World War I was notable for being the first major war documented with motion pictures, but still photography still played an important role.

The Great War just published this interesting video exploring the role of British war photographer, Ernest Brooks.

Brooks was the only professional photographer at the Battle of the Somme and chronicled battles in many theaters. But unlike much conflict photography today, Brooks wasn’t engaged in straight documentary work–his images were often used by the UK government for propaganda purposes and many of the more gruesome elements of the conflict were hidden from view, at least initially. But Brooks was a prodigious shooter and, as the war dragged on, did record many of its mud-and-blood-soaked horrors.

Via: Digital Rev


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