Zun Lee’s Polaroid Archive Preserves African-American Self-Representation

Posted by on Wednesday August 26, 2015 | Photojournalism

© Zun Lee

The @faderesistance Instagram feed.

Photographer Zun Lee is dedicated to countering stereotypical, often negative views of the African-American family. While he was working on Father Figure, his book about African-American fathers, he stumbled on some old Polaroids that appeared to have fallen from a family photo album. He was intrigued to see how the Polaroids —”the Instagrams of their day,” he calls them — reflected “the way black people saw themselves in private spaces and in ways not intended to be seen, or judged, by others.” By searching yard sales and e-Bay, Lee has amassed 3,000 of these now “orphaned” mementoes and recently began posting them on a Tumbler and an Instagram feed named “Fade Resistance.”  After winning a Magnum Foundation Fellowship last week, Lee now plans to develop his Fade Resistance collection into an interactive digital archive that will allow the public and collaborators from other disciplines to add their own stories, videos and images. His long-term goal, he says, is “to encourage new ways of understanding black identity and representation in today’s world.”

courtesy of @faderesistance/Zun Lee Photo

A Polaroid as it appears on the @faderesistance feed.

The title of the project, Fade Resistance, echoes a phrase critic bell hooks used in an essay about vernacular African-American photography, in which she wrote that these snapshots are “sites of resistance” against pervasive stereotypical and racist depictions of African Americans. That the images were shot on Polaroid film appeals to Lee for a few reasons. First, he says, the instant cameras gave image makers the power to make their own narratives, without relying on a photographer or a lab. Also, the objects are one-of-a-kind, therefore more precious and fleeting, making preservation more urgent. In his proposal for the Magnum Foundation Fellowship, Lee wrote, “What had to happen to these families that they were no longer able to hold on to these valuable documents?” Lee scans the images as well as the notes written on the bottom or back of some images, which provide some clues to the subjects, and invite speculation: We can only wonder what happened to the man who wrote, “To Evelyn with love, hope and respect. Norris Turner. Good things come to those who wait. I’ve been waiting long enough (smile).”

On the @faderesistance Instagram feed, people frequently comment on the locations visible in the background of the images, as well as the hairstyles and clothing seen in the photos, which date from the 1970s to the early 2000s. Expanding the archive and its reach can help widen the search for more information about the stories behind each photo.

The Fellowship will allow Lee to work with the Brown Institute at Columbia University and collaborate with programmers on the development of the archive. In the future, he says, “multi-disciplinary collaboration would not only happen in the digital realm. I’m envisioning not just traditional print shows, but multimedia installations of this work in the future.”

The project may take years. Lee tells PDN, “I have a feeling this archive will be the gift that keeps on giving.” Until the interactive archive is complete, we can view —and enjoy—the photos of graduations, parties, beach outings and proud parents on Lee’s Tumblr and Instagram feed, and perhaps be reminded of our own special moments circa 1989.

Related articles

Magnum Foundation Grants 2 Fellowships to Support Collaborative Documentary Projects

The Father Figure

PDN’s 30 2014: Zun Lee


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

PDN Video: Natalie Keyssar on Sexism in the Photo Industry

Posted by on Monday September 18, 2017 | Photojournalism

  Photojournalist Natalie Keyssar discusses how women (and photographers of color) are denied the same opportunities as white men in the photo industry, and why that needs to change. “It robs everyone, including white men, of the ability to understand other perspectives. In such a terribly polarized country as we’re in today, lack of empathy... More

Photojournalist Covering Rohingya Crisis for GEO Detained by Bangladeshi Authorities

Posted by on Friday September 15, 2017 | Photojournalism

Photographer Minzayar Oo, who was reporting on the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh on assignment for GEO magazine, was detained with his assistant Hkun Lat on September 7, according to Oo’s agency, Panos Pictures. The two men have been accused of espionage. Police say the journalists entered the country on tourist visas rather than journalist visas, and... More

No More Excuses: Diversify Launches Database of Photographers of Color

Posted by on Wednesday September 13, 2017 | Photojournalism, Social Media/Web

The home page of Diversify.Photo.

After five months of planning, Diversify Photo today launched a database of 340 photographers of color from around the U.S. Brent Lewis, senior photo editor at ESPN’s The Undefeated, told PDN in May that he and independent photo editor Andrea Wise had begun compiling the database to show photo editors, art buyers and other creatives... More