MOMA Appoints Quentin Bajac as Chief Curator of Photography

Posted by on Tuesday June 5, 2012 | Fine Art

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City announced today that Quentin Bajac is the museum’s new chief curator of photography. Bajac will assume the position in January 2013, replacing longtime curator Peter Galassi, who retired last year.

Bajac, who currently lives in Paris, is the chief curator of photography at the Centre Pompidou, where he’s worked for almost ten years. His past exhibitions at the museum include a retrospective of William Klein’s work; “Dreamlands,” which explored how World’s Fairs and theme parks have influenced architecture and design; and “The Subversion of Images: Surrealism, Photography, Film.” Bajac began his career as the curator of photography at the Musée d’Orsay.

In a statement released by MOMA, the museum’s director Glenn D. Lowry says:

“Quentin’s superb accomplishments in Paris over the past 17 years, at the Musée d’Orsay and the Centre Pompidou, have brought significant attention to the importance of photography in art history and as a critical component of contemporary practice.”

Bajac is also the chair in the history of photography at the Ecole du Louvre, and a graduate of the Institut d’études politiques and the Institut national du Patrimoine.


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