Alexia Foundation Launches Documentary Grant Focused on Violence Against Women

Posted by on Monday July 2, 2012 | Photojournalism

In an effort to bring attention to violence against women, The Alexia Foundation has launched The Women’s Initiative, a $25,000 grant that will support a photographer working on documenting abuse against women within the United States. The grant is available to photojournalists using still images or a combination of stills and video.

Since 1991, The Alexia Foundation has given $700,000 in grants to professional and student photographers  creating picture stories that advance social change and “further cultural understanding and world peace.” Having previously supported several photography projects on women’s issues and violence against women, this year The Alexia Foundation chose to launch a new grant focusing specifically on stories about abuse against women.

The Women’s Initiative grant is open to photographers worldwide, however only individual applicants may apply; no collaborations are allowed. Instead of focusing on just the artist’s portfolio, judging will be based upon the artist’s written proposal. Proposals should demonstrate an effective ability to convey a story that is concise and focused on women’s abuse and the ability to execute that story with powerful images.

A written proposal with a maximum of 750 words explaining the idea for a project that will increase overall knowledge of women’s abuse, a  portfolio of 20 photographs plus captions, a resume, and a 25 word summary that explains the main idea of the project is required. While published proposals are welcome, unpublished works are preferred; the judges will also consider proposals from photographers who want to expand previously published work.

Judging the entries will be divided into two rounds.  Initially, the Alexia photojournalism advisory board, the Alexia Board and its executive board will review each portfolio and narrow down the applicants to a group that demonstrate strong storytelling skills. In the second round a set of judges will determine a winner based upon the applicants’ proposals and photography.

The winning applicant will be notified October 1 via email and will then have six months to complete their proposed work.  At the conclusion of the initiative in the fall of 2013, The Alexia Foundation and Syracuse University will co-sponsor a conference to display the artists’ findings and discuss the growing issue of violence against women.

The deadline to apply is August 15.  To learn more information visit www.alexiafoundation.org/grants.

-Erica Siciliano


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