The Libyan government has released three more western journalists captured in the fighting between rebels and troops loyal to Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, according to an AFP report today.

Getty Images photographer Joe Raedle, AFP photographer Roberto Schmidt, and AFP reporter Dave Clark rejoined other journalists at a hotel in Tripoli after their release earlier today. Meanwhile, two Al-Jazeera journalists also captured by Libyan government forces remain in captivity.

Two days ago, the Libyan government released four New York Times journalists who were captured by Libyan troops last week. They included photographers Tyler Hicks and Lynsey Addario and reporters Anthony Shadid and Stephen Farrell. (The Times published the journalists’ own account of their captivity yesterday.)

Clark, Schmidt and Raedle disappeared over the weekend after setting out to report on fighting between Qaddafi’s troops and rebels in the eastern portion of Libya, AFP says. Their driver reported on Monday that they had been captured by Qaddafi’s forces.

The release of the journalists came after an urgent appeal to Qaddafi from AFP chairman Emmanuel Hoog for their safe return.

Related:

Getty, AFP Photogs Missing in Libya; 4 Times Journalists Released

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