Molhem Barakat, the 18-year-old Reuters stringer who was killed in Syria on December 20, had told another photographer that Reuters paid him $100 a day for uploading a set of 10 pictures, according to a report on Global Voices.

Barakat also told the photographer, Prague-based photojournalist Stanislav Krupar, that Reuters paid him a bonus of $50 to $100 if his photos were published by The New York Times or the newspaper’s Lens Blog.

Reuters avoided answering questions from a BBC reporter about whether or not Reuters checked to see if Barakat was a minor before paying him for his work in a war zone, or if the agency provided him with a flak jacket, helmet or any hostile environment training.

The Global Voices article also offers information Barakat gave to another reporter about why he had to remain in Aleppo. Barakat was the twenty-third journalist killed this year in Syria, according to Committee to Protect Journalists.

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