Your Cellphone Is Not Your Friend, and Other Security Tips For Conflict Zones

The surveillance of journalists covering Syria has heightened concern about the risks journalists face in relying on mobile communications and cellphones. In February, journalists Remi Ochlick and Marie Colvin were killed when shells struck the press center that they and other journalists were using to transmit their stories; the Syrian army may have used satellite signals from the center to target it.

More recently the Committee to Protect Journalists reported that  Syrian security agents in October arrested a British journalist, seizing his laptop, cellphone, camera and video he had shot while interviewing anti-government Syrian activists; several of these dissidents have been arrested, one has fled the country and another has disappeared.

In the wake of these incidents, as well as attacks on journalists and their sources elsewhere, several journalism organizations have been hammering on the need for journalists to take precautions when using cellphones and laptops in certain areas, to protect the contact information they store electronically, and to make sure their communications are secure.

Several guides to protecting and encrypting your data are available online for free:

- The 2012 edition of CPJ’s Journalist Security Guide from CPJ has added chapters on how to protect your communications from surveillance and secure your data. You can download the guide here.

- SaferMobile.org, a non-profit helping journalists, has a new Mobile Security Survival Guide. It covers topics such as how to disable the GPS in your phone, set up secure communications and protect sensitive information. It also has links to best practices for using satellite phones.

- The web site Media Helping Media recently posted “Tips for Staying Safe on Mobile,” which includes information on staying anonymous while using social media, uploading photos and stories safely, and browsing the internet securely.

- If you want a condensed summary of these and other security tips,  Lauren Wolfe, a former editor at CPJ and director of Women Under Siege, Tweeted tips from two seminars on journalism security held on World Press Freedom Day. You can find a Storify of the information she gleaned here.

Here are a few precautions suggested in all these guides:
-Take the battery out of your phone (don’t simply turn it off) to make sure it’s not transmitting its location to the cellphone network. (Don’t take an iPhone to meet sources who may be targeted.)

-If you connect to social media or other major web sites from the field, install HTTPS Everywhere browser extension, which makes your web browsing more secure. Make sure your smartphone supports sites with the https:// prefix.

-Download contacts, captions and story notes to a secure computer when possible, then wipe your phone, including the log of calls and SMS messages.

-Text messaging is one of the least secure ways to communication. Encryption software is available to encode your messages. But note: CPJ’s Security Guide and other resources point out that using encryption may call attention to your communications.

Paranoid? Sure. But it’s not only your own safety you have to be concerned about.

Related articles
Were Journalists in Homs Targeted for Bombing?

Survival Training for Conflict Zones

 

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3 Responses to “Your Cellphone Is Not Your Friend, and Other Security Tips For Conflict Zones”

  1. Your Cellphone Is Not Your Friend, and Other Security Tips For Conflict Zones | The Click Says:

    [...] Link: PDN Pulse » Blog Archive » Your Cellphone Is Not Your Friend, and Other Security Tips For Co… The surveillance of journalists covering Syria has heightened concern about the risks journalists face in relying on mobile communications and cellphones Posted by Trent Nelson Posted in Access & Censorship, Photojournalism [...]

  2. PDN Pulse » Blog Archive » Columbia J-School to Offer Safety Course for Journalists Says:

    [...] Your Cellphone is Not Your Friend, And Other Security Tips for Conflict Zones [...]

  3. Casa Says:

    All successfully done! Thanks for the comment – very considered, and pushing me too to think about all of this more. During me, I come from it from having known violent young men, and what that means. Work like Lorna Rhodes on Extremely Max features how different elements – violence, mental illness, suffering, institutionalized life, cultural forms – come together. But in the media, I do think there is the tendency to try to find the simple storyline, and that sad to say serves to explain away too much, both with physical violence and mental health.