Freelance photojournalist Guy Martin, who was severely injured yesterday in the mortar attacks in Libya that killed photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, remains in critical condition after undergoing surgery for eight hours yesterday.

“The surgery went well, he’s recuperating, but doctors are predicting it will be 72 hours” before he can be transported out of Libya by boat for further medical care, says Josh Lustig, assignments editor at Panos Pictures. Lustig explains that the region is considered too dangerous to send in a medevac helicopter, so Martin cannot be moved sooner.

He suffered extensive injuries to his legs and abdomen when he was hit by shrapnel from the mortar attacks. A statement issued today by his mother, Karen Martin, and his partner, Polly Fields, described his condition as “stable [but] very critical.”

Martin has been in Libya for about a month, and was working without an assignment yesterday when he was injured, says Lustig, a friend of Martin’s. Panos  has been representing Martin on an informal basis in recent months. Panos also represented Hetherington.

Lustig says he notified Human Rights Watch and the UK’s Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) of Martin’s need for assistance yesterday when both those organizations stepped in to arrange transport of Hetherington’s remains out of Libya.

Reuters, Getty, and The Wall Street Journal also offered assistance, Lustig says.

“Human Rights Watch, the FCO and many media colleagues and medical staff on the ground in Misrata are helping us in getting Guy out of Libya as soon as possible to receive the medical help he needs. However, his current condition has so far prevented his evacuation,” Martin’s mother and partner said in their statement.

“We want to thank everyone for their support, especially the medical team in Misrata that has done an incredible job. Guy is a loving son, brother and partner and our main focus right now is just to get him home safely.”

Lustig notes that support for freelance photographers who get injured in hot spots while they are between assignments are mostly at the mercy of friends and acquaintances for help. “We as an agency don’t have insurance policies for our freelancers. We offer what support we can, and we’ll offer as much support as we can when he gets back. Thankfully these situations arise rarely, but it’s really up to the freelancer to make sure they have their medical insurance in place.”

Tags:

COMMENTS

MORE POSTS

Former National Geographic Editor Wilbur Garrett Dies at 85

Posted by on Wednesday August 17, 2016 | Obituary, Photojournalism

Wilbur “Bill” Garrett, who methodically raised the standards for photography at National Geographic and pushed for coverage of timely and sometimes controversial subjects during his tenure as editor in the 1980s, died at his home on August 13, National Geographic has reported. He was 85. Garrett began pushing for a more photojournalistic approach to Geographic... More

Josef Koudelka Documentary Film Offers Intimate Portrait of the Famed Photographer

Posted by on Monday July 25, 2016 | Fine Art, Photojournalism

What would it be like to assist Josef Koudelka? What could an assistant learn simply by observing and helping the legendary Czech photographer? Koudelka Shooting Holy Land, a new documentary film making its U.S. debut today at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival (and showing again this Sunday, July 31), gives viewers an opportunity to... More

“Deliberate Attack” Killed Marie Colvin and Remi Ochlik in Syria, Says Photographer Paul Conroy

Posted by on Tuesday July 12, 2016 | Copyright/Legal, Photojournalism

The sister of deceased American journalist Marie Colvin has filed a civil lawsuit in U.S. district court in Washington D.C. against the state of Syria, alleging that Colvin was deliberately targeted for extrajudicial killing by the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The 2012 artillery attack on a media center in Homs killed Colvin, 56,... More