Aftermath Project Offering $65,000 In Grants for Special Projects on Sahrawi People

Posted by on Tuesday January 25, 2011 | Photojournalism

The Aftermath Project, an organization that awards money to photographers pursuing post-conflict documentary projects, announced a special $65,000 grant cycle funded by the Howard G. Buffet Foundation. Up to three grants totaling $65,000 will be awarded to photographers to fund stories about the Sahrawi, who are indigenous to a disputed section of the Western Sahara and are struggling for independence.

According to the grant guidelines, the projects funded by the grants will address “the aftermath issues that frame [the Sahrawi’s] ongoing struggle for independence, both in refugee camps and in diaspora.”

One of the awards will be made to an African photographer.

The Howard G. Buffett Foundation, which supports global health, humanitarian and conservation initiatives among other projects, is administered by Howard Graham Buffett, the son of investor and Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett.

Grant-winners are expected to donate prints to both the Aftermath Project and the HGBF, and to provide images for educational programs developed by the two organizations.

The deadline for applications is March 25, 2011.

More information and to apply visit www.theaftermathproject.org.


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