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September 10th, 2015

Getty and Instagram Announce Winners of $10K Grants For Underreported Stories


An image by Adriana Zehbrauskas, one of the winners of the inaugural Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers using the social media platform to tell underreported stories. Here, a woman holds her daughter before her baptism at Mexico City’s Basílica de Guadalupe.

Getty Images, in partnership with Instagram, have announced three winners of the first annual Getty Images Instagram Grant, which recognizes photographers who’ve used the social media platform to tell underreported stories around the world. The winners, all of whom are experienced professional photographers, have documented communities in Bangladesh, Latin America and Russia. They will each receive $10,000 and mentorship from Getty photojournalists, and their work will be part of an exhibit which opens today at Photoville in Brooklyn, New York.

Brazilian-born photojournalist Adriana Zehbrauskas (@adrianazehbrauskas), who lives in Mexico City and whose clients include The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and The Sunday Times, was recognized for her photographs covering climate change and the everyday lives of Latin Americans. Zehbruskas, who worked as a staff photographer at a Brazilian newspaper for 11 years before moving to Mexico, says she began publishing her work on Instagram “naturally” and that her feed evolved from a place where she shared personal images to a space for professional work. “The fact that you could share something in real time appealed to me, maybe because of my newspaper background,” she told PDN via email. She says Instagram allowed her to “post images that were true to my vision and style” without having to conform to the wishes of a publication. It also allowed her to “build a story over time, in just one place.”

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse.

Ismael Ferdous received a grant in recognition of his project telling stories of the survivors of the 2013 Rana Plaza garment factory collapse. This image depicts the prosthetic leg of Raihan Kabir, who lost his right leg after a machine smashed it during the collapse, trapping him for 14.5 hours in the wreckage.

Documentary photographer Ismail Ferdous won for his project “After Rana Plaza,” which documents the lives of the survivors of the 2013 collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Ferdous created the @afterranaplaza Instagram feed to share those stories. Ferdous has an unusual way of sharing his stories on Instagram, publishing still images with audio commentary from his subjects.


An image of a child with Russian Airborne troops, from Dmitry Markov’s Instagram feed, where he often depicts orphaned and underprivileged children.

Dmitry Markov ( of Pskov, Russia, has used Instagram to share his photographs of orphaned children and highlight the work of charities for which he volunteers, such as the Russian Children’s Fund.

The three recipients were chosen from more than 1,200 photographers in 109 countries, Getty Images said in a statement. Judges for the grants were National Geographic photographer David Guttenfelder; TIME director of photography Kira Pollack; photographers Maggie Steber and Malin Fezehai; and photographer and @everydayiran co-founder Ramin Talaie.

The three recipients “could not better exemplify the original aim of this grant: to document and share stories of underrepresented communities that otherwise rarely come into focus,” said Elodie Mailliet, Getty Images’ Senior Director of Content Partnerships.

Zehbrauskas plans to use the grant money to start a new project creating portraits of the families of 43 students who disappeared from the Ayotzinapa Rural Teachers School last year. Family portraits are important as “a proof of existence, [and in] perpetuating memory and hopefully saving [the missing students] from the fate of being forever forgotten,” Zehbrauskas says.

Beyond the financial award, the recognition for her work “means a great deal,” she adds. “It means that someone is listening to what you have to say, that it is worth it to keep doing it and believing in it.”

Related: Picture Story: Everyday Africa on Instagram
Are Visual Storytelling Platforms a Good Thing for Photographers? (PDN subscribers only; login required)
PDN Video: Ruddy Roye on Instagram, Storytelling, and Risking the “Angry Black Man” Label
New Instagram Feed Highlights Effects of Climate Change

August 24th, 2015

What New Federal Trade Commission Guides Mean For Instagram Influencers

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued new guidelines regarding paid endorsements that photographers should be aware of—especially if they’re being paid to promote products on their Instagram feeds. This summer the FTC updated Guides to Section 5 of the FTC Act to add guidelines about how “Instagram influencers” and bloggers should identify any company or product they’ve been paid to promote.

Put simply, the Guides insist that if you are being compensated to endorse a company, product or event, you should say so. “The Guides, at their core, reflect the basic truth-in-advertising principle that endorsements must be honest and not misleading,” the FTC states.

According to the Guides, there are no fines for violations of the FTC Act. However, “law enforcement actions can result in orders requiring the defendants in the case to give up money they received from their violations.” Not to mention legal fees.

In the FAQ section, the FTC addresses blogs and social media specifically. “Truth in advertising is important in all media,” the Commission writes, “whether they have been around for decades (like, television and magazines) or are relatively new (like, blogs and social media).” (more…)

August 5th, 2015

Inaugural Seattle Art Fair Brings Attention to Under-the-Radar Collector Base


Photo courtesy of the Seattle Art Fair.

More than 60 galleries from across the country and as far afield as Hong Kong participated this past weekend in the first edition of the Seattle Art Fair. Co-organized by Microsoft founder Paul Allen’s Vulcan Inc. and Brooklyn-based art fair producers Art Market Productions, drew more than 15,000 attendees and generated sales that pleased many galleries.

The positive results highlighted what many local and national galleries already knew: that Seattle boasts an important group of collectors, some well-established and others who are beginning to build collections and, thanks to a growing economy and a robust tech sector, have the means to do so. Robert Goff, a director at David Zwirner in New York, says the gallery participated because they feel Seattle is “a good place to build a foundation.” (more…)

July 29th, 2015

Video Pick: Rep Maren Levinson: Being a Good Photographer Isn’t Enough

Seattle-based photographer John Keatley recently posted a video interview he did with his rep, Redeye’s Maren Levinson, in which she touched on several changes to the photography industry. Her frank assessment of the market in which professional photographers and their reps operate has earned the video nearly 30,000 views on YouTube. (more…)

July 22nd, 2015

Alec Soth Offering Free “Winnebago Workshop” To Teen Artists


Photographer Alec Soth and his Little Brown Mushroom (LBM) publishing imprint recently announced a hiatus from bookmaking to pursue a new initiative: The Winnebago Workshop, “a mobile classroom that puts artists with teens to create multimedia stories.”

The first free, weeklong workshop is coming up during the week of August 17–22, and Soth and LBM are currently seeking applications from artists age 16–18 who’d like to “drive wherever the wind blows us” and work on storytelling projects.

According to LBM’s Galen Fletcher, Soth’s own teen experiences with art were part of the inspiration to launch the workshops, which are supported by a Knight Foundation grant. “[He] wants to offer an experience that could make that significant of an impact on other teen artists,” Fletcher said in an email to PDN.

Another factor was the success of LBM’s “Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers,” which invited photographers, writers and designers to exchange ideas about storytelling in a setting described as ‘more summer camp than classroom.'”

The Winnebago Workshop application asks applicants to submit artwork, a self-portrait, a story that gives a sense of their personality and a description of their “dream field trip.”

Applications are due by August 3.

Related: Collaborative Duos: Alec Soth and Brad Zellar Explore What Community Means Today
Alec Soth on Wandering, Storytelling and Robert Adams vs. Weegee
The Great American Songbook

July 13th, 2015

Pulitzer Center Announces $1 Million Fund for Multimedia Journalism Projects

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting has announced the Catalyst Fund, a new initiative that will support “as many as 40” multimedia journalism projects in the next two years with $1 million in grants made to journalists working with major news outlets.

In addition to supporting the production of multimedia reportage, the Fund will also support journalists in their efforts to disseminate projects to students through presentations at schools and via the Pulitzer Center website.

The Fund is supported by donations from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Kendeda Fund, and from individual donors.

“The Pulitzer Center is a leader among a growing field of nonprofit news organizations bringing creative models of production and dissemination to a disrupted news industry,” said Kathy Im, Director of MacArthur Foundation’s Journalism and Media program, in a statement.

The Pulitzer Center says it has already committed Catalyst Fund support to projects that will be published by The New York Times, National Geographic, MSNBC and other outlets.

Journalists interested in applying for Catalyst Fund grants are encouraged to apply through the Pulitzer Center’s grants portal, here:

Related: Q&A: How to Get Funding From The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

July 10th, 2015

Shortlist for $105K Prix Pictet Announced

Alixandra Fazzina was shortlisted for “A Million Shillings—Escape from Somalia,” her long-term project documenting migrants and refugees from Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. © Prix Pictet Ltd 2015

Alixandra Fazzina was shortlisted for “A Million Shillings—Escape from Somalia,” her long-term project documenting migrants and refugees from Somalia and the Arabian Peninsula. © Prix Pictet Ltd 2015

The organizers of the Prix Pictet today announced the 12 photographers on the shortlist for the sixth cycle of the award, which was founded by Swiss private bank Pictet Group. At CHF 100,000 CHF ($105,487), the Prix Pictet is one of the richest prizes for photography.

Each of the six cycles of the Prix Pictet have centered on a particular theme related to sustainability. The theme for the sixth Prix Pictet is Disorder. In a statement announcing the theme at a reception in November 2014, Prix Pictet chair Stephen Barber said: “The eternal struggle between order and chaos is the central tension of our times. Throughout the world there are examples of attempts to impose order without a clear understanding of the long-term consequences of so doing. With each passing day the illusion of order is shattered in a thousand different ways.” Previous themes have included Consumption, Power, Growth, Earth and Water.

The shortlisted photographers for the 2015 prize are: Ilit Azoulay (Israel); Valérie Belin (France); Matthew Brandt (U.S.); Maxim Dondyuk (Ukraine); Alixandra Fazzina (U.K.); Ori Gersht (Israel); John Gossage (U.S.); Pieter Hugo (South Africa); Gideon Mendel (South Africa); Sophie Ristelhueber (France); Brent Stirton (South Africa); Yang Yongliang (China). (more…)

July 9th, 2015

Sotheby’s and eBay Partner to Make Rare Photo Prints Avail to Auction Site’s Audience

A print of Ormond Gigli's "Lips" is estimated to fetch between $10,000-$15,000.

A print of Ormond Gigli’s photograph “Lips” is estimated to fetch between $10,000-$15,000.

While people can bid in-person during the July 22 Sotheby’s auction, Contemporary Living—Photographs, Prints & Design, they’ll be competing with eBay users from all over the world for prints by the likes of Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, Sally Mann, Araki and many other greats. eBay users have had access to certain Sotheby’s auctions since the brick-and-mortar auction house and popular auction site announced their partnership in April of this year.

“Everyone—regardless of their location—will see the same item offered in the Sotheby’s New York salesroom and on eBay simultaneously and have the ability to bid online in real time,” said eBay Director of Emerging Verticals and Live Auctions Megan Ford, in a written statement issued to PDN. “The Contemporary Living sale is especially exciting for the wide variety of work from renowned artists, photographers, and designers.”

Among the many auction highlights is “Talmont II, Frankreich,” a mural-sized photograph by Elger Esser that has an estimate of $20,000–$30,000; “Kusho #2,” an image by Shinichi Maruyama estimated at $15,000–$25,000; Sally Mann’s “Untitled (Deep South #20),” estimated at $10,000–$15,000, and “Shipbreaking #50, Chittagong, Bangladesh,” by Edward Burtynsky, estimated at $10,000–$15,000. Uneditioned prints by Garry Winogrand, Daido Moriyama, Ruth Bernhard, O. Winston Link, Francesca Woodman, and Sebastião Salgado are on offer for estimated prices between $2,500 and $30,000.

Shinichi Maruyama's mural-sized print of "Kusho #2" is expected to sell for between $15,000-$20,000.

Shinichi Maruyama’s mural-sized print of “Kusho #2” is expected to sell for between $15,000-$20,000.

Existing eBay users and those new to eBay can register here to bid or follow the auction. The general public can also preview the sale without registering.

Related: Photographers Could Get Royalties on Auction Sales Under Proposed Federal Bill
Managing Your Inventory of Limited-Edition Prints

June 16th, 2015

Video Pick: “Denali,” Film About Photographer Ben Moon and His Dog, Goes Viral

Denali from FELT SOUL MEDIA on Vimeo.

Our cover story last September was about DamNation, a film about dam removal and river restoration by director Ben Knight and the production company Felt Soul Media, which he cofounded with Travis Rummel. Outdoor apparel and equipment company Patagonia commissioned that film because the company’s founder, Yvon Chouinard, is an advocate for dam removal and river restoration. In our article, Knight predicted that we’d see more companies sponsoring documentary films about issues that matter to them. That relationship has continued, with Patagonia supporting Felt Soul Media’s latest short film, Denali, about photographer Ben Moon and his dog.

The seven-minute video, which Moon produced, chronicles the relationship between he and Denali, both of whom suffered through bouts of cancer with support from the other. It tells their story from Denali’s perspective, which is both charming and incredibly moving.

There is a very good chance at this point that you’ve seen or at least heard about the film. It has 8.2 million views since June 8 and was a Vimeo Staff Pick. But if not, we suggest you take the time to watch it with a best friend and a box of tissues.

Also: We hear Ben Moon will be speaking about building a photography career at PhotoPlus Expo this year. Maybe he’ll even tell a dog story or two.

Related: DamNation Documents the National Debate Over Dam Removals and River Restoration

June 9th, 2015

Free Photo Publication for Chicago Commuters Wins $10K Crusade Engagement Grant

A prototype of ".LDOC," a newsprint publication featuring the work of local Chicago photographers and writers.

A prototype of “.LDOC,” a newsprint publication featuring the work of local Chicago photographers and writers.

A free, Chicago-based newsprint publication featuring photo essays and creative writing won the second annual $10,000 Crusade Engagement Grant from Crusade For Art, the non-profit arts organization. Crusade for Art announced the grant this morning.

Danielle and Joseph Wilcox came up with the idea of producing a weekly newsprint publication and handing it out to commuters on Chicago’s Red Line train, which runs from the North Side to the South Side of the city. The publication, called “.LDOC,” will showcase the work of local photographers and writers.

“Our target audience, the 9-5 Chicago employee, would have ‘.LDOC’ with them on their way to and/or from work, creating for them a moment of respite, artistic awareness, and, as Picasso says, a moment to wash away the dust from everyday life,” the Wilcoxes wrote in their grant application.

“LDOC was the proposal that best balanced effective cost management and distribution with artistic quality,” said Brian Sholis, Associate Curator of Photography at Cincinnati Museum of Art and one of the grant jurors, in a statement. “It imagined a captive, repeat audience for the publication and has the potential for long-term sustainability. It is an ambitious but exciting project.”

The grant’s other jurors were Feature Shoot editor Alison Zavos and RAYKO Photo Center gallery director Ann Jastrab.

Related: How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects
New $10K Grant Will Send Newborn Babies Home From Hospital As Photo Collectors