Pedro Guerrero, a fine art and architecture photographer best known for his association with architect Frank Lloyd Wright, died yesterday at home in Florence, Arizona, according to reports in The New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He was 95.

An art school dropout, Guerrero arrived unannounced at Wright’s winter home in Scottsdale, Arizona one day in 1939 and introduced himself as a photographer. He presented a thin portfolio, and Wright took notice of several nudes, according to The New York Times. Wright took Guerrero under his wing, and Guerrero spent the next 20 years interpreting Lloyd’s work, until the architect died in 1959.

The partnership made Guerrero’s career, and led to assignments for a number of magazines, including Harper’s Bazaar, House and Garden and other magazines. He photographed buildings by other architects, including Philip Johnson, Eero Saarinen, and Marcel Breuer, but projects for Lloyd always took precedence during Lloyd’s lifetime. After Lloyd died, Guerrero also photographed work by sculptors Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson.

Guerrero was born in Casa Grande, Arizona in 1917, and grew up in Mesa. He attended Art Center School (now Art Center College of Design in Pasadena), studying photography there briefly before returning home to Arizona. His father, a sign painter, pushed him to “quit lazing around the house” and go introduce himself to Wright, according to The New York Times.


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