Photographer Stephen Mallon directed this time lapse video showing the delivery and installation of the new Willis Avenue bridge linking Manhattan and the Bronx. The 2,400-ton steel structure was assembled near Coeymans, New York, then transported 136 miles down the Hudson River by barge. Mallon directed 9 camera operators working from the barge, other boats on the Hudson, and vantage points onshore along the route. He assembled the final video from more than 30,000 still images. The video will be screened at FPS Fest, which starts this evening in Brooklyn and runs through tomorrow. Other photographer/directors whose films will be screened at the festival include Danny Clinch, the Wade Brothers, Alexx Henry, to name a few.

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