The ingenuity and craftsmanship that go into photographer Lori Nix‘s images of carefully crafted dioramas and miniature models always elicit a smile, even when the subject is dark or ominous. This past fall, Nix and her partner and collaborator Kathleen Gerber were asked by producer and writer Joe Sabia to help make a video on a serious topic:  the overfishing of the world’s oceans. The idea was to inspire people to consider this environmental issue by explaining where sushi comes from.

Directed by Vincent Peone, “The Story of Sushi” begins in a sushi bar then moves to a fishing trawler to a warehouse and back to a restaurant. Each location is actually one of Nix and Gerber’s sets. It’s at once realistic and playful, thanks to all the props and models, including toy sharks and billowing fog –all sourced, assembled or handcrafted by Nix and Gerber.
Gerber describes the seven-month project on the Lori Nix blog.

“The Story of Sushi” can be viewed on Vimeo.


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