by SEJ.

Bleasdale received the award for Outstanding Environmental Photojournalism for “The Price of Precious,” his story on conflict mineral mining in Congo, which was published by National Geographic. (PDN featured Bleasdale’s long-term project on conflict minerals in our December 2013 issue. Read that story here.)

Second place in the Environmental Photojournalism category went to J. Carl Ganter, Matt Black and Brian Lehmann for their photographs examining the effects of water scarcity, published in Circle of Blue. Jenny E. Ross received a third place mention for her photo essay on polar bears, published by Natural History magazine.

The awards will be given out during a ceremony at the SEJ’s annual conference, which takes place in New Orleans in early September.

Related: MSNBC.com: A Place for Serious Photo Stories (Subscribers only)

July 14th, 2014

Chicago Photographer Murdered In Apparent Case of Mistaken Identity

Wil Lewis, a 28-year-old photographer, was shot and killed in broad daylight on Saturday afternoon as he waited for a bus in the Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago, according to reports from the Chicago Sun-Times and Chicago Tribune.

Police have arrested a man in the shooting, charging him with first degree murder.

Lewis’s father told the Tribune that police believe Lewis was mistaken for someone else. “Somebody basically shot him dead. They felt it was a case of mistaken identity. Wil was not in the wrong,” he told the paper.

Born in Guatemala, Lewis was adopted at age 7 and grew up in California and Wisconsin. Lewis, a graduate of Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, had worked as a photo assistant and digital tech for Kohl’s, Sears, Blackbox Visual and other clients. He opened his own studio, Wil Photography, in 2009. A friend told the Sun-Times that Lewis was due to begin a new job as a photographer at an online men’s clothing retailer this week. He and his wife, an art director at ad agency Leo Burnett, were expected to celebrate their second wedding anniversary next month.

 

July 3rd, 2014

Photographer Creates Free iPhone App for His Signature Style

New York City-based photographer Alexander Richter has used the Contrast by Hornbeck app to make images of the city's architecture for his Instagram feed.

New York City-based photographer Alexander Richter has used the Contrast by Hornbeck app to make a series of images of the city’s architecture for his Instagram feed. Photo © Alexander Richter

Photographer John Hornbeck couldn’t find a camera app for his phone that came anywhere close to the high-contrast, black-and-white photographs he makes with his camera, and he wasn’t interested in “having to purchase a bunch of add-ons.” Hornbeck, who earns money from his photography but also works in the software industry, decided to collaborate with a friend to build an app that would come close to reproducing his style.

After they finished the app, Contrast by Hornbeck, the photographer used it for a few months before he and the developer decided to “push it out to the public and see if there would be any interest from others.” There has been.

Hornbeck has promoted the app—it’s available for free—via his social media channels, and others have shared it. “I know at least a couple of respected photographers who use it and have told others about it, so it’s just word of mouth and people playing around,” he says. The downloads number “in the thousands,” and several hundred images on Instagram are tagged with the #contrastbyhornbeck hashtag.

The biggest thing this app offers that others don’t, Hornbeck says, is simplicity. Photographers can use it to make high-contrast, black-and-white shots. “That’s all it does and we have no plans to really change that.”

 

June 18th, 2014

NY Times Highlights Instagrammer Working For Met, Other Institutions, For Free

There was an article in the Art & Design section of the New York Times yesterday highlighting the social media photography that an Instagrammer, Dave Krugman, is doing for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York Public Library and other cultural institutions in exchange for special access.

The article is full of language that suggests it’s Mr. Krugman’s great privilege to work for these institutions for free. “The Metropolitan Museum, for instance, allowed Mr. Krugman and his band of Instagram stars into its halls outside of normal business hours,” the author writes. She also quotes Krugman’s own post thanking the Met for the “opportunity.”

These are institutions with resources to pay for the social media communications work they do. Krugman isn’t a photographer by trade, he’s a retoucher, the article says. But he’s allowing these institutions to pay what the market will bear for this work: zero.

It would be interesting to know what the photographers and photo editors on the New York Times‘s staff think of this article devaluing the work of photographers.

“With his growing reputation, Mr. Krugman has begun thinking about charging money for his Instagram services,” the article concludes. Will these venerable and wealthy institutions pay, though, or will they just hire the next person with a big Instagram following who doesn’t know enough about the business of advertising and communications to charge for his or her work?

June 12th, 2014

Todd Hido Shoots Fall 2014 Campaign For Victoria Beckham’s Fashion Line

An image from Todd Hido's campaign for Victoria, Victoria Beckham's Fall 2014 collection.

An image from Todd Hido’s campaign for Victoria, Victoria Beckham’s Fall 2014 collection.

We never thought we’d mention Posh Spice and Todd Hido in the same sentence, but here goes: Victoria Beckham (previously known as pop singer Posh Spice) enlisted fine-art photographer Todd Hido to photograph ads her Fall 2014 collection of women’s fashion.

The images of models wearing Beckham’s looks recall Hido’s fine-art photographs of women in motel rooms who appear to be living on society’s fringes. In images on the fashion designer’s website we see models posed on bare mattresses or in rooms with shabby carpeting and unmade beds. Hido’s work for the label also appears to include video pieces. In one video we see a model standing against a wall in a dark room while fuzz flashes across the screen of an old-model television set.

Hido didn’t respond to our request for comment. According to W Magazine, Beckham herself said that, “Working with a photographer who doesn’t traditionally shoot fashion really enriched how I could portray the collection this season.”

Related: The Prevailing Wind: Todd Hido’s Excerpts from Silver Meadows

May 21st, 2014

German Photographer Michael Schmidt Awarded $112,500 Prix Pictet

From "Lebensmittel," Michael Schmidt's series on food production and consumption.

From “Lebensmittel,” Michael Schmidt’s series on food production and consumption.

Michael Schmidt was awarded the fifth Prix Pictet, a photography prize worth $112,500, in a ceremony this evening at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The award is sponsored by Swiss wealth managers the Pictet Group.

Schmidt was recognized for his long-term project “Lebensmittel,” translated as “food stuff,” which he made between 2006 and 2010. Sir David King, the jury chair, called Schmidt’s project “an epic and hugely topical investigation into the ways in which we feed ourselves,” according to a press release issued by the Prix Pictet organization. The Prix Pictet honors photographers whose work examines critical social and environmental issues, and the theme for this iteration of the prize was “Consumption.”

The shortlisted photographers included Adam Bartos (United States), Motoyuki Daifu (Japan), Rineke Dijkstra (The Netherlands), Hong Hao (China), Mishka Henner (Belgium), Juan Fernando Herrán (Colombia), Boris Mikhailov (Ukraine), Abraham Oghobase (Nigeria), Michael Schmidt (Germany), Allan Sekula (United States) and Laurie Simmons (United States).

Kofi Annan, the former UN secretary-general and honorary president of Prix Pictet, praised the shortlisted photographers for their “powerful images that ought to persuade governments, businesses—and each of us as individual consumers—of the need for a fundamental rethink of the principles on which present-day affluence is founded. The issue of unsustainable consumption, and in particular food and nutrition security, is not simply at the forefront of the global political stage, it is now firmly on the personal agenda of each and every one of us.”

Previous winners include Benoît Aquin, Nadav Kander, Mitch Epstein and Luc Delahaye.

The jury for the fifth Prix Pictet included: Sir King, chairman, UK Foreign Secretary’s Special Representative for Climate Change (SRCC); Peter Aspden, arts writer, Financial Times; Luc Delahaye, photographer; Fumio Nanjo, director, Mori Art Museum; Loa Haagen Pictet, art consultant & curator; Martin Barnes, senior curator of photographs, Victoria and Albert Museum; Wang Shu, architect; Elisabeth Sussman, curator of photography, Whitney Museum of American Art.

An exhibition of the work of the shortlisted photographers opens tomorrow at the Victoria and Albert Museum, where it will show through June 14, 2014.

May 13th, 2014

Photojournalist Camille Lepage, 26, “Murdered” in Central African Republic

In her most recent post on Instagram on May 6, slain photojournalist Camille Lepage shared a photograph of people she was traveling with and details about her location.

In her most recent post on Instagram on May 6, slain photojournalist Camille Lepage shared a photograph of anti balaka [Christian militia] she was traveling with and details about her location.

Camille Lepage, a 26-year-old French photojournalist, has been killed in the Central African Republic, say reports from the Associated Press and Reuters.

According to the Reuters report, citing a statement released today by French President Francois Hollande, Lepage’s body was found when French-affiliated soldiers stopped “a car driven by anti-balaka [Christian militia] groups, in the Bouar region.”

The Associated Press report, citing Lepage’s colleagues, says the photojournalist was caught in fighting “while traveling in a village about 37 miles (60 kilometers) west of Bouar, near the country’s border with Cameroon.”

Lapage, who is from Angers, France, last posted on her social media accounts on May 6. In the caption to a photograph posted to her Instagram she wrote: “Travelling with the Anti Balaka to Amada Gaza, about 120km from Berberati, we left at 3.30am to avoid the Misca checkpoints and it took us 8 hours by motorbike as there is [sic] no proper roads to reach the village. In the region of Amada Gaza, 150 people were killed by the Seleka between March and now. Another attack took place on Sunday killing 6 people, the anti balaka Colonel Rock decides to send his elements there to patrol around and take people who fled to the bush back to their homes safely.”

In addition to covering Central African Republic, LePage had also photographed stories in South Sudan, and had been published in The New York Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, The Guardian and Le Monde among other publications. Lepage had also worked with Medecines Sans Frontiers, Amnesty International, the World Food Program, and other non-governmental organizations.

In their statement, the French President’s office called Lepage’s death a “murder,” saying, “Everything will be done to uncover the circumstances of this assassination and to track down who murdered our compatriot.”

May 12th, 2014

Richard Mosse Wins $50K Deutsche Borse Prize for The Enclave

Richard Mosse, "Safe From Harm," North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, © Richard Mosse, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

Richard Mosse, “Safe From Harm,” North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, © Richard Mosse, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

Richard Mosse has won the 2014 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. The £30,000 award (about $50,000 US) is given annually to a photographer whose photo book or exhibition contributed to the medium of photography in Europe during the previous year. The news was announced this evening during a ceremony in London at The Photographers’ Gallery. Read the full story on PDNOnline.