Andrea Bruce has been selected as the first recipient of the Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund award, organizers announced this morning. She will receive $20,000. Dominic Bracco II, who was the runner up, will receive $5,000.

Bruce covered the war in Iraq for eight years for The Washington Post. Now a freelancer based in Afghanistan, she is using documentary photography to bring attention to people living in the aftermath of war.

She was selected for the Getty Images & Chris Hondros Fund award, organizers said, because her work fulfills the award’s criteria: unyielding commitment to tell a photojournalism, outstanding work, and drive to tell a story.

The award was established to honor the life and work of Chris Hondros, the award-winning Getty Images photographer killed on April 20th, 2011, while covering the civil war in Libya.

The Chris Hondros Fund was formed by Christina Piaia, the photographer’s fiancée, with the support his family. The mission of the fund is to support the work of photojournalists and raise understanding of the issues facing those reporting from conflict zones.

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