The Committee to Protect Journalists says Mohamed Shaglouf, the driver hired by The New York Times who went missing in Libya last March, is dead. (Update: the CPJ informs PDN that it first reported Shaglouf’s death in early November.)

CPJ lists Shaglouf among 5 media workers killed on the job during 2011. In addition, CPJ says a total of 80 journalists died last year–45 of them killed in crossfire or in retribution for their reporting, and another 35 for whom the motives of their deaths have not been confirmed.

Shaglouf was working for four Times journalists, including photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks, who were arrested at a checkpoint by fighters loyal to former Libyan leader Moammar Qaddafi. They reported after their release six days later that they had lost sight of Shaglouf at the time of their arrest.

CPJ says it was told by the Times on November 7 that Shaglouf was killed at the checkpoint, according to information the Times attributed to Shaglouf’s brother.

Reporter Anthony Shadid, who was one of the four Times journalists detained at the checkpoint, also recently acknowledged during a radio interview with Terry Gross of WHYY in Philadelphia that Shaglouf was killed.

Last spring, before Shaglouf’s fate was known, Times editor Bill Keller angrily defended the paper’s treatment of fixers in the wake of accusations that the Times–and other major news organizations–don’t do enough to take care of “local hires” who are hurt, killed, or captured on the job.

“We fulfill our obligation to employees, including  local hires, who are hurt or killed in the line of duty, and to their  families in the case of death. (Yes, this includes Mohamed Shaglouf.)” Keller told the Poynter Institute last May.

The Times did not respond to PDN’s request in September for information about Shaglouf’s fate, or about any compensation that the paper might be providing to his family.

Among the 45 journalists who died in 2011 because of their work, CPJ lists 6 photographers: Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who died while covering the fighting in Libya last April 20; Anton Hemmerl, who died April 5, also while covering the fighting in Libya; Jamal al-Sharaabi, a photojournalist for the independent weekly Al-Masdar, who died while covering Arab Spring demonstrations in Yemen on March 18; Lucas Mebrouk Dolega, killed January 17 while covering the uprising in Tunisia; and Luis Emanuel Ruiz Carillo, a photographer for La Prensa in Monclova, Mexico who was abducted and shot by unknown assailants on March 25.

Related stories:

Talking About the Deaths We Don’t Talk About
What To Expect from Clients If You’re Injured on Assignment
Libya Says it Will Release Times Journalists Today

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