Davide Monteleone of Italy has won the $20,000 Aftermath Project Grant for his project “Red Thistle” The Northern Caucasus Journey.” The Aftermath Project, which supports documentary photo projects about regions that have experienced conflict, announced the winner and finalists for the grant on December 14.

Monteleone was previously a finalist for the 2009 Aftermath Project Grant for his work in the Caucasus. Sara Terry, photojournalist and founder of The Aftermath Project, says this is the first time a finalist has gone on to win the grant. “The work he submitted this year showed a remarkable deepening of his work and a much more clearly articulated statement of the aftermath he is seeking to illuminate.”

The Aftermath Project also announced four finalists:

Miquel Dewever-Plana, France: “Guatemala: The Other War”

Elizabeth Herman, US: “Women Warriors: Bangladesh”

Massimo Mastrorillo and Lara Ciarabellini, Italy: “Bosnia y Herzegovina – If Chaos Awakens the Madness”

Carlos Javier Ortiz, US: “Too Young to Die”

The winner and finalists were selected from 155 applicants. An initial screening was done in mid-November by Terry and Lesley Meyer of the Annenberg Space for Photography. The remaining submissions were then judged by Terry; Stephen Mayes, managing director of the VII Photo Agency; Denise Wolff, book editor at Aperture; and Jeff Jacobson, photojournalist and board member of The Aftermath Project.

Images from the grant winner and finalists  will be online in early 2011 at www.theaftermathproject.org.

The Aftermath Project grant is supported by the Foundation to Promote Open Society. The Aftermath Project, a non-profit, is also supported by the Compton Foundation and tax-deductible donations from individuals.

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