Just in time for the 10th anniversary of 9-11, the ACLU has highlighted its “guide to photographers’ rights” with regard to taking photographs in public places, and dealing with law enforcement officials who may try to interfere.

In a story posted on its web site today called “You have every right to photograph that cop,” the ACLU encourages photographers (and citizens with cameras) to stand up for their constitutional rights in the wake of continuing harassment by law enforcement officials around the country.

“The ACLU, photographer’s groups, and others have been complaining about such incidents for years — and consistently winning in court. Yet, a continuing stream of incidents of illegal harassment of photographers and videographers makes it clear that the problem is not going away,” the report says.

The ACLU cites several recent cases involving photographers who were illegally detained for taking photographs of buildings, transit systems, or law enforcement officials in public places. According to the ACLU, photographers are targeted under the practice of “suspicious activity reporting,” because some law enforcement officials view photography as a “precursor behavior” to terrorism.

More information is available on the ACLU web site.

The ACLU guide to photographers’ rights is posted here.

Related stories:
Cops Stop Photogs Over Subjects of No Apparent Esthetic Value
Denver Settles Lawsuit for Wrongful Arrest of Photographers, Others

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