A British newspaper photographer trying to cover a brawl in front of a courthouse was arrested and then “de-arrested” after the police brought the situation under control, according to a UK-based journalism resource Web site.

The site, called HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk, was quoting a Greater Manchester Police spokesperson who coined the term “de-arrested” after the incident.

“A photographer was arrested to prevent a breach of the peace and on suspicion of obstructing a police officer,” the spokesperson said. “Officers brought the situation under control and the photographer was de-arrested and subsequently released.”

The photographer, Sean Wilton of the Manchester Evening News, was ordered along with a fellow news photographer not to take pictures of the faces of the brawlers as police were rounding them up. Wilton said he was arrested when he “tried to speak to the officer about the situation.”

“We weren’t obstructing them at in any way shape or form – they were obstructing us,” said Steve Allen, the other Manchester Evening News photographer at the scene.

Though Wilton was de-arrested, the Manchester Evening News editor has yet to be de-irked, and has asked for an explanation from police.

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