The Aftermath Project, a non-profit organization that gives grants that help photographers tell stories about countries and communities affected by war and other armed conflict, has created a special, one-time $20,000 grant for conflict photographers.

The grant will be awarded to a photographer interested in telling a personal story of how their work covering war has affected their own life. The deadline for the grant is October 1, 2011.

“The subject can be approached in any way—portraits, landscapes, reportage, collaboration with a family of someone who has been killed, anything that explores the personal aftermath of covering war, whether that be PTSD, the aftermath of sexual assault, the aftermath of being wounded,” writes Aftermath Project director Sara Terry her announcement of the grant “This is a very open and fluid call for proposals on this subject, and we welcome any and all approaches.”

The grant was initiated by Terry in response to the “incredible sense of loss” in the photography community following the deaths of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Libya earlier this year.

The Aftermath Project will also award a $5,000 honorarium to a fixer who has worked with a conflict photographer and wants to tell a written or visual story about how their work has affected their life.

Photographers and fixers who apply for the grant together are eligible for the full $25,000 award.

Download the grant application here:

http://www.theaftermathproject.org/pdf/conflictgrantapplication.pdf


COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

NPPA Adds Anti-Harassment Standard to Code of Ethics

Posted by on Wednesday July 26, 2017 | Business, Photojournalism

The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) has adopted an anti-harassment standard as part of its Code of Ethics, the organization announced this week. The new standard, adopted by unanimous vote of the NPPA board of directors on July 22, states: “Do not engage in harassing behavior of colleagues, subordinates or subjects and maintain the highest... More

Photographer Tasneem Alsultan: Raising the Questions Americans Should Be Asking Themselves

Posted by on Tuesday July 25, 2017 | Photojournalism

In our recent series about how photographers cover stories as outsiders, we featured Tasneem Alsultan, among other photographers. Alsultan grew up in both the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, so she sees each culture from the perspective of the other. Our story focused on how that influences stories she’s done in Saudi Arabia, particularly “Saudi Tales... More