Nina Berman Wins 2016 Aftermath Grant For Project on War’s Toxic Legacy

Posted by on Tuesday December 22, 2015 | Uncategorized

Nina Berman has won the 2016 Aftermath Project Grant for “Acknowledgment of Danger,” a look at the “toxic legacy of war on the American landscape.” Berman, a documentary photographer, has published two books: Purple Hearts—Back from Iraq (2004), on wounded veterans; and Homeland (2008), a look at surveillance and paranoia in post 9/11 America. Sara Terry, photographer and founder of The Aftermath Project, announced the news on social media today.

The Aftermath Project, a nonprofit, supports the production of projects on “the lingering wounds of war” and communities recovering from conflict. Past winners of the Aftermath Project Grant include Stanley Greene, Andrew Lichtenstein and Justyna Mielnikiewicz. In August 2015, Terry announced the 2016 grant would be the last the organization would offer “for the time being.” In the coming year, the organization will “concentrate on our tenth anniversary and strategize our way forward.”

In addition to naming the 2016 grant winner, the judges also chose several finalists:

Juan Arredondo for his project, “Everybody Needs a Good Neighbor,” about the challenges faced by ex-combatants transitioning back to civilian life in Colombia, as the nation prepares for a historic peace agreement between the government and FARC in March, 2016.

Bharat Choudhary for his project, “The Silence of Others,” which examines the aftermath of the war on terror and its disastrous psychological impact on young Muslims living in the West.

Paolo Marchetti for his project “FEVER: The Awakening of European Fascism,” which documents the growing racial intolerance – exacerbated by the economic crisis and by political ideologues – expressed by many young people reacting against the massive flow of immigrants to Europe.

Brian McCarty for his project, “War Toys,” a conceptual art/photography project. With the help of expressive therapists, McCarty works with the children to make narrative photographs that recreate their experiences using locally found toys.

The judges for the 2016 grants were Terry; Denise Wolff, an editor with Aperture; photographer (and former Aftermath Project board member) Jeff Jacobson; photographer Maggie Steber; and Elizabeth Rappaport, a photographer and Aftermath Project board member.

Related Articles
Project on Ukraine Wins $20,000 2015 Aftermath Grant

Post 9/11 War Business Projects Wins $20K Aftermath Project Grant for 2014

How to Win Grants That Support Your Photo Projects (interview with Sara Terry)


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