Photographer Josef ‘Birdman’ Astor moved into an artist studio atop Carnegie Hall in 1985. “As a tenant with unlimited access to this little known world, I began to film my neighbors, a rapidly diminishing community of artists whose lives intersected with decades of artistic history,” he explains on the Web site for his film, Lost Bohemia. Along the way, the film turned into a poignant documentary of the tenants’ fight to preserve their community as the building’s owner began evicting them and demolishing the studio spaces.

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