HBO, the premium cable network, has agreed to air a four-episode documentary series, “Witness,” about war photographers. The Hollywood Reporter says the documentaries, produced and directed by Michael Mann and David Frankham, will follow young photographers covering conflict in Mexico, Brazil, Uganda and Libya.

Not yet announced, however, is who the featured photographers are. So we want to know: Have Michael Mann and David Frankham asked if they can follow you around with cameras while you’re trying to document conflict? If not, do you care to make a guess which war photographers the series might feature?

The pilot has been shot in Juarez, Mexico, but three more episodes are in the works. We’re pretty sure that, given the HBO audience, the featured photographers will be English speakers, and at least one will be a woman. And they’ll be telegenic.

Does the reality of war make appropriate fodder for reality TV?

In a statement, Mann says: “David Frankham and I share an admiration for combat photography that captures the universal — and sometimes the indescribable — in a single frame in the midst of chaos and danger.” Frankham notes, “The direction Michael and I took in creating Witness was to immerse the audience via intimacy with the photographer into the intensity of a situation as it’s developing, as they risk their lives to capture one piece of the truth.”


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