The London Mail reports that a greeting card designer has been sued for distributing a card showing a dog dressed up to look like Che Guevara in the iconic image by Cuban photographer Alberto Korda.

According to the newspaper, Korda’s daughter filed a copyright infringement claim in France against Takkoda, a British greeting card company owned by designer Kate Polyblank. Polyblank’s husband reportedly shot an image of a neighbor’s dog for the Takkoda greeting card.

The Che Guevara photograph, popular among students around the world as an iconic image of revolution, has appeared on millions of posters and t-shirts since Korda shot it in 1960. The photographer, whose real name was Alberto Diaz Gutierrez, died in 2001.

While we await word from the French courts on this claim, you be the judge. Is this illegal copyright infringement, or fair use?

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