Police Intimidation Watch: University of California to Pay Photog $162,500 for Wrongful Arrest

Posted by on Friday July 6, 2012 | Photojournalism

A news photographer who claimed wrongful arrest while covering a student protest in 2009 will receive a $162,500 settlement from the University of California, the San Francisco Chronicle has reported. UC Berkeley police will also receive media rights training as part of the settlement.

UC Berkeley police arrested photographer David Morse at the scene of a protest at the home of the University of California chancellor. Police allegedly told Morse they wanted his camera in order to identify protesters who committed acts of vandalism at the scene. They then arrested Morse along with several others on charges of rioting, arson and vandalism.

Police then got a search warrant to access his images, and they published several of them to get public help identifying people in the photos, according to the San Francisco Chronicle report.

Prosecutors declined to pursue the charges against Morse, who then sued the University of California in federal court after UC Berkeley police refused to compensate him for violation of his rights.

Related stories:
Boston to Pay $170K for Wrongful Arrest of Videographer
Mannie Garcia Files $500K Lawsuit for Unlawful Arrest
Department of Justice Warns Police Against Violating Photographers’ Rights


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