Joao Silva, The New York Times photographer who lost his legs to a land mine in Afghanistan, got a hospital visit on Sunday from a photojournalist who was also injured by an explosive device 17 months ago. AP photographer Emilio Morenatti, who lost his left foot and part of his left leg in Afghanistan in August 2009, visited Silva at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center on Sunday, the Times Lens Blog reports.

Morenatti, who is based in Spain, had just completed a month-long assignment in Haiti, his first time covering an international crisis since his injury.

After his visit with Silva, Morenatti told the Times, “Joao is stronger even than I was,” he said. “He will be — for sure — an example for all of us.”

Like Silva, Morenatti was treated at Walter Reed. According to Lens Blog, he and Santiago Lyon, the director of photography at AP, convinced the Times that the hospital, which regularly treats veterans wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan, was the best facility for Silva.

Morenatti said that, like Silva, he found the volume of supportive and encouraging emails encouraging. The message he took from Silva: “Try not to send mail right now, because I can’t read and answer all the mail I’m receiving.”

Related stories:

After Injury, AP’s Emilio Morenatti Is Again Covering Disaster


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