Photographers covering the rioting in London have been assaulted, robbed and had their cameras smashed, according to a report in the London newspaper the Guardian.

The civil unrest began Sunday in the north London district of Tottenham after police shot a black youth and has since spread to other neighborhoods and cities around the UK. Photographers trying to cover the violence have been attacked in several locations. The Web site journalism.co.uk also reported that tv crews and camera trucks have been attacked in several neighborhoods in south and east London.

On Sunday, two photographers represented by the agency Matrix had £8,000 worth of equipment smashed by looters in Tottenham. One was knocked to the ground and kicked, according to an eyewitness quoted in the Guardian. On Tuesday, another photographer was attacked and beaten by four youths in a housing project in Hackney, in East London.

Paul Lewis, a reporter for the Guardian who had tried to cover violence in Hackney, told the paper,  “A number of people who have been taking photographs have been attacked,” including citizens using cellphone cameras. “I’ve seen journalists attacked quite badly actually.” The paper also reported that photographers and videographers were trying to make themselves inconspicuous by using amateur cameras.


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