You invest more than just your photos when you use services like Dropbox or Adobe’s Creative Cloud. Sensitive data, such as your location, private communications and more, gets transmitted to third party servers every day.

Every year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation surveys key tech firms to judge just how diligently they safeguard your privacy. Companies are judged across five criteria: whether they follow industry-accepted best practices when it comes to privacy protection (i.e. do they require a warrant before handing over communications), whether they tell users about government data demands, whether they disclose policies on data retention, whether they discloses government content removal requests and whether they have a “pro-user” policy of no “backdoors” to allow government surveillance.

This year, several firms used heavily by the photo community earned five stars–a perfect score. Among them were Adobe, Apple, Dropbox, Yahoo! and WordPress.

Social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Pinterest didn’t fare as well though they still beat out Google, which is aggressively courting photographers with its new Google Photos storage service.

You can read the full report here or get the nickel version from the EFF’s graphic below.

Screen Shot 2015-06-18 at 5.53.51 PM


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Instagram Tips from Pot Photographer Kristen Angelo

Posted by on Friday May 12, 2017 | Business, Social Media/Web

© Kristen Angelo

Kristen Angelo, a.k.a. A Pot Farmer’s Daughter, explains in the May issue of PDN how she built her editorial and commercial photography business around the rapidly expanding cannabis industry. Her Instagram feed has been an important part of her marketing strategy. Angelo says she used hashtags such as #cannabis, #cannabisculture, #i502 (the name of the... More

Instagram’s New Algorithm Has Been Great… for Instagram

Posted by on Monday May 1, 2017 | Social Media/Web

When Instagram announced last year that it was abandoning its chronological posting in favor of an algorithmically determined newsfeed, many photographers were displeased. Despite the online outrage, Instagram’s shift appears to have delivered the goods. According to TechCrunch’s Josh Constine, the platform’s “growth rate spiked, sharing per user increased, and Instagram has added 200 million monthly... More

Instagram “Pods” Are the New Bots

Posted by on Friday April 21, 2017 | Social Media/Web

Ever since Instagram moved its feed from a straightforward chronological posting scheme to an algorithmically sorted, Facebook-style presentation, users have been looking for ways to grow or even just maintain their engagement with their followers. Bots that scoured the network liking and commenting on a user’s behalf to drive up followers have a mixed reputation... More