Q&A with Michael Hejtmanek, President of Hasselblad Americas on Breaking the Medium Format Mold

Posted by on Wednesday June 22, 2016 | Camera

X1D_Front

With the X1D, Hasselblad is attempting to redefine the medium format category.

We sat down briefly with U.S. President Michael Hejtmanek for his take on the camera and its place in the Hasselblad universe. What follows is a condensed version of the talk that’s been edited for length and clarity.

On new lenses for the X1D

“We’re going to be very aggressive out of the gate with lenses for the camera,” Hejtmanek says. First up will be a 30mm f/3.5 at Photokina, “then we’ll get feedback to see what’s next.”

On the X1D’s limited video capability at launch

“We want to see how the market will use it for video,”Hejtmanek says. “It’s a still camera with video functions, but we can improve the feature set with feedback from our users. We’re very excited to see what people will do with video—it’s 1080p but it will look and feel very different than what people are used to.”

While some of the X1D’s video features can be changed via firmware, the 1080p video can’t be upgraded to 4K, he adds.

On why Hasselblad built the X1D

The goal wasn’t to build a camera that users would use in lieu of the H6D or other medium format backs but one that would tempt mirrorless shooters to step up to medium format, he says. “This gives them a way to buy a medium format camera that looks and feels like a compact camera.”

What it is not, Hejtmanek stressed, is the Hasselblad name on another manufacturer’s product. “This was conceived by and built by Sweden, through and through. It’s the camera our engineers have wanted to build—it’s the pinnacle of our development. We’ve created the future of medium format. We’ve redefined it.”

Read: Early hands-on with the Hasselblad X1D


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

How an iPhone 7 Compares to an Arri Alexa

Posted by on Wednesday May 17, 2017 | Camera

Spoiler alert: not well. Smartphone image quality has improved rapidly over the past few years, creating a fun sub-genre of YouTube videos pitting smartphones against vastly more expensive cameras. (Watch, for instance, how the iPhone 7 compares to a Red Weapon.) In this video, via Potato Jet, we have what may be the toughest comparison... More

Photojournalists Demand Encrypted Cameras

Posted by on Wednesday December 14, 2016 | Camera, Photojournalism

Hacking is much in the news of late, but the Freedom of the Press Foundation is concerned about a less visible, yet no-less-vital, aspect of information security: the security of digital cameras. Or, more accurately, the lack thereof. The Foundation has published a letter from over 150 documentary filmmakers and photographers that calls on the major... More